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St. Louis County Greek Festival

Mon., May 27, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
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How do you know when summer starts and ends in St. Louis? Easy: Check the Greek festival location. The St. Louis County Greek Festival at Assumption Greek Orthodox Church (1755 Des Peres Road, Town & Country; www.stlouisgreekfest.com) is the starter pistol for summer, while the Greek festival in the city is the checkered flag. Start the sweaty season the right way, with a veritable Mt. Olympus of Greek food, live music and folk dancing, a kids corner with a bounce house, and a traditional Old World market offering Hellenic souvenirs, jewelry and even groceries. The St. Louis County Greek Festival is open from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday through Sunday, and 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday (May 24 to 27). Admission is free, but bring your wallet — you can't smell roast lamb shanks and not buy some, no matter how tough you think you are. free admission

Assumption Greek Orthodox Church (map)
1755 Des Peres Road
Town & Country
phone 314-966-2255
St. Louis County Greek Festival

Rachel Whiteread

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 9

Rachel Whiteread emerged on the London art scene in the "cool Britannia" era of the late '80s and early '90s. The country was doing well financially and culturally, and people were ready to buy contemporary art made by contemporary British artists. Whiteread established herself as a leading light with her casts of everyday objects, which solidified the negative space in, under and/or around them in materials such as wax, plaster, concrete and resin. House, Whiteread's massive, freestanding concrete cast of the interior of an entire three-story Victorian house, earned her the prestigious Turner Prize in 1993, making her the first woman to win. Rachel Whiteread, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum, is a retrospective of the artist's career that showcases 96 objects. They range from the small Untitled (Pink Torso), a voluptuous form of the inside of a hot water bottle cast in pink dental plaster, to the expansive Untitled (Twenty-Five Spaces), translucent resin casts of the underside of various chairs and stools arrayed on a game-board-like grid. The exhibit is on display Tuesday through Sunday (March 17 to June 9) at the Saint Louis Arts Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), and tickets are $6 to $12 (but free on Friday). $6-$12

Poetics of the Everyday: Amateur Photography 1890-1970

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 25

Portable cameras democratized photography. Once anybody could carry a camera with them, photography became a hobby as well as an art. Poetics of the Everyday: Amateur Photography 1890-1970, the new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum (1 Fine Arts Drive; www.slam.org), features 110 works by unknown moms and dads. They show children, landscapes, family gatherings and of course the family dog, with often unintentional effects such as the dreaded double exposure. Despite being made by strangers, the images of family vacations and candid shots have a familiarity that makes them universal. Poetics of the Everyday is on display in galleries 234 and 235 from Friday, April 26, to August 25. Admission is free. free admission

How We See: Materiality and Color

Through June 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Humans can perceive a wide palette of colors, but we don't see as many hues as nature contains. The limitations of human vision are stretched in the Laumeier Sculpture Park's new exhibition How We See: Materiality and Color. Six artists who combine modern art practices with a keen observation of the natural world explore the possibilities of color manipulation and perception. Claire Ashley's specially commissioned, large-scale inflatable Ruddy Udder Dance is painted in neon colors. Volunteers will get inside it and perform a series of choreographed routines that allow you to see how its various shades change with movement and daylight. Ann Lindberg's graphite-and-colored-pencil piece as though air could turn to honey features a closely packed array of thin lines of pure pigment that become subtly darker toward the bottom. From a distance those tints blend and fade, and the piece appears to have a more uniform golden hue. How We See opens with a free reception at 11 a.m. Saturday, March 2, at Laumeier's Aronson Fine Arts Center (12580 Rott Road, Sunset Hill; www.laumeier.org). The exhibit continues through June 29, and admission is free. free admission

Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Through June 2

The Muny is just about to open its landmark 100th season, and its neighbor, the Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBalivere Avenue; www.mohistory.org), celebrates the occasion with an exhibit dedicated to the history of America's largest outdoor theater. Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage features exhibits that explain the founding of the theater, display favorite memories from stars and staff, and give a look back stage to see how the dedicated technical crew creates and rigs all those sets and lights. You can also take a look at programs from the Muny's long, storied past. Muny Memories opens on Saturday, June 9, and remains on display daily through June 2, 2019. Admission is free. free admission

Missouri History Museum (map)
Lindell Blvd. & DeBaliviere Ave.
St. Louis - Forest Park
phone 314-746-4599
Muny Memories: 100 Years on Stage

Striking Power: Iconoclasm in Ancient Egypt

Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11

In his sonnet "Ozymandias," Percy Bysshe Shelley describes the legs of an epic statue in the desert wastelands, its ruined face lying "half sunk" in the sand. The inscription on the pedestal reads, "My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!" The poem is a meditation on time wearing away the memory of even the mightiest, and a reminder that death means forgetfulness. In truth, it may have been Ozymandias' successor who destroyed the statue upon assuming the title of pharaoh. Statues and memorial inscriptions held ritual power for the Egyptians, and it behooved the new ruler to sweep away all remnant of his or her predecessor. In the Pulitzer Arts Foundation's (3716 Washington Boulevard; www.pulitzerarts.org) new exhibition, Striking Power: Iconoclasm in Ancient Egypt, the legacies of the pharaohs Hatshepsut and Akhenaten are examined through almost 40 historical objects that are both defaced and whole. Memory and visual culture are intertwined, and the destruction of the latter can easily erase the former. Striking Power opens with a free reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 22. The work remains on display through August 11. free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation (map)
3716 Washington Blvd.
St. Louis - Grand Center
phone 314-754-1850
Striking Power: Iconoclasm in Ancient Egypt

Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis' Summer Exhibitions

Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18

The Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis' summer exhibitions open at 7 p.m. Friday, May 17, and there are some heavy hitters involved. Lawrence Abu Hamdan is a finalist for this year's Turner Prize for his exhibition Earwitness Theatre (which CAM co-commissioned with several other institutions), which incorporates the artist's audio analysis of Saydnaya prison in Syria, site of numerous humanitarian abuses, a soundbooth and groups of objects Abu Hamdan uses as mnemonic devices to facilitate reenactments of crimes. Photographer Paul Mgapi Sepuya receives his first major museum survey thanks to CAM. Sepuya's images jumble and reorder the human body, while also revealing the mechanics of photography. Cameras are often a central figure in his work, while tripods, backdrops and lighting show up in his collages. Avoiding digital manipulation, Sepuya's work is about the importance of touch and contact, both between his subjects and his materials. Both shows remain on display at CAM (3750 Washington Boulevard; www.camstl.org) through August 18, and admission is free. free admission

Nina Simone: Four Women

Sundays, 3 p.m., Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Thursdays, 7 p.m. Continues through June 2

In recent years, the mainstream media began reassessing the career and impact of musician Nina Simone, with documentaries exploring her personal life and rereleases of her works. Playwright Christina Ham knew there was more to Simone than her musicianship – after the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church and the assassination of Medgar Evers, Simone gave voice to the shared anger and outrage of the black community in her surprisingly jaunty song "Mississippi Goddamn." Ham's play Nina Simone: Four Women (inspired by Simone's namesake song about the plight of black women in a racist society) explores how the arts helped drive and inspire the civil rights moment, as well as the ways women were shunted to the side of that same movement. The Black Rep closes its season with Nina Simone: Four Women. Performances are at 7 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (May 17 to June 2) at Washington University's Edison Theatre (6465 Forsyth Boulevard; www.theblackrep.org). Tickets are $15 to $45. $15-$45

Buy Tickets
Edison Theatre (map)
6445 Forsyth Blvd.
Clayton
phone 314-935-6543

I Now Pronounce

Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Continues through June 1

Nicole and Adam are finally taking the matrimonial plunge, but it seems like fate – and a friend or two – is against them. When a key member of the wedding party keels over dead, the ceremony is halted before completion. Adam's groomsman Dave uses this respite to convince Adam that monogamy and marriage is a trap that's not worth the trouble. Nicole's bridesmaid Michelle, who's going stag, figures this would be a good time to find a date before the end of the night, while the other bridesmaid tries to get this trainwreck back on schedule. Tasha Gordon-Solmon's I Now Pronounce is a good old-fashioned farce. New Jewish Theatre ends its current season with the comedy. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday (May 18 to June 1) in the Jewish Community Center's Wool Studio Theatre (2 Millstone Campus Drive, Creve Coeur; www.newjewishtheatre.org). Tickets are $42 to $45. $42-$45

Cedar Lake Cellars' May Music Series

Fri., May 31, 6-9 p.m.
phone 636-745-9500
rochelle@brandveinpr.com

5/3, 6-9pm, Bryan Toben; 5/4, 1-4pm, All 4 Nothin Band and 6-9pm, Pure Nectar; 5/5, 1-4pm, Richie Kihlken; 5/10, 6-9pm, Stephen Jones; 5/11, 1-4pm, Rogers & Neinhaus and 6-9pm, Retro Boogie; 5/12, 1-4pm, Graven & LaDuke; 5/17, 6-9pm, The Retro Band; 5/18, 1-4pm, Billy Peek and 7-10pm, McLovin; 5/19, 1-4pm, Crossfire; 5/24, 6-9pm, Roger & Bill; 5/25, 1-4pm, Revolution and 6-9pm, Wildfire; 5/26, 1-4pm, Off Topic and 6-9pm, The Trilogy Band; 5/31, 6-9pm, Mikayla Gunn Free to those 21 years of age and older

http://www.cedarlakecellars.com
Cedar Lake Cellars (map)
11008 Schreckengast Road
Outstate MO
phone 636-745-9500

I Now Pronounce

Thu., May 30, 7:30 p.m., Fri., May 31, 8 p.m., Sat., June 1, 8 p.m. and Sun., June 2, 2 p.m.
phone 314-442-3283
info@newjewishtheatre.org

Written by Tasha Gordon-Solmon. A play that mines disconnections. After Adam and Nicole’s wedding culminates in an awkwardly timed fatality, the reception spins into an increasingly strange evening that leaves the bride and groom questioning just what it is they’re celebrating. But there’s no stopping the festivities: the flower girls are running amuck, the bridal party members are preoccupied with their own flailing relationships, and everyone needs to stop ordering the blue drinks. Comedies end in marriage. Tragedies end in death. This play begins with both. 42-45

https://jccstl.com/arts-ideas/new-jewish-theatre/current-productions/
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St. Louis Senior Olympics

Through May 28, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.
phone 314-442-3279
pruben@jccstl.org
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Senior Olympics Signing Up Sportsmen – and Women – 50 or Better! The St. Louis Senior Olympics - an Olympic-style sporting event for men and women age 50 and older – will soon embark on its 40th year. The Games will be held over Memorial Day Weekend 2019 and is a highly visible and organized event with more than 1,200 participants and 300 volunteers. These amazing people are “newbies” and veterans, competitive and fun-seekers, and they join us from nearly 150 neighborhoods across 12 states! We are known as one of the premier Senior Olympics Depending on events

http://stlouisseniorolympics.org
Jewish Community Center (map)
2 Millstone Campus Drive
Maryland Heights
phone 314-432-5700

Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum Military Telephone Exhibit

Wednesdays-Sundays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues through June 30
phone 314-416-8004
jbtelmuseum@yahoo.com

@ Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum, 12 Hancock Ave, St Louis MO 63125
To commemorate the upcoming 75th anniversary of D-Day, the Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum has created an exhibit featuring telephones used by military personnel. Housed in a restored 1896 building, the museum also features an extensive collection of telephones from the early 1900s through the 2000s, hundreds of pieces of telephone-related equipment, memorabilia from 1880s through the 2000s, a wide variety of novelty telephones and much more. It is located in the Jefferson Barracks Park, a 15-minute drive south of downtown. The Jefferson Barracks Telephone Museum has many hands-on, how-things-work exhibits created to inspire an interest in engineering and history. Adults $5; Seniors $4; Children Ages 5-12 $3

http://www.jbtelmuseum.org

New Arrivals

Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 28
phone 314-402-1959
GreenDoorartgallery@aol.com
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Green Door art gallery presents “New Arrivals”. Reception Friday, May 17, from 5-8 pm free and open to the public. Featuring New Originals Drawings by Mary Engelbreit, Terri Shay’s mixed media pieces, sensitive watercolor animals by Jan Helton, pastels by Amy Jamison and including 30 other artists. Available from May 1, thru June 28. 21 N. Gore, www.GreenDoorartgallerycom/events -314-402-1959 Free

http://www.greendoorartgallery.com/events.html
Green Door Art Gallery (map)
21 N. Gore Ave.
Webster Groves
phone 314-402-1959

Burlesque Brunch

Sundays, 12-3 p.m. Continues through June 13
phone 314-436-7000
theboomboomroomstl@gmail.com
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Brunch!!! Who doesn’t love brunch? It’s the best meal of the day and here at The Boom Boom Room, it’s even better with our burlesque show. Join us this Sunday for the ultimate brunch buffet with entertainment featuring the world renowned Boom Boom Bombshells! $35/person for brunch and the show

https://theboomboomroomstl.com/sundayburlesquebrunch/
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