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Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists

Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Mondays, Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17

In 1944 Marcel Duchamp, Julien Levy and Max Ernst organized The Imagery of Chess, an exhibition of chess sets reimagined by artists and performers. Their hope was that people's vision of the chess board and pieces would be expanded beyond the then-accepted options of either the classic Staunton design or the "French" set. In 2016, the World Chess Hall of Fame exhibited some of the works from the 1944 show to acknowledge the debt owed to those artists for forever altering the look of chess. Imagery of Chess: St. Louis Artists is the new follow-up exhibit, which invites twenty local artists to have their way with the game pieces. Among those participating are Eugenia Alexander, who cites the Afrofuturism movement as a key influence on her work; fashion designer and Project Runway vet Michael Drummond; and Yuka Suga, a glass and metals artist who also works as a therapist. A second, simultaneous show, Pow! Capturing Superheroes, Chess & Comics, showcases more than 200 chess-themed comic books (you'd be surprised by how many super villains play chess to keep their minds sharp for optimal intricate scheming functionality). There are also superhero-themed chess boards and a comic book reading room. Both exhibitions open a free reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 23, at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; www.worldchesshof.org). Imagery of Chess continues through September 14. Pow! remains up through September 17. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. $5 suggested donation

A Century of Japanese Prints

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 28, 2018

Japan had a long history of woodblock printing (ukiyo-e) that, although now recognized for their artistic qualities, were at the time purely commercial works. That began to change in the mid-nineteenth century, as Japanese artists were exposed to Western printmaking. These early modern artists began the creative print movement, which was motivated by a desire to explore the artistic possibilities of Japan's traditional hand-carved woodblock printing methods. Artists such as Kobayakawa Kiyoshi and Hashiguchi Goyō created portraits of modern Japanese society in prints that are both beautiful works of art and incredible documents of an era. The Saint Louis Art Museum displays a treasure trove of them in the new exhibit, A Century of Japanese Prints. The show opens on Friday, August 11, and remains up through January 28. Admission is free. free admission

The Hats of Stephen Jones

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3
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You may not recognize Stephen Jones by name, but you've most likely seen his work. The English milliner's creations have been worn by trend-setting celebrities for more than 30 years, from Princess Diana to Lady Gaga. A selection of eight of his avant-garde hats are displayed at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) in Hats of Stephen Jones, a complementary exhibition to the ongoing exhibition Degas, Impressionism, and the Paris Millinery Trade. Jones' exhibit will remain up from Friday, April 21 to Sunday, September 3. At 2 p.m. Sunday, April 23, Jones visits the museum to discuss his work and his inspirations with New York milliner Jennifer Ouellette. Admission to the lecture is $20 to $25; exhibition admission is $6 to $15. $6-$15

In the Realm of Trees

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Classical Chinese artists often used trees as inspirations or the focus of their works. Trees and the natural world are the focus of the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), In the Realm of Trees, which includes photographs, paintings and decorative works that glorify the beauty found in nature. The centerpiece of the show is a set of contemporary photographs called Sacred Tree on Mount Lu, made by Beijing-based photographer Michael Cherney, which was acquired for the museum's permanent collection in 2016 and will be presented for the first time in this exhibit. In the Realm of Trees opens on Friday, March 10, and remains up through Sunday, September 3, in gallery 225. The gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday, and admission is free. free admission

New Media Series: Amy Granat

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 12

In the nineteenth century the American Dream was tied up in Manifest Destiny. We would spread across the continent from the East to the West on foot, by wagon or train. Once the West was won, the dream changed and became nice home, a fast car and an open road. But what is the American Dream today, when we cover the land from to sea to sea and all frontiers are gone? Amy Granat's Cars, Trees, Houses, Beaches is a silent 16mm film loop of Hawaiian beaches, muscle cars and modernist homes, among them Kirkwood's own Russell and Ruth Goetz Krauss house, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. The film ruminates on these conquered frontiers, many of which are once again the stuff of dreams for Americans. The Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org) presents Granat's film as part of its long-running New Media Series. It shows on an endless loop from July 14 to November 12 in gallery 301. Admission is free, and the museum is open every day except Monday. free admission

Jennifer Colten: Higher Ground

Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 26

Back in the old days, the insanities of racism and segregation kept black people and white people out of the same graveyards. Washington Park Cemetery was for many years the largest final resting place for black St. Louis. Its proximity to Lambert St. Louis International Airport doomed it, however. Highway 70 ran through the middle of the cemetery in the 1950s, and more bodies were moved in the '90s when MetroLink tracks were laid and the airport expanded. Photographer Jennifer Colten documented the current state of the cemetery for the new multimedia exhibition Higher Ground: Honoring Washington Park Cemetery, Its People and Place. Her large-scale, color photographs are supported by historical documentation, video and oral histories (by Denise Ward-Brown) and an art installation by Dail Chambers, all toward the goal of illuminating the racial politics and tangled history behind a black cemetery’s sacrifice in the name of progress. free admission

Buy Tickets
The Sheldon (map)
3648 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-9900
Jennifer Colten:  Higher Ground

Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

Sundays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Continues through Sept. 3

Emily Oliver's work in Weaving as Ritual and Art is deceptively sparse. Her widely spaced color bars and shapes only look that way because you're thinking like a painter; all the white space in her weaving requires as much work as the colored bits, after all. Oliver's new exhibition Weaving as Ritual and Art alludes to early Modernist painters through her use of negative space and isolated color, but her work also hews to the pattern-making that comprises traditional textile arts. The exhibition opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, July 7, at the Dark Room (3610 Grandel Square; www.thedarkroomstl.com). The show remains up through September 3. free admission

The Dark Room (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-776-9550
Emily Oliver: Weaving as Ritual and Art

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15, 2018

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights

Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear 1715-2015

Tuesdays-Thursdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through Sept. 17
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It was the poet-philosopher Billy Gibbons who first posited that "every girl is crazy 'bout a sharp-dressed man," and yet on the whole, American men have settled for athletic team logos and cargo shorts. But there's more to life than five-pocket shorts and t-shirts. Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear 1715-2015, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), celebrates the beauty and style that's available to men. The show traces development of the suit from its origins as a military uniform through the heavily embroidered great coats of the nineteenth century, with a detour into the effectiveness of the black leather jacket before finishing up with modern sartorial splendors. Reigning Men is open Tuesday through Saturday (June 25 to September 17), and admission is $6 to $15, but the show is free on Friday. $6-$15, free on Friday

Happy Hour - With a Purpose

Wed., Aug. 23, 5-8 p.m.
phone 314-615-1047
meetanew@meetanew.com

Presented by BBBSEMO in partnership with Habitat for Humanity & Major Brands. Join us for happy hour on the Anew Rooftop! Enjoy a $5 bubbles tasting and cash bar while listening to Kenny DeShields. Entry is free and open to the public.

Perennial Beer Dinner

Wed., Aug. 23, 6-9 p.m.
phone 314-633-7800
info@theprestonstl.com

Join us at The Preston for an exquisite five-course, prix fixe dinner featuring a fine selection of local, crafted beers from Perennial Artisanal Ales! The chefs have prepared a special menu for each of the beers. Complimentary Valet is included. First Course: Twisted Ravioli paired with Perennial Southside Blonde Ale Second Course: Shrimp Ceviche paired with Perennial Suburban Beverage gose-style ale Third Course: Sweetbreads paired with Perennial Owen Saison Fourth Course: Chai Cured Pork Belly paired with Perennial Saison de Lis Fifth Course: Bitter Orange and Chocolate Entremet paired with Perennial 17 imperial stout $65

https://www.facebook.com/events/136889750245040/
Buy Tickets
The Preston (map)
212 N Kingshighway Blvd
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-633-7800
Perennial Beer Dinner

Songbird Cafe

Wed., Aug. 23, 7:30 p.m.

$15-$18

Buy Tickets
The Focal Point (map)
2720 Sutton Blvd
Maplewood
phone 314-560-2778

Songbird Cafe

Wed., Aug. 23, 7:30-10 p.m.
phone 314-482-8994
saintcyr@hotmail.com

Singer/songwriters In The Round—a format unique in STL, Songbird presents Gloria Attoun Michael Bauermeister, Lynne Reif and Mike Schrand in a song and story swap as a listening experience. Advance tickets www.songbird-stl.com $15-$18

http://www.songbird-stl.com
Buy Tickets
The Focal Point (map)
2720 Sutton Blvd
Maplewood
phone 314-560-2778
Songbird Cafe

Desert Noises

Wed., Aug. 23, 8 p.m.

$10-$12

Off Broadway (map)
3509 Lemp Ave.
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-498-6989

Framing The Red

Wed., Aug. 23, 8 p.m.

$10

The Firebird (map)
2706 Olive St.
St. Louis - Midtown
phone 314-535-0353
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