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In the heart of Soulard, 1860 Saloon, Game Room and Hardshell Cafe serves up traditional, delicious fare, plus cajun and creole food. Customer favorites include our Famous Crab Cakes and Homemade Chicken Strips. The oysters, cajun pasta, pizzas and burgers are always a great choice. Enjoy a reasonably priced meal and drinks before taking the complimentary shuttle to Cardinals and Blues games. You can enjoy live Blues, Classic Rock, R&B, and Motown bands 365 days a year in the 1860 Saloon. Play foosball, pool and more in the Game Room. The third area, the Hardshell Café, also has a full bar, ample seating, and a several hundred gallon fish tank. There is lovely outside dining where fur babies are always welcome!
Bohemian meets upper crust when the Bommarito family of five-diamond Tony's fame shakes things up at suppertime. Anthony's Bar extends its power-lunch reputation beyond the dinner hour with appetizers like a pulled pork tamale and entrées like herb-stuffed salmon and a grilled porkchop with roasted tomatoes and potatoes. The menu is brief and reasonably priced, the atmosphere casual -- if frozen in a ´70s time warp. As at Tony's, expect great attention to the food and service (the two restaurants share a kitchen).
Some bars are content to offer clean glasses and booze, without gimmicks or an ounce of entertainment. Not so Bar 101; this Soulard joint "gets it all in," to borrow a term from the hip hop playbook. Outside, there's a giant sand volleyball court and about a million square feet of patio space with a large outdoor bar and fire pit. Inside, flat screens blare with in-house adverts and food porn that's bound to make your beer-filled tummy rumble, along with myriad games including basketball and a feat-of-strength boxing game. It's either a mini-Dave and Busters or an adult-friendly Chuck E. Cheese -- only instead of fake gold coins, your prize will be booze. Or maybe a stunning victory on the volleyball court. The menu features traditional bar food (cheese sticks, nachos) alongside unexpected choices (spinach-artichoke Rangoon, battered gator).
The second outpost of Hubert Keller's Burger Bar concept (the original is in Las Vegas) is one of the acclaimed chef's two restaurants in the Lumiere casino complex. Burger Bar offers countless variations on the standard burger, with nearly four dozen different toppings -- from different cheeses, bacons and vegetables to cranberry sauce, marinated anchovies and even foie gras -- to go with several different kinds of beef, as well as bison, turkey and a vegetable patty. "American Kobe" beef is luscious, but expensive. The menu features six "Chef's Burgers" designed by the kitchen, including the $60 Rossini: American Kobe beef with foie gras, shaved black truffle and a Madeira sauce.
Located in the heart of Soulard, Carsons is known mainly as a go-to karaoke stop on weekend nights. The cozy atmosphere and laid back crowd make it an easy place to grab the mic and cut loose on the small stage. When the off-tune crooning becomes unbearable, make your way to the large patio to sip that Bud Select al fresco. But this delightful dive offers great prices on cold brews all week long making it a great happy hour spot as well.
Located on the first floor of the Westin downtown and a stone's throw from Busch Stadium, Clark Street Grill offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. Breakfast includes the standard options -- French toast, a build-your-own omelet -- and a "SuperFoods" menu, which highlights healthy ingredients, including blueberry orange granola pancakes. Lunch offers a simple selection of salads, sandwiches and pizzas, while dinner brings upscale options such as duck confit-and-pear salad, with entrées including pasta, Chilean sea bass and beef tenderloin. Clark Street Grill also offers a bar menu with appetizers and a small selection of casual fare.
A visually odd north-county gem, Coltranes surprises its guests with intriguing patrons and a nautical theme. (The space calls to mind the interior of a private boat, with wood paneling and portholes throughout.) There are a plethora of pool tables and a pretty rockin' jukebox. And while anywhere else, a wall of mirrors might seem seedy or strange, at Coltranes, it's actually a fun detail that creates a mirage of additional space. If you're a lady, don't you dare miss General Ladies' Night every Wednesday; Coltranes also offers karaoke every Saturday.
Courtesy Diner has the look and feel of a classic diner complete with vinyl seats and checkerboard tiles. Diners can opt for a table or go for counter service to get the full effect. The fare includes diner favorites - burgers, eggs,a patty melt, a slinger and the "Devil's Delight," two eggs, hash browns, chili and toast.
The Courtesy Diner, like the Dude, abides. Whether you want a hearty breakfast to soak up last night's drinks, a late-night slinger to forestall the morning hangover, the best fast-food hamburger in town or a fix of cheap coffee and jukebox blues to stir your brooding soul, you'll find it here - just like you would have found it twenty, thirty, even forty years ago. Best of all, the Courtesy Diner is not an attic for Americana, and it isn't some kind of shrine to the working class; it's a working restaurant (and be prepared to pay with cash).
Riverport's self-proclaimed "largest dining and entertainment extravaganza in Missouri" is like Chuck E. Cheese on growth hormones. On weekends, a tram service takes you from the vast parking lot to a structure so big they give you a map in the lobby. Inside, the place throbs like a hangover after a three-day debauch in Vegas. Dinner in the Grand Dining Room -- a posh enclave richly appointed with Tiffanyesque fixtures, dark wood and white linen -- exceeds expectations: The charbroiled sirloin is good and garlicky, and the barbecued pork ribs are wonderful.
Around 1 p.m. on any given weekday, there are approximately 90 men and two women having lunch at DB's. Since this bar calls a self-effacing little brick building on a stretch of throwaway, near-abandoned street home -- meaning most patrons consider DB's a dining destination -- this ranks as a small phenomenon. But DB's gives its clientele what it wants. A TV set in every corner blares 24-hour sports programming, while waitresses swan around in teeny T's or outfits that require multiple modifiers: itsy-bitsy, neon-pink, strapless, Lycra. Weekend nights find DB's with a boisterous crowd and the ladies clad in naught but lacy underthings—it's as close as you'll get to a skin show on this side of the river. The menu is mostly straight-up bar food -- including DB's Famous, an open-faced sandwich made with melted Provel and ham atop French bread that's actually quite tasty. Surprisingly, there's also a touch of the down-home, thanks to daily, blue-plate-style specials like meat loaf, lasagna or roast beef. What, no breast of chicken?
57 total results

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