Locations in St. Louis with Slideshow

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    Baileys' Range
    Joining Baileys’ Chocolate Bar, Rooster and the Bridge Tap House & Wine Bar, Baileys’ Range is Dave Bailey’s most ambitious venture to date: He seeks to provide luxe-quality burgers in quantities usually associated with Five Guys or Smashburger. Made from locally sourced, grass-fed beef, the burgers are excellent, whether you order yours unadorned, with cheese or classed up with sautéed mushrooms and Taleggio or meated up with pulled pork. Patties made from lamb, bison, duck, chicken and vegetables are also available. The fries are topnotch, the shakes blended with super-creamy housemade ice cream.
    Bar Les Frères
    Restaurateur Zoë Robinson Pidgeon and her go-to chef Ny Vongsaly have brought a touch of Paris chic to the tiny Clayton confines of their new venture, Bar Les Frères. Though the cuisine is resolutely old-school French, the vibe is fun and the décor (including sixteen pairs of deer antlers looming above the bar) downright funky. The brief menu includes such beloved classics as lobster bisque (brimming with actual lobster meat), duck confit and steak au poivre. The highlight might be the Toulouse-style pork sausages, aggressively seasoned: a perfect blend of pig, salt and spice.
    Basso
    Basso is Italian for low, and this restaurant is located in the cavernous basement of the Restaurant at the Cheshire. Part of the multimillion-dollar renovation of the Cheshire hotel on the western edge of the city, Basso boasts as its chef Patrick Connolly, a St. Louis native who made his name (including a James Beard Foundation award) in Boston and New York City before returning home. His menu is “Italian gastropub,” which in practice means excellent wood-fired pizzas and rustic pasta dishes. The “McDowell’s Golden Arcs,” with speck, delicata squash and Fontina, is a standout pizza. Among the pastas, try the mafalda, thin ribbons of pasta tossed with a beef and pork ragù, pecorino romano and breadcrumbs.
    The Beerhouse
    One of the more surreal dining experiences in St. Louis: a good ol' American bar and grill done up as a Disneyfied Bavarian beer hall, complete with waitresses costumed in fetching frocks a la Snow White. Part of the River City casino, the menu hits the basic goods, including tasty, oversized burgers, wings and ribs (ask for the sauce on the side). But there is also German fare, including a terrific rendition of the classic sauerbraten (here called "German Pot Roast"), tender braised beef over yummy spaetzle and braised red cabbage. Best of all, the friendly bartenders are skilled at a quick pour -- especially when the carnage you suffered at the craps table is written all over your face.
    Big Daddy's-Soulard
    Nestled in the shadows of the A-B Brewery on the south end of Soulard, Big Daddy's offers a little bit of everything for the south city barfly. The downstairs bar features dj's spinning the latest jams every weekend and ice cold beers and tasty appetizers make it a great place to kick back a watch the game. But an inviting outdoor patio and second upstairs bar give the venue range and seasonal charm.
    Billiken Club at Saint Louis University - Busch Student Center
    Over the past few years, the Billiken Club on the campus of Saint Louis University has hosted some of the most sought after and critically-acclaimed indie rock acts, while giving local and regional performers a chance to open for national headliners. Though it doubles as a taco bar and cafeteria by day, a black drape cordons off the performance space from its unusual surroundings. All shows at the Billiken Club are free, and the performers are booked by the university committee, so there's a wide variety of student-sanctioned talent, which makes it a go-to spot for budget-friendly, very now music. It's a hipster mecca, despite the fact that they don't sell any liquor or PBR, just those brews that come with Schlafly or Anheuser-Busch/Inbev logos.
    Billy G's
    Billy G’s, the Kirkwood hot spot, offers something for everyone with its large menu and even larger portions. A significant portion of the menu is Italian, although burgers, sandwiches, and even some southern classics round out the seemingly endless options. Of special note is the pizza, thin crust and cooked to a crispy flakiness in wood oven. The food is average, but the restaurant is always packed to the brim because of its location and self-fulfilling reputation as the place to be seen in Kirkwood. The patio is worth a visit, with several fire features (including a table with a built-in fireplace), cozy semicircle booths, and a large outdoor bar. It’s a lovely spot to reconnect with high school friends for a cocktail on a lovely day or night, just expect the food to be secondary.
    Bistro 1130
    Bistro 1130 brings Mediterranean-inspired cuisine to the shoppers of Town and Country Crossing, albeit with varying degrees of authenticity. Executive chef Karim Bouzammour, a Moroccan native, infuses the menu with specialties from his homeland; Bistro 1130 is at its best when he embraces this rich, North Africa culinary heritage. In particular, the lamb couscous, served in a tagine with assorted vegetables and chickpeas, is the embodiment of authentic Moroccan cuisine. Likewise, do not pass up the fresh sardines when available. These mild, little fish are packed with fresh herbs and drizzled with lemon juice -- an authentic Mediterranean delicacy. Also noteworthy is fig-and-pine-nut-stuffed pork, as well as the excellent phyllo-dough-wrapped goat cheese turnover. Weather permitting, opt for the patio -- Bistro 1130 has a prime, lakeside location.
    BitterSweet Bakery
    Leanna Russo isn't the biggest fan of eating sugar and sweets, but that doesn't mean her Benton Park bakery isn't topnotch. In fact, a light hand with the sweet stuff is what makes Russo's pastries so darn good. The lemon meringue torte with a pine-nut crust and browned Swiss meringue is a lovely blend of sweet and tart with a savory backbeat. Be sure to try the peanut-butter bar, which knocks Reese's out of the park. Savory dishes, including a daily lunch special and made-from-scratch biscuits topped with peppery sausage gravy, are also available.
    BlackFinn American Grille
    A small, higher-end national chain, BlackFinn American Grille (located in the St. Louis Galleria) offers something for everyone, from chicken tenders to crab cakes, fish and chips to Chilean sea bass. Those fish and chips bring tender slabs of haddock in a crisp jacket of deep-fried batter; the fried calamari are pretty good, as is a soft pretzel appetizer. Stop by on your way (or from) the mall's many, many shopping opportunities.
    The Block
    A neighborhood establishment in the contemporary vein, this Old Webster restaurant doubles as a butcher shop: the meats, cut in-house, are also available for retail sale. Even if you never avail yourself of (or even notice) the butcher component, you’ll find that the Block is a significant and refreshing step up from the ubiquitous lowest-common-denominator neighborhood joint. The menu is an appealing array of contemporary American favorites: steak, roast chicken, braised pork, housemaid charcuterie. The steaks (available cuts vary) are grass-fed and beautifully grilled. Pork is a standout, too, especially the “Potted Pi
    Blood & Sand
    Blood & Sand is a members-only restaurant and bar located in an otherwise unremarkable stretch just south of Washington Avenue’s loft district. If you can swing a membership or know someone who has one, you should go. Owners TJ Vytlacil and Adam Frager and chef Chris Bork have created a remarkable venue: not a snobby club, but a community of people who are passionate about good food and good drink. Bork’s menu is seasonal, sophisticated and also playful: a plate of heirloom tomatoes like an abstract-expressionist painting in three dimensions; earthy sweetbreads paired with kimchi made from apple. Vytlacil’s cocktail list nods at tradition while indulging the mixologist’s impressive creativity. Service throughout is topnotch.
    Blueberry Hill
    A true St. Louis landmark, Blueberry Hill has been a hotspot in the Delmar Loop for over 40 years. With pop culture memorabilia lining every nook and cranny, jukeboxes, dart leagues and toys on display, there's fun to be had by people of all ages. The menu features classic American fare like burgers, sandwiches, house-made soups and salads with vegetarian specialties as well. A late night menu is offered after 9 p.m., which includes some daytime favorites in addition to breakfast food. The extensive bar stocks 63 bottled beers and 18 draught taps, both local and imported. With multiple stages spanned across an impressive square footage, Blueberry Hill has plenty of room for touring and local bands alike. The restaurant is open every day of the year for lunch and into the wee hours of the morning, from 11-1:30 a.m.
    Blues City Deli
    From the muffalettas and po' boys on the menu to the concert posters, album covers and photos that cover the walls (look for the shot of owner Vince Valenza from his club-gigging days with music buddy Pennsylvania Slim), Blues City Deli screams New Orleans. Thursday evenings and Saturday afternoons in this Benton Park deli feature free live concerts from blues artists and more. On these days, a line goes out the door and often around the corner. Even if the wait was long, it'd still be worth it for that sweet (or spicy - you choose) "Memphix Stax" pulled pork piled high with slaw, but with an expeditious sandwich assembly line, visitors never have to go hungry for long. Aside from a "soup of the day" and a couple of salads, we're talking all sandwiches, all the time. Grab a quick bite, kick back with a cold beer and soak up some quality local music.
    Bocci Bar
    Bocci Bar, a small-plates wine bar from the owner of BARcelona Tapas restaurant, gives Clayton diners a front-row seat to the hustle and bustle of Central Avenue. The restaurant features an eclectic selection of dishes, ranging from chilled soups to Argentine flank steak. Pan-seared sea scallops with an English pea puree are delicate and well-cooked, while Korean pork is creatively served in a hollowed-out apple. The Parmesan chicken broth is a must-try. The dish features confit chicken legs and thighs with meat so tender that it falls off the bone with only the slightest prodding. The broth is rich and flavorful; kale and rice noodles round out the dish. Bocci has a small but comprehensive wine list with several flights and glass selections available on a rotating basis. Every month, the restaurant offers wines and dishes based on a particular country's theme.
    Bogart's Smokehouse
    Skip Steele grew up in Memphis and has been barbecuing as a hobby and a profession for most of his life. His pedigree includes Super Smokers BBQ, the Memphis in May World Barbecue Championship and local barbecue godhead Pappy's Smokehouse. So, yeah, you should try his new joint. The baby-back ribs are excellent, but venture outside your barbecue comfort zone to try the pastrami or the ethereal smoked prime rib, and you'll be richly rewarded. The pit-baked beans are the standout side, almost worth a visit all by themselves.
    Boodles BBQ
    Jonathan Seitz, who co-founded the local Bandanas Bar-B-Q chain, has moved on — sort of. He and partner Chris Makos have transformed a former Wendy’s in Affton into a barbecue joint. The menu is what you’d expect: pulled pork, pork ribs, beef brisket, chicken and turkey, all smoked over hickory and pecan woods. The ribs are very good, in large part thanks to a nicely balanced dry rub that adds both spice and sweetness. The surprise is the turkey, incredibly tender and flavorful. The fried biscuits, which accompany every platter, have the potential to become an object of cult worship and a destination in themselves.
    Brazikat Brazilian Steak & Seafood House
    Brazikat Brazilian Steak & Seafood House, which occupies a spacious address in Clayton’s Carondelet Plaza development, is a churrascaria, the all-you-can-eat Brazilian steakhouse. More precisely, Brazikat calls itself (and prices itself) like a churrascaria. In fact, the Brazikat experience is no more indicative of Brazilian culture than a bikini wax. The meats, often poorly cut by the “gaucho” servers, taste overwhelmingly of mesquite smoke. As for the seafood, the less said, the better. The "35-item gourmet food bar" is a salad bar. It does not always have 35 items, either — though maybe you’re supposed to count the two containers of croutons separately.
    Bridge Tap House & Wine Bar
    Restaurateur Dave Bailey's The Bridge offers a terrific casual-dining experience in a stylish downtown space. The two-story upscale hideaway in downtown St. Louis celebrates artisanal beers and wines and craft cocktails. Artsy lighting and a sumptuous wooden bar create a classically beautiful atmosphere you won’t soon want to leave. The menu intensely focuses on creative small plates, snacks, charcuterie and cheese, sandwiches, salads and small entrees. The decor, especially the giant bird's-nest light fixtures, is, frankly, awesome.
    Broadway Oyster Bar
    A true taste of N'awlins awaits you at this party-time Cajun/Creole dive, housed in a 150-year-old historic building in the shadows of Busch Stadium and downtown. Order up a mess of crawfish, fried alligator, jambalaya or gumbo (the house recipe, known as Gumbo Ya Ya, is mixed with shrimp, chicken and andouille sausage), or go for one of the five grinders or five varieties of oysters on the half-shell. The Big Easy ain't just found in the flavors, though: Broadway Oyster Bar is also a great place to see national jazz, blues and zydeco acts seven days a week. Nowhere else in town can you eat gator meat and oysters and hear live music. The regulars know it, and they pack the bar so full it makes you wonder if N'awlins natives aren't coming up here for a slice o' blues, St. Louis-style. Laissez le bon temps rouler, indeed.
    It's our brand-spankin' new stadium, and we couldn't be more excited. Home of the National League's finest, the St. Louis Cardinals, Busch Stadium is ground zero for Redbirds fans. Tours are available (call for details), and while the building is too new to have much history, it's just a matter of time.

Best Things to Do In St. Louis

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