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"Eat Rite or Don't Eat At All." So it says on the coffee cups (and the souvenir T-shirts) at this no-frills 24-hour greasy spoon amid the industrial wasteland between downtown and Soulard. Folks come from miles around to fill up on the breakfast-and-burgers menu: bar-hoppers and club kids finally coming down from their late-night-into-early-morning highs; factory workers and blue-collars getting off graveyard shifts; curious newcomers who've heard about the bizarro vibe that pervades these cramped counter-only environs. To call the food at Eat-Rite cheap is an understatement -- six burgers (real-size, not White Castle-size) run $4.50. And many swear by the Eat-Rite's redoubtable slinger (for the uninitiated, that'd be fried eggs, hash browns and a burger patty, avec chili).
There is a sandwich board on the north side of the 600 block of Pine Street downtown that advertises a generous portion of the lunch menu for the Edible Difference, whose door is conveniently located right behind the sign. Inside, diners will find a large deli menu behind a lunch counter specializing in sandwiches and salads for workers on the go. In addition to their chicken salad, tuna salad, egg salad and club sandwiches, the Edible Difference offers an array of selections for making your own bread, meat and cheese creation. They also serve quiches, chili and soup, including a vegetarian three-bean. Their morning breakfasts include eggs, bagels and muffins. After ordering at the counter, you can take a seat or step to the side and wait, but not too long, for a meal to go. Take note, there is a five-dollar minimum for credit cards.
No relation to the world's most brilliant scientist, Einstein Bros. Bagels actually was created by the Boston Market company in 1995 as a way to market breakfast food. It now holds the title of the largest retail bagel store in the nation, with nearly 800 stores. Classic bagel flavors like plain, pumpernickel, and "everything," plus more nouveau varieties like spinach florentine, green chile, and chocolate chip, are all baked in-store daily, ready and willing to be sliced, toasted, and augmented with cream cheese "shmears" in a variety of sweet and savory flavors. For St. Louis carb-lovers seeking a bit more substance, Einstein Bros. also offers bagel sandwiches for breakfast and lunch topped with everything from lox and cream cheese to turkey and avocado, plus bagel dogs and pizza bagels that are head and shoulders above the miniscule microwavable variety. You don't have to be a genius to find your local Einstein Bros. on Voice Places.
Located at 20th and Locust streets, in the former home of Nectar and the Rocket Bar before that, El Borracho combines the look and design of a lively cantina with the drinks and food of a resort and still maintains the familiar center bar with tables along the circumference. The menu offers the usual suspects in Mexican fare - quesadillas, burritos and tacos, but everything is served family style. Tacos can be ordered pancho or gringo style, depending on preference.
During the frigid winter months, this 20,000-seat arena is the Blues' home sweet home. But every now and again, the ice makes way for monumental showstoppers with jaw-dropping stage set-ups (think Springsteen, Lady Gaga or Nine Inch Nails, and yes, even The Bieber). Concertgoers looking for the VIP experience can rack up seats in 91 suites, 1,700 club seats and seven party rooms.
Namaste. Greetings and welcome to lunch. Everest's return to the downtown area, now located in the former Union Trust Building on Olive Street just west of Seventh Street, provides patrons with a quick, filling and healthy midday meal. Open from 11:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on weekdays, Everest does have a full menu with appetizers, soups and salads, and several vegetarian and meat entrees, but their typical diner swarms to the buffet line, which offers the opportunity for Nepalese, Indian and Korean food to tastefully share a plate. Around seven different dishes are available, with typical vegetable options such as korma and kimchi keeping warm next to chicken and noodle trays. White or Nepalese-style fried rice are offered, along with steaming hot naan and a ladle of garlicky, aromatic daal to complement your meal. Diners can also make donations to the Himalayan Family Healthcare Project, dedicated to serving the healthcare needs of the people of Nepal.
14 total results

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