Locations in St. Louis

Clear Filters
Loading...
279 results
    Asia
    Asia reflects only a sliver of the titular continent's size and cultural variety. Instead it focuses on those countries many might think of when they hear the phrase "Asian cuisine": China, Japan, Vietnam and Thailand. Sushi is prepared well, though the fish itself is merely good, not outstanding. Entrées lean toward Chinese and Chinese-American dishes like General Tso's chicken; house specialties include Peking duck and an excellent Cornish hen dish. The Cornish hen is one of the few values on a relatively high-priced menu.
    Atomic Cowboy
    A decade ago when Chip Schloss finished rehabbing the building at 4140 Manchester, Atomic Cowboy became a pioneer of the Grove's booming nightlife scene. Today, Atomic Cowboy is known for music performances every night of the week and a creative fresh mex menu. Food includes sweet potato empanadas with jalapeno cream, gaucho fries topped with chili con carne, Mexican spaghetti with chorizo meatballs, and all the burritos, enchiladas and quesadillas you can imagine. With a huge outdoor patio and firepit in addition to a full bar both inside and outside, Atomic Cowboy is a suitable place to let loose all year round. Food and drink specials are offered every Monday through Friday from 4-7 p.m. at happy hour. Other drink specials include $1 PBR nights and $0.50 Stag nights. Brunch is also served every Sunday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and features huevos benedict with smoked salmon, a Mexican slinger, tres leches french toast and hot Kaldi's coffee to wash it all down.
    Attitudes
    The Grove is host to many alternative night clubs, but none quite like Attitudes. As St. Louis' oldest LGBT nightclub, this veteran hotspot certainly knows how to throw a party. Wednesday nights feature karaoke and a $10 all-you-can-drink special, while hip-hop night is the best way to bounce 'til 3 a.m. on Thursdays; Friday night drag shows are followed by a non-stop all night dance party on Saturdays. Between rounds of cutting a rug in the cage or on the dance floor, try the "Dueling DJ" or the "Diamond," two of the wettest, wildest concoctions 'tudes has to offer. There's a reason why Attitude's has oft been voted "St. Louis' Best Gay and Lesbian Night Club" -- it's a consistently energetic place for party people of all ages and orientations. Any of the uber-friendly staff members can tell you that. Just make sure that you keep any drama under wraps, or you might see an even sassier side of them. After all, it is called "Attitudes" for a reason.
    Audi-K's
    From its cozy storefront in the Central West End neighborhood, Audi-K's serves up more than 25 different kinds of hot dogs. Options include the Chicago dog (or, if you prefer, the St. Louis dog - with barbecue sauce, pickles and onions), the BLT dog and the restaurant's namesake dog, which features cream cheese dressing and grilled onions. Audi-K's also serves veggie dogs. Beyond the buns, Audi-K's offers nachos, salads and breakfast items including a breakfast burrito and a build-a-breakfast sandwich with the choice of bread and meat along with egg and cheese.
    Specializing in New York-style pizza, Bridge & Tunnel serves up a straightforward pizza menu with classic toppings and a few specialty toppings such as artichoke hearts and feta. Other items include calzones, stromboli and salads. The fast-casual setting offers downtown diners a quick lunch option before heading back to work or after catching a game. Weekend bar-goers can stop by for a bite to help soak up the alcohol -- Bridge & Tunnel stays open until 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.
    Baida
    Baida dishes traditional Moroccan cuisine from its South Grand storefront. Featuring family recipes, owners Abder and Assia Meskine give patrons an authentic taste of their homeland through classic dishes. The menu features a variety of couscous preparations such a vegetable, chicken, lamb or beef, which are enlivened with a side of broth. Baida also serves several different tajine dishes, all presented in the traditional clay cooking vessel. Appetizers, such as loubia, a spiced white bean stew, and bastilla, a sweet and savory chicken pie, serve as delicious starters to the meal. However, the m’lwee steals the show. This rich meat pie is nothing short of spectacular -- layers of flaky phyllo dough wrapped around the most succulent kefta, or ground beef, one could imagine. The kefta is seasoned with garlic, cumin and coriander and is slow cooked so that the spices infuse the meat’s juices. This rich, meaty mixture is encased in the buttery phyllo pouch, which is pan fried to give it a subtle nuttiness. One could end the meal satisfied here, but the briwat, a pastry of almond and honey similar to baklava, caps off the meal with a tasty sweet touch. Check it out for lunch or dinner for a taste of Casablanca.
    Baileys' Chocolate Bar
    Located at 1915 Park in the heart of the idyllic Lafayette Square neighborhood, Bailey’s Chocolate Bar serves up some of the city’s best desserts and cocktails, in addition to a small but stellar selection of savory offerings. Thanks to its dim lighting and the rich browns and reds that dominate the interior, Bailey’s Chocolate Bar is well-known as one of the city's most romantic spots. Selections range from classic desserts like crème brûlée and Bailey’s strawberry sundae to more contemporary creations like their vegan banana split made with strawberry sorbet, as well as a variety of house-made ice creams and truffles. Savory offerings include sandwiches, salads and pizzettas, and a sizeable selection of fine cheeses. The bar serves up a bevy of beers, wines, spirits, and specialty cocktails – your sweet tooth will thank you.
    Bar 101 Soulard
    Some bars are content to offer clean glasses and booze, without gimmicks or an ounce of entertainment. Not so Bar 101; this Soulard joint "gets it all in," to borrow a term from the hip hop playbook. Outside, there's a giant sand volleyball court and about a million square feet of patio space with a large outdoor bar and fire pit. Inside, flat screens blare with in-house adverts and food porn that's bound to make your beer-filled tummy rumble, along with myriad games including basketball and a feat-of-strength boxing game. It's either a mini-Dave and Busters or an adult-friendly Chuck E. Cheese -- only instead of fake gold coins, your prize will be booze. Or maybe a stunning victory on the volleyball court. The menu features traditional bar food (cheese sticks, nachos) alongside unexpected choices (spinach-artichoke Rangoon, battered gator).
    Bar Louie-Central West End
    Is Bar Louie a swank cocktail lounge or a neighborhood bar and grill? Depends on when you show up. The Chicago-based chain occupies a massive space in the Central West End, and when it's filled with the young and the beautiful on a weekend night, it's got spark. Stop by for lunch or an early dinner, though, and you may feel lonely. Stick with the basics: sandwiches, burgers and fish tacos. Chase your meal with a beer or martini and watch the pretty people play.
    Bar Louie-Kirkwood
    Is Bar Louie a swank cocktail lounge or a neighborhood bar and grill? Depends on when you show up. The Chicago-based chain occupies a massive space in the Central West End, and when it's filled with the young and the beautiful on a weekend night, it's got spark. Stop by for lunch or an early dinner, though, and you may feel lonely. Stick with the basics: sandwiches, burgers and fish tacos. Chase your meal with a beer or martini and watch the pretty people play.
    Barbarella
    For some, this place will always be the Jade Room (the awning out front even says so). It's no longer a dim neighborhood dive, the Jade Room got an uber-mod facelift in late 2009 and was renamed Barbarella, after the iconic 1968 film. The décor of incites nostalgia and wonder -- lava lamps mingle with the orange and blue geometric curves that span the walls, with designs by local artists Joseph Raglani and Jeremy Kannapell. The dim lighting and illuminating glow of nearby flat screen TVs plays well to the sci-fi aura of Barbarella. Test your inner nerd at Geek Trivia or indulge in science fiction films, including bar-favorite Dr. Who. After hours appetizers like crab rangoon and chicken curry are served until 2 a.m., thanks to the kitchen of the adjoining Mekong Restaurant.
    BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups
    In a town with as many blues enthusiasts as St. Louis, the question of which blues club is best can be a topic of spirited discussion. BB's Jazz, Blues and Soups inhabits a historic brick buildings that oozes atmosphere, and it offers a first-rate selection of local and touring performers. BB's features a varied schedule of musical acts, a large year-round seating capacity and full-service kitchen specializing in Cajun and Creole food, in addition to a selection of American bar food.
    Beale on Broadway
    The Beale on Broadway home to live blues, soul and R&B seven nights a week 'til 3am.
    Behrmann's Tavern is the second oldest bar in St. Louis still doing business under its original name (Failoni's being the first). Open on the southside since the mid-1930s, this small neighborhood bar is well steeped in history. There's a vintage bowling machine that's survived since the 1950's, faded black and white photographs showing the evolution of St. Louis baseball stadiums and monuments and a pizza oven next to the bar that may or may not be original to the place. You're not likely to find young people at the bar, which is a shame, because the wizened regulars have stories to tell.
    Big A's on the Riverfront
    The ceilings are very, very high at St. Charles' Big A's on the Riverfront, which is a good thing: It affords more room on the very, very tall walls for the eatery's collection of beer and sports memorabilia. The restaurant serves good, satisfying bar fare - burgers, chicken Phillies, some pretty amazing waffle fries - and hosts drink specials most nights of the week. The venue has a clean, friendly vibe and cheery service, making it a fine spot for a bite, a drink, or both.
    Biggie's
    A neighborhood bar & grill in the finest St. Louis tradition. The pork chop is the trademark dish: It weighs in at one pound and requires 25 minutes to cook. Burgers and sandwiches are satisfying, especially the veal parm. The menu includes steaks, seafood and Italian dishes, including pizza, in the Provel-intensive St. Louis style. (Not a fan of T-ravs? Biggie's might convert you.) Barbecue ribs are the weekend specialty. The atmosphere is friendly, and there's more sports memorabilia on the walls than you could study in a dozen visits.
    The Bistro at Grand Center
    Mid-priced bistro fare is served here, with eclectic influences ranging from the Basque country to the Caribbean. A good excuse to go to Grand Center for something other than a show or the symphony.
    Blackberry Cafe
    Most coffeehouses pour a good, strong cup of joe. Others have great atmosphere, and a few serve appealing food. Blackberry, a hangout that's popular among Washington University undergrads, delivers all three. Blackberry's espressos and lattes go down smooth and sock you with enough caffeine to keep you wide-eyed as you bang out that overdue lit paper. And you won't have to exist on java alone: Blackberry has a surprisingly extensive menu of Mediterranean and American fare, such as hummus, baba ghanouj, tabbouleh, wraps, pizzas and sandwiches.
    BlackFinn American Grille
    A small, higher-end national chain, BlackFinn American Grille (located in the St. Louis Galleria) offers something for everyone, from chicken tenders to crab cakes, fish and chips to Chilean sea bass. Those fish and chips bring tender slabs of haddock in a crisp jacket of deep-fried batter; the fried calamari are pretty good, as is a soft pretzel appetizer. Stop by on your way (or from) the mall's many, many shopping opportunities.
    Blind Tiger
    Though Blind Tiger only opened in December 2013, it has already established itself as a prominent Maplewood bar and restaurant. Located at 7376 Manchester - just a few doors away from owner Michael McLaughlin’s other digs, The Crow’s Nest - Blind Tiger specializes in pizza, ribs and whiskey. The bar features more than 15 bourbons, eight ryes, six Irish whiskeys, two Canadians, nine scotches and three local Missouri whiskeys. The eight beers on tap are all local, with some out-of-state bottles also available. It also has a small cocktail list that changes every month. The menu features soups, salad, polenta, ribs, wings and pizza. Specialty za crusts include a New York style, which is totally vegan, and a St. Louis style, which is gluten free. Blind Tiger also offers deliveries for those who live close enough. Still in its early stages, Blind Tiger is working to book more DJs and bands at the in-house venue, in addition to private events, whiskey tastings and even weddings.
    Blueberry Hill
    A true St. Louis landmark, Blueberry Hill has been a hotspot in the Delmar Loop for over 40 years. With pop culture memorabilia lining every nook and cranny, jukeboxes, dart leagues and toys on display, there's fun to be had by people of all ages. The menu features classic American fare like burgers, sandwiches, house-made soups and salads with vegetarian specialties as well. A late night menu is offered after 9 p.m., which includes some daytime favorites in addition to breakfast food. The extensive bar stocks 63 bottled beers and 18 draught taps, both local and imported. With multiple stages spanned across an impressive square footage, Blueberry Hill has plenty of room for touring and local bands alike. The restaurant is open every day of the year for lunch and into the wee hours of the morning, from 11-1:30 a.m.

Best Things to Do In St. Louis

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.

© 2019 Riverfront Times

Website powered by Foundation