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Schlafly's Stout and Oyster Fest

Fri., March 23, 5 p.m., Sat., March 24, 11 a.m. and Sun., March 25, 11 a.m.

Oysters can really divide a crowd. If you're on the side that favors the glistening beauties, you owe it to yourself to be at Schlafly's 19th annual Stout and Oyster festival. This year's party is the largest in Schlafly's history, with more than 80,000 oysters and at least twenty shuckers from both coasts performing in "the Shuckerdome." The brewery has worked up some special limited-edition stouts exclusively for the fest, with fifteen total stouts on offer. Live music, stout tasting bars and oyster tasting bars round things out. The biggest-ever Stout and Oyster festival takes place from 5 p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. Saturday (March 23 and 24) at the Schlafly Tap Room (2100 Locust Street; Admission is free, but you'll need funds to underwrite your beer and oyster intake. free admission

Schlafly Tap Room (map)
2100 Locust St.
St. Louis - Downtown
phone 314-241-2337
Schlafly's Stout and Oyster Fest

Karlovsky & Company Dance

Fri., March 23, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., March 24, 7:30 p.m.

Memory is a slippery thing. What sticks in your brain about an event or a person is not always what you'd expect or want to remember. Choreographer Dawn Karlovsky explores the strange terrain of memory in her new longform dance Remembrance. The piece draws on personal accounts of the past and historic documents to show how the past affects the present. Remembrance is the centerpiece of Karlovsky & Company Dance's spring concert, and it's performed at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday (March 23 and 24) at the Grandel Theatre (3610 Grandel Square; Also on the bill is a dance by French choreographer Marie Christine Dal Farra inspired by Paul Cézanne's paintings of Mont Sainte-Victoire. Tickets are $15 to $20. $15-$20

Grandel Theatre (map)
3610 Grandel Square
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Karlovsky & Company Dance

The Color Purple

Sundays, 1 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m. Continues through April 1

Alice Walker's novel The Color Purple has been a bestseller since its release, and the musical based on the book is similarly crowd-pleasing. The show tells the story of Celie, a black woman abused and stifled by the men in her life to the point that she sees no value in herself. But with the love of her sister, and the friendship she develops with her husband's mistress and the other women in her small Southern town, Celie begins to realize that even she is worthy of love and respect. The current Broadway revival of The Color Purple is performed at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday (March 20 to April 1) at the Fox Theatre (527 North Grand Boulevard; Tickets are $25 to $85. $25-$85

Buy Tickets
The Fox Theatre (map)
527 N. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-534-1111
The Color Purple

Vivian Maier: Photography's Lost Voice

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 26

Vivian Maier burst onto the art scene in 2007 with her treasure trove of urban photography. It was quite a feat for an 81-year-old, but even more so because most of her work was of mid-century New York and Chicago, and she had ceased making images a decade earlier. Also, she didn't ever show her work herself; filmmaker John Maloof bought a crate of negatives at auction and in it discovered her vast archive. He has spent years printing and scanning these negatives to bring her work to the public eye. Vivian Maier: Photography's Lost Voice, the new exhibition at the International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum (3415 Olive Street;, offers St. Louis the rare opportunity to see Maier's work up close. The show includes her black-and-white urban images, her later color abstract work and examples of her landscape portraiture. Vivian Maier: Photography's Lost Voice is on display Wednesday through Saturday (February 21 to May 26). Admission is $5 to $10. $5-$10

Anything Goes

Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through March 24

Cole Porter's musical confection Anything Goes is a fizzy farce that fills a steamship with gangsters, televangelists and high society, and then points them out to sea. New Line Theatre artistic director Scott Miller views the show as something far more tart: In his eyes it's a satire of America's penchant for glorifying criminals and talentless pretty people, and the practice of religion as a commercial pursuit. With that in mind, New Line Theatre's new production of Anything Goes will use the 1962 version of the show (P.G. Wodehouse worked on that script) and will take aim at some very tender targets. Anything Goes is performed at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday (March 1 to 24) at the Marcelle Theatre (3310 Samuel Shepard Drive; Tickets are $15 to $25. $15-$25

Marcelle Theater (map)
3310 Samuel Shepard Dr
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-533-0367
Anything Goes

As It Is in Heaven

Sundays, 2 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through March 31

The Shakers were a Protestant group who believed in celibacy, gender segregation and the benefits of hard work (the celibacy rule eventually led to a dramatic thinning of their numbers). In rural Kentucky in the 1920s, the hard work is left unfinished when three newcomers to the women's section of the community announce they've been visited by angels. Instead of ushering in rejoicing, these purported visitations spark doubt and disbelief, a dangerous combination in a religious, utopian community. Arlene Hutton's As It Is in Heaven features an all-female cast and single-melody songs, and it explores questions of faith, the plight of women and the nature of belief. Mustard Seed Theatre presents the play at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (March 15 to 31) at the Fontbonne Fine Arts Theater (6800 Wydown Boulevard; Tickets are $15 to $35. $15-$35

Fontbonne University Fine Arts Theatre (map)
6800 Wydown Blvd.
phone 314-862-3456
As It Is in Heaven

Born Yesterday

Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Sat., March 24, 4 p.m., Sun., March 25, 2 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m., Sun., April 1, 2 p.m., Wed., April 4, 1:30 p.m. and Sun., April 8, 2 & 7 p.m. Continues through April 8

Harry Brock is in Washington D.C. on business, but then Harry's always on business. The cunning junk man has built an empire of garbage on crooked deals and cut-throat tactics, and he figures the only thing that will further enrich him is if he has a senator of his own on the payroll. As always, his girlfriend Billie has accompanied him, because he and Billie are linked by more than love. But Billie's brash manner and informal education (she's an ex-showgirl) make her a liability in the high-stakes world of government corruption, so Harry hires her a tutor in the form of journalist Paul Verrall. What he didn't count on is that Billie is ignorant, not stupid. Paul's teachings stick, and she recognize Harry is both immoral and dangerous -- not like the intelligent, morally upright Paul. Garson Kanin's comedy Born Yesterday was a big hit in 1946, and since our government is still corrupt and easily bought today, all the laughs remain intact 70 years later. The Repertory Theatre St. Louis closes its current season with Born Yesterday. Performances are Tuesday through Sunday (March 14 to April 8) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; Tickets are $18.50 to $89. $18.50-$89

Dario Calmese: amongst friends.

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31

Harlem preservationist Lana Turner is known for her collection of vintage fashions, among many other things. St. Louis-born artist Dario Calmese originally wanted to photograph her numerous hats, but quickly realized that Turner's personal style (she believes dressing is an artistic medium) should be captured in whole. Calmese photographed her in her Sunday best, tapping into the long black church tradition and Turner's own recreation of her identity through her savoir faire, which he fixed in black and white images. Calmese's photographs of Turner are partly theatrical, partly a statement of black identity, and they comprise his new exhibition, Dario Calmese: amongst friends. The show opens with a free public reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, February 16, at Projects+Gallery (4733 McPherson Avenue; At 1 p.m. Saturday, February 17, Calmese and Tuner discuss their collaboration at the gallery. Dario Calmese: amongst friends. remains up through March 31, and the gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday. free admission

Projects + Gallery (map)
4733 McPherson Ave
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-696-8678
Dario Calmese: amongst friends.

Tom Huck: Electric Baloneyland

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through March 31

For decades, St. Louis artist Tom Huck has been delighting and revolting the masses in equal parts with his beautifully grotesque woodcut prints. From his Evil Prints outpost on Washington Avenue, Huck creates incredibly intricate, satirical images that call to mind the best of the Garbage Pail Kids as passed through an Albrecht Dürer filter. His latest show, Electric Baloneyland, catalogs the downward trajectory of American society through the lens of a county fair in Huck's patented confrontational style. The exhibition makes its St. Louis debut this week with an opening reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, February 16, at the Duane Reed Gallery (4729 McPherson Avenue; The show continues through March 31. free admission

Duane Reed Gallery (map)
4729 McPherson Ave.
St. Louis - Central West End
phone 314-361-4100
Tom Huck: Electric Baloneyland

Ben Pierce: Ota Benga

Fridays, Saturdays, 12-3 p.m. Continues through March 31

The 1904 World's Fair still looms large in St. Louis' collective consciousness, but not everyone who attended had grand memories. A young Congolese man named Ota Benga was at the fair not as a visitor but as an exhibit. He was kidnapped and transported across the Middle Passage by a venal American some 40 years after the abolition of slavery, and then displayed as an example of the "subhuman" nature of black people. After the fair he was removed to a cage in the Bronx zoo, where he suffered even greater indignities. This sad and needlessly cruel moment in the twentieth century inspired local artist Ben Pierce's new show, Ota Benga. Pierce wondered how a man could reclaim his humanity after being treated in such an inhuman manner. His paintings of exotic birds transformed into ritual masks and sacred garb, which become both symbols of the secret self and of freedom from your true identity. Ben Pierce: Ota Benga opens with a free public reception from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, March 9, at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary (2713 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood; The show remains up through March 31. free admission

Hoffman LaChance Contemporary (map)
2713 Sutton Blvd.
phone 314-960-5322
Ben Pierce: Ota Benga

Global Moves: Americans in Chess Olympiads

Mondays, Tuesdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through April 1

The Chess Olympiad is a biennial competition in which national teams compete for the title. America is the current holder, triumphing against 180 other nations to achieve the victory. It was our first win since 1976, and so the World Chess Hall of Fame takes this golden opportunity to honor the reigning champions. The exhibition Global Moves: Americans in Chess Olympiads is a celebration of America's current and past glories, with numerous historic chess artifacts being displayed — among them, a gold medal from the 2016 team. Grandmasters Fabiano Caruana, Hikaru Nakamura, Wesley So, Ray Robson and Sam Shankland, who all played for the 2016 American team, will attend the opening reception, which takes place from 6 to 8 p.m. tonight at the World Chess Hall of Fame (4652 Maryland Avenue; Also on display is the Hamilton-Russell Cup, the trophy granted to the Olympiad's winning team. Global Moves continues through April 1. $3-$5 suggested donation

Postwar Prints and Multiples: Investigating the Collection

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays. Continues through April 16

Like many collecting institutions, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum (1 Brookings Drive; houses more art than it can easily display. As part of its continuing mission to bring stored pieces out for the public to enjoy, the Kemper presents its new exhibition, Postwar Prints and Multiples: Investigating the Collection. The exhibit draws on the wealth of printed artwork by a range of artists who rose to prominence during the twentieth century from a host of artistic movements. Among the artists represented by key works are Ellsworth Kelly, Claes Oldenburg, Man Ray, Meret Oppenheim, Roy Lichtenstein and La Monte Young. Postwar Prints and Multiples opens with a free reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, February 2, at the museum. The show remains on display through April 16, and admission is free. free admission

Trenton Doyle Hancock: The Re-Evolving Door to the Moundverse

Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 22

Drawing inspiration from the morality tales of cartoons (a cat is always bad, but birds or mice are good; dogs also are heroes), comic books (equally flamboyant bad guys and good guys), video games and films, Trenton Doyle Hancock created his own private universe, one in which the Mounds (half-plant, half-animal, all-good living forest) and the Vegans (they eat Mounds!) endlessly battle it out for supremacy. Both Coonbear and Bringback, a henchman in a striped unitard, are part of the battle, because they're also some part of Hancock. Politics, race, class, identity and issues of social justice are hidden in these stories, just like Sun Ra's own fully scored space operas in the jazz world. Trenton Doyle Hancock: The Re-Evolving Door to the Moundverse is a collection of these drawings, sculptures and prints that show part of the eternal struggle of good and evil, right and wrong, moral and immoral. The Re-Evolving Door to the Moundverse opens with a free reception at 7 p.m. Friday, January 19, at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (3750 Washington Boulevard; Hancock will discuss the Moundverse and his work at 11 a.m. Saturday, January 20. The show continues through April 22, and the gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Admission is free. free admission


Thursdays, Fridays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 & 7 p.m. and Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m. Continues through March 24

Chinese artist Lin Bo made headlines with his audacious virtual protest on the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, and the wave of publicity surrounding him hasn't crested yet. The artist will appear in St. Louis to address his work, conditions for dissident artists in China and activism as the guest of the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis this month. His address includes examples of the work that riled China's ruling powers, which will be on display for the duration of his stay. Lin Bo is also a character in Christopher Chen's play Caught, which asks pointed questions about art collectors' love of a sob story, the politics of supporting dissidents as an investment, and the slippery nature of looking for objective truth in the subjective media of art and theater. Caught is performed Tuesday through Sunday (March 7 to 25) at the Loretto-Hilton Center (130 Edgar Road; Tickets are $45 to $69.50. $45-$69.50

#1 in Civil Rights

Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 15

St. Louis' history as a wellspring of civil rights activism is deep and impressive. Dred and Harriet Scott's legal fight to be free, Mary Meachum's bold actions leading slaves to freedom across the Mississippi River, the Jefferson Bank protesters organizing to get access to better jobs, Percy Green and the daring VP Ball invaders who challenged St. Louis' powerful elite and the exclusionary nature of their private party — all of these people fought the good fight in St. Louis. #1 in Civil Rights, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue; chronicles the history of the civil rights movement in the metro area through artifacts, historical photos, oral histories, art work and actors' performances. Every key moment in the black struggle for equality is covered up to the present day, with artifacts collected by the museum staff following the killing of Michael Brown and the resulting civil unrest in Ferguson playing a major role in the exhibit. #1 in Civil Rights opens on Saturday, March 11, and continues through April 15, 2018. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
#1 in Civil Rights
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