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Located in the spacious, open lobby of the Merchant's Laclede building, which also happens to be home to the boutique, luxurious Hilton hotel, 400 Olive offers diners an upscale casual dining experience. This "urban grille" takes advantage of its location by placing diners in an elevated corner of the hotel's atmospheric charm. Lunch options include pastas, burgers and sandwiches, including a grilled crab cake sandwich and a seared tuna sandwich. Dinner entrees feature a filet, a rib eye and a tuna steak, as well as a maple-glazed pork loin and a macadamia nut-crusted salmon. 400 Olive also prepares an Amber Bock onion soup, with gruyère and provolone cheeses, and a cheesecake, savory not sweet, of smoked trout, served with an onion relish. Coffee and various desserts are also available.
Al's Restaurant Just north of the flashy Lumière Place downtown lies Al's Restaurant, which has enjoyed its home along the riverfront for 85 years. The upscale restaurant serves all the perennial favorites, including escargot, lobster tails and steak tartar for starters. Al's only serves dinner, which offers a selection of steaks such as steak Diane and filet mignon or the "Italian Dinner" -- a filet alongside veal parmigiano. Not in the mood for steak? No problem: Al's also offers a variety of veal preparations, pork chops seafood and duck breast among their entrees. Reservations are recommended.
Bohemian meets upper crust when the Bommarito family of five-diamond Tony's fame shakes things up at suppertime. Anthony's Bar extends its power-lunch reputation beyond the dinner hour with appetizers like a pulled pork tamale and entrées like herb-stuffed salmon and a grilled porkchop with roasted tomatoes and potatoes. The menu is brief and reasonably priced, the atmosphere casual -- if frozen in a ´70s time warp. As at Tony's, expect great attention to the food and service (the two restaurants share a kitchen).
Steven Caravelli, formerly executive chef at Hubert Keller's steak house Sleek, now mans the kitchen at Araka. The menu retains a focus on the cuisines of Europe's Mediterranean coast, though Caravelli intends to home in on local produce and sustainable meat and seafood. New dishes include seared diver scallops with pork belly and a quail egg, a "duo" of local beef and a "tartare" made from beets. Standard and vegetarian tasting menus are available.
Basso is Italian for low, and this restaurant is located in the cavernous basement of the Restaurant at the Cheshire. Part of the multimillion-dollar renovation of the Cheshire hotel on the western edge of the city, Basso boasts as its chef Patrick Connolly, a St. Louis native who made his name (including a James Beard Foundation award) in Boston and New York City before returning home. His menu is “Italian gastropub,” which in practice means excellent wood-fired pizzas and rustic pasta dishes. The “McDowell’s Golden Arcs,” with speck, delicata squash and Fontina, is a standout pizza. Among the pastas, try the mafalda, thin ribbons of pasta tossed with a beef and pork ragù, pecorino romano and breadcrumbs.
A neighborhood restaurant with a menu overseen by (very) prominent - and (very) busy - local chef Mike Johnson. Dishes draw inspiration from Mediterranean cuisines, not only European, but also North African and Middle Eastern. Crab cakes are spiced with za'atar and served with a harissa aioli; falafel is served in bite-size "popcorn" form. The menu is dominated by small plates, but there are also sandwiches, soups and flatbread pizzas, as well as a few pasta dishes and traditional entrées. Weather permitting, the patio is a popular seat.
Blood & Sand is a members-only restaurant and bar located in an otherwise unremarkable stretch just south of Washington Avenue’s loft district. If you can swing a membership or know someone who has one, you should go. Owners TJ Vytlacil and Adam Frager and chef Chris Bork have created a remarkable venue: not a snobby club, but a community of people who are passionate about good food and good drink. Bork’s menu is seasonal, sophisticated and also playful: a plate of heirloom tomatoes like an abstract-expressionist painting in three dimensions; earthy sweetbreads paired with kimchi made from apple. Vytlacil’s cocktail list nods at tradition while indulging the mixologist’s impressive creativity. Service throughout is topnotch.
Bocci Bar, a small-plates wine bar from the owner of BARcelona Tapas restaurant, gives Clayton diners a front-row seat to the hustle and bustle of Central Avenue. The restaurant features an eclectic selection of dishes, ranging from chilled soups to Argentine flank steak. Pan-seared sea scallops with an English pea puree are delicate and well-cooked, while Korean pork is creatively served in a hollowed-out apple. The Parmesan chicken broth is a must-try. The dish features confit chicken legs and thighs with meat so tender that it falls off the bone with only the slightest prodding. The broth is rich and flavorful; kale and rice noodles round out the dish. Bocci has a small but comprehensive wine list with several flights and glass selections available on a rotating basis. Every month, the restaurant offers wines and dishes based on a particular country's theme.
Gerard Craft strikes again. The acclaimed young chef has reinvented the venerable Central West End French restaurant Chez Leon (which relocated to Clayton) as a casual mecca for your favorite French dishes, from the cheese-crusted crock of onion soup to a killer cassoulet. The prices are reasonable, the dishes unpretentious. The emphasis here is on good ingredients prepared with skill and care rather than showy technique. Consider the meltingly tender beef short ribs or a tender piece of salmon paired with braised leeks and lentils. Appetizers include very good pork ptés. The beer list is excellent.
Brazikat Brazilian Steak & Seafood House, which occupies a spacious address in Clayton’s Carondelet Plaza development, is a churrascaria, the all-you-can-eat Brazilian steakhouse. More precisely, Brazikat calls itself (and prices itself) like a churrascaria. In fact, the Brazikat experience is no more indicative of Brazilian culture than a bikini wax. The meats, often poorly cut by the “gaucho” servers, taste overwhelmingly of mesquite smoke. As for the seafood, the less said, the better. The "35-item gourmet food bar" is a salad bar. It does not always have 35 items, either — though maybe you’re supposed to count the two containers of croutons separately.
Inside the Hyatt Regency at the Arch, the Brewhouse offers a bit of history alongside its beer and grub selection. A board outside alerts diners of each day's beers on tap. The "Owner's Box" is available for private parties. The walls are covered with TVs and photos that celebrate St. Louis sports history. As its name implies, the Brewhouse is serious about beer, with a hefty selection of lagers and ales ranging from Bud Light to Trois Pistoles and plenty in between. If the list overwhelms, opt for the "pick six," and the bartender will choose for you. Chicken strips, toasted ravioli and potato skins, sandwiches and salads, burgers (beef, veggie or turkey) available with two, three or four patties, or, for those who like a challenge, go for the "Tower of Doom" - twelve (yep, twelve) four-ounce patties, a half-pound of bacon, a half-pound of cheese, jalapeños and barbecue sauce. Anyone who can finish this mammoth in 30 minutes or less gets a T-shirt and their burger for free. Other entrees include bangers and mash and fish and chips as well as nightly specials.
The second outpost of Hubert Keller's Burger Bar concept (the original is in Las Vegas) is one of the acclaimed chef's two restaurants in the Lumiere casino complex. Burger Bar offers countless variations on the standard burger, with nearly four dozen different toppings -- from different cheeses, bacons and vegetables to cranberry sauce, marinated anchovies and even foie gras -- to go with several different kinds of beef, as well as bison, turkey and a vegetable patty. "American Kobe" beef is luscious, but expensive. The menu features six "Chef's Burgers" designed by the kitchen, including the $60 Rossini: American Kobe beef with foie gras, shaved black truffle and a Madeira sauce.
California Pizza Kitchen originated in Beverly Hills in 1985, riding the "California cuisine" wave that would come to define the culinary decade; the company now boasts 250 locations of casual sit-down eateries with modern, neutral decor and a casual-yet-upscale feel. A pioneer of envelope-pushing fusion pizzas, the chain claims to have invented the now-ubiquitous barbecue chicken pizza, an anchor of a menu that offers pies topped with everything from Thai-spiced chicken with peanut sauce and bean sprouts to bacon, avocado and mayo-dressed lettuce on three different crust options: original, honey-wheat or thin and crispy. Besides the namesake pizzas, CPK offers hungry St. Louis diners a full menu of "California twist[s] on global flavors" including enormous salads like the Spago-inspired Chinese Chicken and a so-right-now Quinoa and Arugula, plus other globe-trotting items ranging from "Tuscan" hummus and tortilla soup to fish tacos and cedar-plank salmon. California Pizza Kitchen is easy to find on Voice Places.
California Pizza Kitchen originated in Beverly Hills in 1985, riding the "California cuisine" wave that would come to define the culinary decade; the company now boasts 250 locations of casual sit-down eateries with modern, neutral decor and a casual-yet-upscale feel. A pioneer of envelope-pushing fusion pizzas, the chain claims to have invented the now-ubiquitous barbecue chicken pizza, an anchor of a menu that offers pies topped with everything from Thai-spiced chicken with peanut sauce and bean sprouts to bacon, avocado and mayo-dressed lettuce on three different crust options: original, honey-wheat or thin and crispy. Besides the namesake pizzas, CPK offers hungry St. Louis diners a full menu of "California twist[s] on global flavors" including enormous salads like the Spago-inspired Chinese Chicken and a so-right-now Quinoa and Arugula, plus other globe-trotting items ranging from "Tuscan" hummus and tortilla soup to fish tacos and cedar-plank salmon. California Pizza Kitchen is easy to find on Voice Places.
Top-quality meat and a bona fide big-city atmosphere, but you certainly pay for the privilege. The restaurant takes up most of the ground floor of what used to be the four-story, stainless-steel-clad American Zinc Building. Be sure to take note of the miracle of engineering -- more than 50 feet of unbroken space, made possible with something called Vierendeel trusses -- that creates an open, modern atmosphere, tempered by a giant original mural across one wall. Great steaks -- even better if you're on an expense account.
66 total results

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