Locations in St. Louis with Slideshow

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    The Pageant
    The Pageant is St. Louis' premier midsize venue, with plenty of space to sit or stand, and enough stage room and lighting options to please even the most theatrical of bands. The venue hosts the best touring national acts from pop to indie rock, hip-hop to jazz and blues. Standing tall as the center piece of the burgeoning East Loop strip on Delmar, the venue is a sure bet for a great night in the city.
    Pan D'Olive
    Pan D'Olive takes over the swank Franz Park address that Mihalis Chophouse vacated a few years ago. The space still looks like a million bucks, but this Mediterranean restaurant (mostly Italian, with a few Greek, Turkish and southern French touches) carries a decidedly less upscale price tag. Only a few entrées cross the $20 mark, and more than dozen appetizers are priced $10 or less. Dishes include shareable plates like hummus, fried calamari and arancini. Entrées feature crowd-pleasers: pastas, a massive lamb shank, a charbroiled rib-eye steak. A humble dish of baked cannelloni conveys surprising soul thanks to its hearty Bolognese sauce and properly made béchamel.
    Panorama
    After a series of bad press and financial difficulties, the team behind Panorama at the Saint Louis Art Museum knew they had to make some changes. As part of their reinvention efforts, they brought in a new general manager, a new chef and changed the menu to better reflect the tastes of St. Louis diners. Their efforts paid off. The new (and much improved) Panorama features dressed-up classic dishes, such as apricot baked brie, beef carpaccio and a grilled chicken Waldorf salad. Panorama’s menu also includes several excellent vegetarian options, such as the hearty Ozark Forest mushroom melt and the zucchini, kale and mushroom platter. The croque-madame, overstuffed with thinly shaved ham and accented with apples and sage, is topped with melted Gruyere, béchamel sauce and an over easy egg for an excellent lunch or brunch option. Panorama’s menu also includes several entrees, such as a Burgundy braised short rib, beef tenderloin and grilled chicken. The vegetarian autumn zucchini, kale and mushroom platter, served over goat-cheese polenta, is a must-try, even for meat-eaters. Panorama serves brunch on Sunday, with a menu that includes smoked salmon benedict and decadent stuffed French toast. With its tasty food, gorgeous setting and stunning view, Panorama is a delicious dining destination.
    Pastaria
    Acclaimed chef Gerard Craft (Niche, Brasserie by Niche, Taste) turns his attention to Italian cuisine at Pastaria, a large, bustling fun restaurant in downtown Clayton. The cuisine is simple, affordable and -- for the price (nothing over $20) -- outrageously good. Pasta, made in house, features in dishes both simple (the sublime chitarra: spaghetti-like noodles with olive oil, garlic and red pepper flakes) to the sexy and sophisticated (the luscious pistachio ravioli). Pizzas are made in the Neapolitan-style, on a thin crust and cooked very quickly in a very hot oven. You can opt for an American style pepperoni pie (the meat cured by the restaurant) or a more ambitious pizza with Brussels sprouts, lemon, bechamel sauce and lardo. Save room for dessert, especially the gelati. Craft, with executive chef Adam Altnether and executive sous chef Brian Moxey, has created another gem. There are no reservations; expect a wait.
    Peel Wood Fired Pizza
    A wood-burning oven is the centerpiece of this restaurant, quite popular in Edwardsville and worth the trip across the river from St. Louis. From that oven come thin-crust pizzas both simple and sophisticated. The "Prosciutto" is an elegant pie with fingerling potatoes, roasted garlic and rosemary joining the cured pork. The "Jerk Chicken" is more playful, a tasty variation on barbecue-chicken pizza. The wings, roasted in the oven, are excellent, whether as an appetizer or an entrée.
    Perennial Artisan Ales
    Perennial Artisan Ales is more than a beloved microbrewery -- its tasting room offers small plates and snacks, too. Wash that pumpkin hummus tartine down with a chamomile-infused Saison de Lis, or pair a sausage sandwich with a tall, cold Aria Ale.
    Piccadilly at Manhattan
    The Collida family opened the original Piccadilly at Manhattan in the 1920s. Nick and Maggie Collida undertook a major renovation and reopened it in late 2007. The neighborhood spirit remains, friendly and familial, and the food is fun. The fried chicken is very good, and the burger might steal the show: a fat patty (or two), beautifully charred, thicker at the center than around the edges. If barbecue is available, splurge on a half or even a whole slab of meaty baby-back ribs.
    Pint Size Bakery & Coffee
    Pint Size Bakery requires no introduction. Surely by now you've tasted one of its outstanding oatmeal cream pies. If for some reason you haven't had a chance to stop by, here are some examples of what you might find: savory scones dotted with local Canadian bacon from Todd Geisert Farms, cheddar jack cheese and thyme grown in whiskey barrels right outside the bakery; bacon caramel corn made with kernels from YellowTree Farm; brookies (brownies with a cookie in the center, a homage to Brooklyn's renowned bakeshop/cookbook bestsellers, Baked NYC); housemade syrups to flavor iced Kaldi's lattes; and whatever else mastermind Christy Augustin and her team of formally trained pastry chefs feel like whipping up. Pint Size bakes small batches in a tight space, but don't let the name mislead you: It has some big ideas and isn't afraid to pull them off.
    Pizzeria Tivoli
    Pizzeria Tivoli opened in July 2010 on Kingshighway in the Princeton Heights neighborhood. The restaurant offers a shotgun-style bistro setting inside its cozy dining room and patio seating in the front and along the side. Menu choices include a small selection of salads and starters and, for the main event, a variety of thin-crust, wood-fired pizzas. The usual suspects such as margherita pizza make appearances, but Pizzeria Tivoli also has unique choices such as their namesake pizza "Tivoli," which features tomato, artichoke hearts, chicken and red peppers, and the "Villa d'Este," which approximates the experience of eating a gyro.
    Planter's House
    Finally, master mixologist Ted Kilgore gets a house of his own with Planter’s House. This Lafayette Square temple to mixology is a showroom for Kilgore and company’s (wife, Jamie, and business partner, Ted Charak) inspired cocktail artistry. Drinks run the gamut from the approachable “Planter’s House Punch” to the esoteric wormwood-laden “Unusual Suspect.” The joint is, first and foremost, a cocktail room, but it features an inspired food menu. The poutine is magnificent -- thick, red-wine pork gravy covers a platter of fried and smashed fingerling potatoes. Or try the duck burger, a mammoth mix of ground duck, pork and bacon is served open-face on a pumpernickel bun with Gouda and a fried duck egg. It’s quite possibly the perfect way to soak up all of that booze.
    Plush
    With 40,000 square feet to play with, Plush is a truly unique bar, restaurant, and music venue located just east of Grand Center in Midtown. You can sit down most nights of the week and enjoy a menu full of eclectic American food that borders on greasy spoon but with modern twists (meatloaf cupcakes, for example). Dinner and lunch are served from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, with kitchen hours extending to 1 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. And Brunch lovers can hit up Plush on Sundays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Whichever meal you choose, a variety of coffee and espresso drinks, as well as a full selection of beers, wines, and cocktails are available. Plush’s venue side has music several nights each week, while the second floor houses a smaller room for more intimate shows along with pool and ping-pong tables. Plush also has two spaces - a second-floor parlor and the building’s fourth-floor penthouse – both available for private events. RFT named Plush the "Best New Bar" in 2012, and things have only gotten better for this jack-of-all-trades, one-of-a-kind establishment.
    The Post Sports Bar & Grill
    A fun and very laidback sports bar replete with tasty grub and cold beer. TV monitors and (mostly) St. Louis sports memorabilia cram the walls, while the requisite snacks - chicken wings, pizza, burgers - fill your tummy. The wings are good: spicy, meaty and crisp-skinned. You can also order the "Blazin' Chicken Dip," which folds together chicken, Buffalo sauce and cheese. Burgers are simply adorned and tasty, while pizzas are amply loaded with cheese and toppings. Stop in for happy hour Monday through Friday for 4 to 7 p.m. and start planning your fantasy sports team strategies.
    The first Missouri outpost for a small, Chicago-based chain of restaurants, Prasino features contemporary American cuisine while adhering to an environmentally conscious philosophy. The menu features a broad spectrum of dishes, from flatbreads to sushi to St. Louis-style pork steak. Especially noteworthy are the pork belly and scallop tacos, a fun, fusion-style interpretation of a classic Mexican dish. Another must-try are the beef short ribs, simmered for hours in a truffled Cabernet mushroom sauce – this refined comfort food is the perfect dish for a cool evening. The large bar at Prasino provides a lively spot to sample fresh sushi and eclectic small plates over seasonal cocktails. While food and service can be a bit inconsistent, depending on the size of the crowd, Prasino provides a nice alternative to the large chains that overpopulate the St. Charles area.
    Prime 1000
    This splashy loft-district restaurant is no stodgy cigars-and-Cabernet steakhouse. To be sure, the menu offers top-notch steaks - your choice of dry-aged USDA Prime or grass-fed Missouri cuts - but these can be paired, for example, with a butter blended with sea urchin. Appetizers include more contemporary flourishes like crisp sweetbreads and a "trio" of tenderloin carpaccio; those dragged here by carnivore friends can order the non-steak entrées with great confidence. Be sure to check out the dry-aging chamber to the left of the host's stand to see molecular gastronomy in action.
    The Purple Martin
    Long-time Fox Park residents Brooke Roseberry and Tony Lagouranis dreamed of creating a neighborhood gathering place. They've finally gotten their wish with the Purple Martin. Located in a rehabbed corner storefront, the restaurant is a quaint, casual bistro with Mediterranean and North African fare. Appetizers such as skordalia, a tangy garlic dip, and zeal, a lima-bean-based Berber specialty, serve as zesty starters, while the lamb shank with roasted tomatoes and potatoes is a satisfying entree. Make sure to save room for dessert. The Napoleon, layers of buttery puff pastry, sweet cream and macerated blackberries is a decadent end to a meal. For those who prefer an adult beverage as a nightcap, the Purple Martin boasts a creative cocktail menu. Its namesake drink, a concoction of Fitz’s grape soda, Malibu rum and lime juice, is a sweet and refreshing treat.

Best Things to Do In St. Louis

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