Search for…

Narrow Search

955 total results

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind

Mon., Sept. 25, 7 p.m.
,

Japanese filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki’s concern for the ecology and the future of the planet suffuse all of his films, but are on grand display in Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind. Set a thousand years in the future, all living things are slowly being consumed by a vast Sea of Decay. One of the few remaining patches of unspoiled earth is tucked away in the Valley of the Wind. Nausicaä is a young woman who ignores the warnings of the elders and ventures out into the world on her small powered glider so that she can observe the changes happening all over the planet. Threatened by giant insects, warring clans and the slow march of destruction, she suddenly realizes there may be a way to restart the life cycle of the planet. Nausicaä is a sweeping film about a hero who believes in life more than she fears death. Fathom Events puts it back on the big screen for a limited time. You can see the English dubbed version at 12:55 p.m. Sunday and the subtitled film at 7 p.m. Monday (September 24 and 25) at Marcus Wehrenberg Ronnies 20 Cine (5320 South Lindbergh Boulevard; www.fathomevents.com). Tickets are $12.50. $12.50

Buy Tickets

Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 8, 2018

Human beings' adaptability is what allows people to gradually come to terms with catastrophic change and trauma. In the Western world, we consider it possible for someone who has experienced a tragedy to "heal," thereby erasing a wrong. But the non-Western world doesn't always believe that disaster can be plastered over. In some countries, the scars and imperfections are celebrated. These conflicting ideas of past damage are the inspiration for French-Algerian artist Kader Attia's exhibition Reason's Oxymorons. Attia interviewed and filmed historians, storytellers, philosophers and ethnographers from around the world discussing their cultural ideas of healing psychic damage. These films are then continuously played on an array of televisions placed throughout a maze of gray cubicles. The viewer can pass from cube to cube, gaining exposure to previously foreign worldviews. Kader Attia: Reason's Oxymorons opens with a free public reception from 7 to 9 p.m. tonight at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on the Washington University campus (1 Brookings Drive; www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu). The show remains up through January 8, and the museum is open every day except Tuesday. free admission

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15, 2018

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; www.mohistory.org) chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights

The Golden Hour

Mondays-Fridays, 7 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 21, 5-7 p.m. Continues through Oct. 27

Art Saint Louis challenged artists to capture the golden hour — that magic time at dawn and dusk when sunlight gives the world a luminous beauty — in the medium of their choice for the gallery's new show. The works selected for the juried exhibit run the gamut. Lorraine Cange photographed a Jewel Box lily pond in black and white, focusing on the pattern of shadows formed on the lily pads. Russell Vanecek captured the glory of a Flad Avenue alley bisected by a bright box of brilliant sunlight. Bob Rickert's abstract photograph of the Palouse hills in Washington State is a model of contrasts, with stark shadows giving way to glowing hilltops. The Golden Hour is at Art Saint Louis (1223 Pine Street; www.artsaintlouis.org). The show continues through October 27, and the gallery is open 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. There will be a rescheduled closing reception from 5-7 p.m. Saturday, October 21. free admission

Art Saint Louis (map)
1223 Pine St
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-241-4810
The Golden Hour

Throw The Fight

Mon., Sept. 25, 6 p.m.

w/ Deadships, Glass Houses $12-$13

The Firebird (map)
2706 Olive St.
St. Louis - Midtown
phone 314-535-0353

Page to Stage

Mon., Sept. 25, 7-8 p.m.
phone 314-994-3300
adultprogram@slcl.org
, ,

Join the The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis in a presentation about what it takes to put on a play, from how it is chosen to what it takes to get it on stage. Teen and Adults. $0

https://www.slcl.org/content/page-stage
St. Louis County Library, Lewis & Clark Branch (map)
9909 Lewis & Clark Blvd.
Jennings
phone 314-868-0331
Page to Stage

American Aquarium

Mon., Sept. 25, 8 p.m.

$17-$20

Off Broadway (map)
3509 Lemp Ave.
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-498-6989
BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups (map)
700 S. Broadway
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-436-5222

CJ Boyd

Mon., Sept. 25, 8 p.m.

w/ Mother Bear $7

Foam Coffee & Beer (map)
3359 Jefferson Ave.
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-772-2100

High Waisted

Mon., Sept. 25, 8 p.m.

w/ the Coax, Sister Wizzard $7

The Sinkhole (map)
7423 South Broadway
St. Louis - South City
phone 314-328-2309
thesinkholebooking@gmail.com

Rhiannon Giddens

Mon., Sept. 25, 8 p.m.

$30-$45

Buy Tickets
The Pageant (map)
6161 Delmar Blvd.
Delmar/ The Loop
phone 314-726-6161

Volunteers Needed to Care for Wildlife

Mondays-Sundays. Continues through Oct. 1
phone 636-677-3670
info@wild-life-rehab.com
,

Volunteers needed to help care for wildlife. No experience necessary! You must be 18 or older and up-to-date on your tetanus. Volunteers must be able to give their time one day a week for one 5 hour shift. Volunteer shifts are 8am-1pm and 6pm-11pm seven days a week. You will be feeding wildlife and cleaning cages while the injured or orphaned wildlife is in our care prior to it being released back into the wild. These are not pets, these are wild animals that need our help. To fill out a volunteer application go to our website at www.wild-life-rehab.com. Free

http://www.wild-life-rehab.com
Wildlife Rehabilitation Clinic (map)
1864 Little Brennan Rd
Fenton
phone 636-677-3670
Volunteers Needed to Care for Wildlife

Renaissance and Baroque Prints: Investigating the Collection

Mondays, Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 8, 2018
phone 314-935-4523
kemperartmuseum@wustl.edu
,

With its fine slashing lines and dark, inky shadows, Rembrandt’s “The Three Crosses” is mournful, majestic, and exemplifies the artist’s experimental approach to printmaking. This fall, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum will present the historic etching, and more than 100 other prints, as part of “Renaissance and Baroque Prints: Investigating the Collection.” Free

https://source.wustl.edu/2017/09/renaissance-baroque-prints-investigating-collection/

Kader Attia: Reason’s Oxymorons

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 7-9 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Jan. 8, 2018
phone 314-935-4523
kemperartmuseum@wustl.edu
,

What is the nature of the self? How do conceptions differ in Western and non-Western cultures? Can individual and collective traumas ever be “fixed,” or do certain wounds defy the notion of repair? In “Reason’s Oxymorons,” French-Algerian artist Kader Attia surveys how different cultures, societies and disciplines grapple with questions of loss and damage. Free

http://www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu/exhibitions/11993

Dan Jones

Tue., Sept. 26, 7 p.m.

English historian Dan Jones has a knack for telling the big stories of history (the War of the Roses, the rise of fall of the Plantagenet family) in a conversational, easy-going manner. His new book, The Templars, attempts to free the soldiers of the feared Crusader-era military order from the centuries of legends, lies and fantasy that have built up around them. The Templars were many things — holy warriors, shrewd bankers and flawed men — but their destruction at the hands of King Philip IV of France had less to do with devil worship and secret conspiracies than it did Philips' massive debts to the Templars. Jones discusses the Order and his book at 7 p.m. Tuesday, September 26, at Left Bank Books (399 North Euclid Avenue; www.left-bank.com). Admission is free, but you must buy a copy of The Templars through Left Bank to get in the signing line. free admission

Left Bank Books (map)
399 N Euclid Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-367-6731
Dan Jones
Showing 1-15 of 955 total results in this search.

Best Things to Do In St. Louis

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.


© 2017 Riverfront Times

Website powered by Foundation