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Baida dishes traditional Moroccan cuisine from its South Grand storefront. Featuring family recipes, owners Abder and Assia Meskine give patrons an authentic taste of their homeland through classic dishes. The menu features a variety of couscous preparations such a vegetable, chicken, lamb or beef, which are enlivened with a side of broth. Baida also serves several different tajine dishes, all presented in the traditional clay cooking vessel. Appetizers, such as loubia, a spiced white bean stew, and bastilla, a sweet and savory chicken pie, serve as delicious starters to the meal. However, the m’lwee steals the show. This rich meat pie is nothing short of spectacular -- layers of flaky phyllo dough wrapped around the most succulent kefta, or ground beef, one could imagine. The kefta is seasoned with garlic, cumin and coriander and is slow cooked so that the spices infuse the meat’s juices. This rich, meaty mixture is encased in the buttery phyllo pouch, which is pan fried to give it a subtle nuttiness. One could end the meal satisfied here, but the briwat, a pastry of almond and honey similar to baklava, caps off the meal with a tasty sweet touch. Check it out for lunch or dinner for a taste of Casablanca.
It's easy to drive past Bek-Hee without giving the place a second glance. Set amid strip malls and budget apartment complexes on Page Avenue, the restaurant blends into the north county landscape as "just another chop suey joint." That’s not completely inaccurate. Bek Hee's menu contains all of the Chinese greasy-spoon staples: St. Paul sandwiches, hot braised chicken, pork fried rice with gravy. However, hidden among these inauthentic dishes are some traditional gems that, when word gets out, will put Bek Hee on the map. The small restaurant is owned by the Lin family, expats from Sha County in China, that is famous for its culinary tradition -- legend has it, Sha's cooking style descends directly from the Han royal family that fled to Sha in 221 AD. Some Sha-style gems on Bek-Hee's menu include the housemade pork egg rolls and vegetarian spring rolls, both made from scratch (including the wonton wrappers), overstuffed and fried to a crisp golden brown. The homemade dumplings are also a must try -- the pork filled gems are delicious in their own right, but the accompanying "dumpling sauce," a Lin family secret recipe, is divine. Also noteworthy are the house special lo mein and the Singapore chow mei fun, both made with homemade noodles. Bek-Hee proves why Sha cooking is fit for a king.
Brazikat Brazilian Steak & Seafood House, which occupies a spacious address in Clayton’s Carondelet Plaza development, is a churrascaria, the all-you-can-eat Brazilian steakhouse. More precisely, Brazikat calls itself (and prices itself) like a churrascaria. In fact, the Brazikat experience is no more indicative of Brazilian culture than a bikini wax. The meats, often poorly cut by the “gaucho” servers, taste overwhelmingly of mesquite smoke. As for the seafood, the less said, the better. The "35-item gourmet food bar" is a salad bar. It does not always have 35 items, either — though maybe you’re supposed to count the two containers of croutons separately.
California Pizza Kitchen originated in Beverly Hills in 1985, riding the "California cuisine" wave that would come to define the culinary decade; the company now boasts 250 locations of casual sit-down eateries with modern, neutral decor and a casual-yet-upscale feel. A pioneer of envelope-pushing fusion pizzas, the chain claims to have invented the now-ubiquitous barbecue chicken pizza, an anchor of a menu that offers pies topped with everything from Thai-spiced chicken with peanut sauce and bean sprouts to bacon, avocado and mayo-dressed lettuce on three different crust options: original, honey-wheat or thin and crispy. Besides the namesake pizzas, CPK offers hungry St. Louis diners a full menu of "California twist[s] on global flavors" including enormous salads like the Spago-inspired Chinese Chicken and a so-right-now Quinoa and Arugula, plus other globe-trotting items ranging from "Tuscan" hummus and tortilla soup to fish tacos and cedar-plank salmon. California Pizza Kitchen is easy to find on Voice Places.
California Pizza Kitchen originated in Beverly Hills in 1985, riding the "California cuisine" wave that would come to define the culinary decade; the company now boasts 250 locations of casual sit-down eateries with modern, neutral decor and a casual-yet-upscale feel. A pioneer of envelope-pushing fusion pizzas, the chain claims to have invented the now-ubiquitous barbecue chicken pizza, an anchor of a menu that offers pies topped with everything from Thai-spiced chicken with peanut sauce and bean sprouts to bacon, avocado and mayo-dressed lettuce on three different crust options: original, honey-wheat or thin and crispy. Besides the namesake pizzas, CPK offers hungry St. Louis diners a full menu of "California twist[s] on global flavors" including enormous salads like the Spago-inspired Chinese Chicken and a so-right-now Quinoa and Arugula, plus other globe-trotting items ranging from "Tuscan" hummus and tortilla soup to fish tacos and cedar-plank salmon. California Pizza Kitchen is easy to find on Voice Places.
Cheesecake Factory is a national restaurant chain serving continental American and Italian cuisine. This location is connected to the St. Louis Galleria, with interior and exterior mall entrances.
Drive way south on Grand and you'll find a Mexican restaurant where a great vibe foreshadows a great meal. Nestled in the sleepy Carondelet neighborhood, Chimichanga's sticks out like the best kind of sore thumb. You can take a seat on the always-packed patio, festooned with bright umbrellas and white Christmas lights, or settle into a booth in the primary-color dining room. The no-frills food is delicious, particularly when it involves smoky house-made salsa or fork-tender grilled pork. Tasty margaritas come in three sizes, with small meaning "not quite enough," medium meaning "perfect" and large meaning "this thing oughta come with a diving board."
Domino's is the first (and possibly the last) pizza delivery chain to ever run an entirely self-deprecating ad campaign. After a 2009 consumer taste survey placed its pizza dead last, the Ann Arbor, Michigan-based corporation embarked on a quest to reinvent its pies, running commercials in which customers compared the crust to cardboard but then illustrated how the chain's "chefs" were improving things. Domino's new and improved garlic butter-y "hand tossed" crust is offered alongside deep dish, thin crust, and a newer "Brooklyn style" option, with wings, breadsticks, cheesy bread, pasta, sandwiches, and desserts rounding out the menu at its more than 10,000 stores, including several in St. Louis. 2011 saw the introduction of "Artisan pizzas" with topping combos like spinach and feta. Though Domino's freely admits on the pizza box that "We are not artisans," each one is nonetheless hand-signed by its maker. Voice Places is your guide to local Domino's.
Just a stone's throw away to the south of the lovely River Des Peres is the Chippewa location of St. Louis' answer to Mexican dining, El Maguey. This smaller location in south St. Louis, near Lindenwood Park and Shrewsbury, gets crowded most nights during dinner hours. The menu includes several steak and chicken meals, such as "Steak Mexicano," a T-bone with onions, tomatoes and peppers, "Steak El Maguey," a rib eye cooked with mushrooms, peppers, onions and tomatoes, or "Pollo Michoacano," a grilled chicken breast with chorizo and melted cheese. El Maguey also offers burritos, enchiladas, fajitas and quesadillas, as well as numerous combination plates.
The downtown location of India Palace may lack its sister restaurant’s aesthetic charm, but what it lacks in atmosphere it makes up for in flavor. The extensive menu is filled with classic Indian dishes such as the rich navratan korma and tangy chicken tikka masala. The lamb vindaloo is a must-try. Hunks of tender lamb are simmered in a spicy tomato sauce that is not for the faint of heart, but its potpourri of exotic spices make the dish multidimensional. The dark horse of the menu, however, is the aloo palak, a mix of skillet-fried potatoes, garlicky spinach, onions and coriander seeds. It’s such a simple dish, but its perfect execution make it magical. Monday through Saturday, India Palace puts on a respectable lunch buffet. The kitchen keeps the steam table filled with a rotation of its house specialties, giving diners a chance to sample a variety of the same dishes that it serves at night. It’s a great way for the uninitiated to sample a spectrum of items before flying blindly at dinner — or for those overwhelmed with too many excellent choices to have a taste of everything.
63 total results

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