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The original 6 North Coffee Company, located in the Central West End neighborhood, (the other is downtown) prides itself in being local and independent. The family-owned and -operated café, which is open Monday through Friday, serves Kaldi's Coffee, another locally owned company. The menu reflects typical coffee-shop fare, with lattes and mochas to drink and salads, soups and sandwiches to eat. 6 North also offers catering and box lunches.
The downtown location of 6 North Café offers a full menu of lunch and breakfast items. Located at 701 Market Street in the Gateway One building, patrons can enter the ground floor café at the corner of Eighth and Chestnut streets. The locally owned 6 North features Kaldi's coffee and loose teas, as well as assorted pastries, bagels and breakfast sandwiches in the morning. Lunch options include hot and cold sandwiches, wraps, salads and daily soups. 6 North also sells fruit, coffee and tea, smoothies, and box lunches catering to downtown offices. Plenty of indoor seating is available offering an upscale coffeehouse ambiance, with additional outdoor tables and chairs along Chestnut Street for fair-weather dining.
When Dan and Pat Graham decided to shutter Graham’s Grill & Bayou Bar last December after a seventeen-year run, the next generation decided to take over the reins - but put their own stamp on things. Brother and sister business partners Devin and Alison converted their parents’ Cajun-themed bar and grill into 612 Kitchen & Cocktails, a 1920s-inspired cocktail lounge and gastropub. The restaurant is at its best when it sticks to classic bar fare: Sausage and cheese stuffed mushrooms, breaded and fried, make for an excellent snack; beer-battered fish and chips pair nicely with a cold one; and the smoked chicken is juicy and glazed with caramelized barbecue sauce. Craft cocktails are on the approachable end of the spectrum. Signature drinks such include the "Great Gatsby,” made with cucumber and basil-infused rum, lemonade and blueberry puree. A bridal shower in barware, the “Coco Chanel,” is a blend of strawberry vodka, lemon juice, pink champagne, strawberries and mint. The most austere offering — and that is a stretch — is the “Scarface.” Tequila, tomato water, triple sec and lavender-infused sour combine to make an interesting twist on the margarita. Regardless of how the younger Grahams brand it, 612 Kitchen & Cocktails is still a simple neighborhood watering hole.
801 Chophouse’s super-size steaks are the most expensive meal in town — and that seems to be the point. The restaurant peddles opulence to holders of corporate cards, as well as regular folks who want to feel like royalty (at least for a day). For the price tag, diners will receive impeccable service, fine wines and shamefully large cuts of beef. Bone-in selections are the best offerings: The strip, rib eye, pork and veal all benefit from the extra flavor (and thicker cut). 801 Chophouse offers a variety of steak enhancements, from Oscar-style with crab and béarnaise to a bone-marrow bath. However, the high-quality steaks and chops are delicious enough on their own. Seafood is incredibly fresh, and the oysters taste straight from the coast. Side dishes are served a la carte: The creamy scalloped potatoes and lobster macaroni & cheese are excellent options — just make sure to ask for a half order so you can save room for the Grand Mariner soufflé.
With a nod toward the vintage cafeteria, Applegate's Deli in Brentwood specializes in sandwiches, salads and soups, and also serves up the slow-smoked meats of Dickey's Barbecue Pit. Sandwich options include chicken salad, turkey and swiss, club or a made-to-order veggie, all prepared on wheat bread or in a wrap. Among the daily soups, diners can choose from chicken and rice, broccoli and cheese, chili and others, as well as lobster bisque on Tuesdays and Fridays. Salad options include a chef's salad, with turkey, ham, cranberries and mixed veggies, Southwest chicken and garden salads. Applegate's offers box lunches that include options such as pasta salad, creamy coleslaw and mixed fruit. In addition to the typical lunch items, Applegate's offers a host of breakfast options, such as biscuits and gravy, breakfast croissant sandwiches and a breakfast pizza. The deli also dishes out a number of local dessert favorites, including Jilly's cupcakes and Dad's cookies.
Tucked amid the bodegas and indie record stores of Cherokee Street sits Athlete Eats, a polished little café that is all about healthy eating. Owner Simon Lusky started the business as a nutrition service, providing meal plans and prepared foods to health-conscious clients, including some of the St. Louis Cardinals players, and expanded to include a breakfast and lunch counter. Athlete Eats offers a variety of juices, smoothies and guilt-free fare, including Carolina-style barbecue; a juicy, locally raised grass-fed beef burger; and hearty salads. One of the more creative offerings, the bibimbap bowl, replaces the traditional sticky rice with caulirice — grated pieces of roasted cauliflower that resembles small rice grains. Tossed with edamame, shiitakes and thinly sliced spiced beef, it’s as good, if not better, than the traditional, rice-based Korean staple. Athlete Eats only serves breakfast on Saturdays and Sundays — a shame because it’s where some of the restaurant’s best items are showcased. The gluten-free pancakes, laden with cinnamon and topped with coconut cream and maple orange syrup, are so tasty that one doesn’t miss the flour. And do not leave without trying Athlete Eats’ breakfast take on the Gerber sandwich: a garlic-studded waffle is topped with shaved ham, Provel cheese, béchamel sauce and a sunny-side egg. It’s one of the best uses of waffles in town.
For some, this place will always be the Jade Room (the awning out front even says so). It's no longer a dim neighborhood dive, the Jade Room got an uber-mod facelift in late 2009 and was renamed Barbarella, after the iconic 1968 film. The décor of incites nostalgia and wonder -- lava lamps mingle with the orange and blue geometric curves that span the walls, with designs by local artists Joseph Raglani and Jeremy Kannapell. The dim lighting and illuminating glow of nearby flat screen TVs plays well to the sci-fi aura of Barbarella. Test your inner nerd at Geek Trivia or indulge in science fiction films, including bar-favorite Dr. Who. After hours appetizers like crab rangoon and chicken curry are served until 2 a.m., thanks to the kitchen of the adjoining Mekong Restaurant.
Basso is Italian for low, and this restaurant is located in the cavernous basement of the Restaurant at the Cheshire. Part of the multimillion-dollar renovation of the Cheshire hotel on the western edge of the city, Basso boasts as its chef Patrick Connolly, a St. Louis native who made his name (including a James Beard Foundation award) in Boston and New York City before returning home. His menu is “Italian gastropub,” which in practice means excellent wood-fired pizzas and rustic pasta dishes. The “McDowell’s Golden Arcs,” with speck, delicata squash and Fontina, is a standout pizza. Among the pastas, try the mafalda, thin ribbons of pasta tossed with a beef and pork ragù, pecorino romano and breadcrumbs.
Billy G’s, the Kirkwood hot spot, offers something for everyone with its large menu and even larger portions. A significant portion of the menu is Italian, although burgers, sandwiches, and even some southern classics round out the seemingly endless options. Of special note is the pizza, thin crust and cooked to a crispy flakiness in wood oven. The food is average, but the restaurant is always packed to the brim because of its location and self-fulfilling reputation as the place to be seen in Kirkwood. The patio is worth a visit, with several fire features (including a table with a built-in fireplace), cozy semicircle booths, and a large outdoor bar. It’s a lovely spot to reconnect with high school friends for a cocktail on a lovely day or night, just expect the food to be secondary.
Owner Ben Bishop Jr. wanted to create a restaurant that would pay homage to Chesterfield’s roots. The result of his efforts is Bishop’s Post, a restaurant that touts “classic comfort fare,” but feels more like an American-style bistro. Bishop’s Post is a comfortable, beautiful restaurant, and its lush, landscaped patio — complete with a waterfall — is one of the loveliest in town. Food, however, is inconsistent. Appetizers range from a delicious sweet-corn and roasted green-chile tamale to a beef tenderloin bruschetta with caramelized onions, roasted garlic and Asiago cheese that is so tender it melts in the mouth. Entrees include a variety of steaks and chops, as well as bistro classics such as grilled duck breast and sautéed quail-breast medallions. Execution is spotty, but the setting and service are worth a drink and appetizer at happy hour.
Bocci Bar, a small-plates wine bar from the owner of BARcelona Tapas restaurant, gives Clayton diners a front-row seat to the hustle and bustle of Central Avenue. The restaurant features an eclectic selection of dishes, ranging from chilled soups to Argentine flank steak. Pan-seared sea scallops with an English pea puree are delicate and well-cooked, while Korean pork is creatively served in a hollowed-out apple. The Parmesan chicken broth is a must-try. The dish features confit chicken legs and thighs with meat so tender that it falls off the bone with only the slightest prodding. The broth is rich and flavorful; kale and rice noodles round out the dish. Bocci has a small but comprehensive wine list with several flights and glass selections available on a rotating basis. Every month, the restaurant offers wines and dishes based on a particular country's theme.
Inside the Hyatt Regency at the Arch, the Brewhouse offers a bit of history alongside its beer and grub selection. A board outside alerts diners of each day's beers on tap. The "Owner's Box" is available for private parties. The walls are covered with TVs and photos that celebrate St. Louis sports history. As its name implies, the Brewhouse is serious about beer, with a hefty selection of lagers and ales ranging from Bud Light to Trois Pistoles and plenty in between. If the list overwhelms, opt for the "pick six," and the bartender will choose for you. Chicken strips, toasted ravioli and potato skins, sandwiches and salads, burgers (beef, veggie or turkey) available with two, three or four patties, or, for those who like a challenge, go for the "Tower of Doom" - twelve (yep, twelve) four-ounce patties, a half-pound of bacon, a half-pound of cheese, jalapeños and barbecue sauce. Anyone who can finish this mammoth in 30 minutes or less gets a T-shirt and their burger for free. Other entrees include bangers and mash and fish and chips as well as nightly specials.
CLOSED - Bubble teas, originated in Taiwan in the 1980s, are lightly sweetened, milk-based drinks. Bubba Tea & Café in downtown St. Louis sells their creamy concoctions in more than two dozen different flavors, including lychee, cantaloupe and avocado. Teas can be orders on the rocks, slushed or hot, and, for an extra fee, with a handful of those little, black tapioca balls. Their full drink menu also includes several coffee and tea beverages. More than just a beverage counter, Bubba offers a breakfast menu featuring croissant, panini and bagel sandwiches, as well as a full lunch menu with wraps, salads and sandwiches. Their pizza panini is served on grilled white bread and comes with Provel cheese, tomato sauce, pepperoni and your choice of two other toppings. They offer plenty of café seating indoors and a few tables outside along Tenth Street.
84 total results

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