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801 Chophouse’s super-size steaks are the most expensive meal in town — and that seems to be the point. The restaurant peddles opulence to holders of corporate cards, as well as regular folks who want to feel like royalty (at least for a day). For the price tag, diners will receive impeccable service, fine wines and shamefully large cuts of beef. Bone-in selections are the best offerings: The strip, rib eye, pork and veal all benefit from the extra flavor (and thicker cut). 801 Chophouse offers a variety of steak enhancements, from Oscar-style with crab and béarnaise to a bone-marrow bath. However, the high-quality steaks and chops are delicious enough on their own. Seafood is incredibly fresh, and the oysters taste straight from the coast. Side dishes are served a la carte: The creamy scalloped potatoes and lobster macaroni & cheese are excellent options — just make sure to ask for a half order so you can save room for the Grand Mariner soufflé.
The vast space inside Big Daddy's on the Landing houses more than just one huge party. It also offers pub grub such as potato skins, chicken tenders and "little pieces of heaven" - breaded Monterey-jack cheese sticks. Main courses include sandwiches, salads, wraps and burgers, such as the "Big Mamajama" - a half-pound burger drenched in Maull's barbecue sauce and topped with bacon and cheddar. Big Daddy's also offers specials every night.
Club Amnesia is hardly different from its predecessor Lure --the basic layout is the same, the Thursday night crowd is the same -- but the increased security (male and female pat-downs, mandatory $3 coat check for every patron) ensures that Amnesia is not following in Lure's flawed footsteps. The weekend cover can be steep at $10, and the line to get in can be long, but we'll be damned if it isn't the most fun you'll ever have. Nowhere else do we find the meat-market scene so appealing: The weaves are fabulous, the hip hop is bangin' and every single song elicits fervent cries of "This my JAM!"
CLOSED AS OF JUNE 2011. At the Complex, St. Louis' largest gay dance club, hooking up is a high priority. But even that takes a back seat during the over-the-top weekly drag shows. The mood and music can vary from room to room, but no matter which bar you choose, the all-you-can-drink specials are hard to beat.
Element serves up hearty rustic American food in a beautifully restored historic brick building in Lafayette Square. The two-story, warmly rich space is filled with glass and wood and features an open kitchen in the lower level restaurant area so that every table feels like a chef’s table. Element is a casual fine dining restaurant that serves contemporary American cuisine in a luxurious space complete with an award-winning outdoor terrace. The menu changes often. There's a spectacular lounge located on the third floor, perfect for those who like cocktails with a view.
Europe Nightclub looks like a fortress from the outside. Located just behind the City Museum, Europe has 2 floors, Gothic touches and a staff of pretty young things who couldn't be less interested in getting you a drink. But few clubs in St. Louis can hold a candle to Europe when you're talking serious dance music -- this is the new home for the Home Nightclub crowd and for B&W Productions' rotating cast of trance and dance demi-gods like Paul Oakenfold and Bad Boy Bill. The second floor offers a stellar view of the action on the dance floor, a separate bar, and white leather booths gone celestial with tiny points of green laser light decorating the booths and their occupants.
The Fox Theatre deserves every bit of its "fabulous" reputation - it's a cathedral for the arts, and any seat in the house is prime for worship. The exquisite ceilings and ornate Siamese Byzantine decor alone will impress even the most jaded concert-goers, and its grandiose fabulousity is often mentioned by the performers who grace its illustrious stage. The grand theater, with its spiraling staircases and tiered seating, is the perfect host to both Broadway spectaculars and big-name musical acts.
Former Cardinals center fielder Jim Edmonds and business partner Mark Winfield hit a home run with Jim Edmonds 15 Steakhouse, an upscale steak house and lounge. The brief menu features excellent steaks, of course - the dry-aged strip is worth the extra scratch - but the kitchen lavishes attention on every element of the menu, including non-steak entrées and desserts. The people-watching in the surprisingly small dining room is excellent (and even better in the lounge areas). Upstairs from the restaurant, Club 15 is a dimly lit room where pretty young things and the guys who lust after them toss back vodka Red Bulls in plastic cups and get busy on the dance floor. Exposed brick and red lights will make you feel like you're partying in someone's loft, though the ambiance is minimal at best. DJs spin a variety of hip-hop and Top 40, and the young crowd seems ready to party all night.
Lucas Park Grille was the first restaurant to call Washington Avenue home just after the 2004 loft district revitalization. The swank hub of Washington Avenue nightlife might not be synonymous with foie gras and $40 steaks, and if it's sedate, mannerly high-end dining that you seek, look elsewhere. Its perfectly executed new American cuisine is served up on large and small plates in a large and elegant industrial space filled with stone, copper and brick and several warm fireplaces for a cozy winter spot. An award-winning wine list includes over 300 selections. On the weekends, the bar is bursting at the seams with togged up revelers sporting their finest and throwing back calorie-friendly beer and rainbow colored shots. You'll find an electric atmosphere and some of the best people-watching in town.
This 7,000-square-foot nightclub is snow-white inside, with minimalist white leather benches for those with the scrill for bottle service. The chosen ones sit on an elevated level overlooking the club, and a VIP bar peeps out from behind gauzy white drapes. A trip to the bathroom will banish any illusions imparted by the swanky all-white decor, however: Like most places with a packed dance floor, the loo at Lure frequently runs out of paper towels -- and unless you're getting bottle service, your $10 Grey Goose cocktail comes in a plastic cup. Still, the DJ's are solid, the crowd is rowdy in the best way possible, and you won't leave Lure without witnessing at least one awesome dance-off.
Nathalie Pettus brings the bounty of her Overlook Farms to the Central West End at Nathalie’s. The restaurant is truly farm-to-table: Nearly all of the ingredients, including the meat, are sourced directly from Overlook, hand-selected by Pettus and chef Jimmy Voss. Through his eclectic menu, Voss takes diners on a culinary world tour. There’s classic French, represented by rich and tender coq au vin; Greek moussaka al forno; Middle Eastern style vegetable kofta; and feijoda, the national dish of Brazil. The pate maison should not be missed. The house-made beef-liver pate is flecked with hazelnuts and served with a red-onion jam and traditional accompaniments. The food is only part of the story at Nathalie’s. The building, a magnificent 19th-century mansion, is one of the most ornate dining rooms in town. Venetian chandeliers hang from the ceilings, gold paint trims the walls and red roses decorate the white linen-clothed tables of the dining salons. (The term “dining room” just doesn’t do the space justice.) Even the restrooms are a sight to behold -- there’s even a marble fireplace in the ladies’ room. It’s a sight to behold.
After a series of bad press and financial difficulties, the team behind Panorama at the Saint Louis Art Museum knew they had to make some changes. As part of their reinvention efforts, they brought in a new general manager, a new chef and changed the menu to better reflect the tastes of St. Louis diners. Their efforts paid off. The new (and much improved) Panorama features dressed-up classic dishes, such as apricot baked brie, beef carpaccio and a grilled chicken Waldorf salad. Panorama’s menu also includes several excellent vegetarian options, such as the hearty Ozark Forest mushroom melt and the zucchini, kale and mushroom platter. The croque-madame, overstuffed with thinly shaved ham and accented with apples and sage, is topped with melted Gruyere, béchamel sauce and an over easy egg for an excellent lunch or brunch option. Panorama’s menu also includes several entrees, such as a Burgundy braised short rib, beef tenderloin and grilled chicken. The vegetarian autumn zucchini, kale and mushroom platter, served over goat-cheese polenta, is a must-try, even for meat-eaters. Panorama serves brunch on Sunday, with a menu that includes smoked salmon benedict and decadent stuffed French toast. With its tasty food, gorgeous setting and stunning view, Panorama is a delicious dining destination.
There are many reasons to relish a trip to Powell Symphony Hall in Midtown. There's the beautiful old edifice, a converted movie palace restored to gorgeous splendor, from the gold leaf in the domed ceiling to the Art Deco proscenium and the plush crimson seats and carpet. There's the excited buzz in the lobby, where the monied old codgers whose donations keep the building open rub elbows (if unintentionally) with the college kids who scored $10 rush tickets -- all of them dressed in their finest because a Saturday-night performance here is an event. There's the orchestra, a rich, well-tuned instrument, one of the finest in the U.S. And then there's musical director David Robertson. An accomplished musician who has received armfuls of awards and whose conducting skills are in demand all over the world.
The first Missouri outpost for a small, Chicago-based chain of restaurants, Prasino features contemporary American cuisine while adhering to an environmentally conscious philosophy. The menu features a broad spectrum of dishes, from flatbreads to sushi to St. Louis-style pork steak. Especially noteworthy are the pork belly and scallop tacos, a fun, fusion-style interpretation of a classic Mexican dish. Another must-try are the beef short ribs, simmered for hours in a truffled Cabernet mushroom sauce – this refined comfort food is the perfect dish for a cool evening. The large bar at Prasino provides a lively spot to sample fresh sushi and eclectic small plates over seasonal cocktails. While food and service can be a bit inconsistent, depending on the size of the crowd, Prasino provides a nice alternative to the large chains that overpopulate the St. Charles area.
17 total results

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