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    2720 Cherokee Performing Arts Center
    A central nighttime oases on Cherokee Street, this 20,000-square-foot behemoth features an ArtDimensions gallery on the second floor as just one element of its three stories full of neon lights and art. Hula hoopers, festive events and food trucks are no stranger to this popular weekend party pit. 2720 Cherokee brings in world-renowned DJs and dub steppers as well as a variety of reggaeton and miscellany to blast through a great big sound system, so expect to see ravers commingling with hipsters and hippies -- a truly utopian experience for the colorful club-hopper.
    Bar 101 Soulard
    Some bars are content to offer clean glasses and booze, without gimmicks or an ounce of entertainment. Not so Bar 101; this Soulard joint "gets it all in," to borrow a term from the hip hop playbook. Outside, there's a giant sand volleyball court and about a million square feet of patio space with a large outdoor bar and fire pit. Inside, flat screens blare with in-house adverts and food porn that's bound to make your beer-filled tummy rumble, along with myriad games including basketball and a feat-of-strength boxing game. It's either a mini-Dave and Busters or an adult-friendly Chuck E. Cheese -- only instead of fake gold coins, your prize will be booze. Or maybe a stunning victory on the volleyball court. The menu features traditional bar food (cheese sticks, nachos) alongside unexpected choices (spinach-artichoke Rangoon, battered gator).
    Barbarella
    For some, this place will always be the Jade Room (the awning out front even says so). It's no longer a dim neighborhood dive, the Jade Room got an uber-mod facelift in late 2009 and was renamed Barbarella, after the iconic 1968 film. The décor of incites nostalgia and wonder -- lava lamps mingle with the orange and blue geometric curves that span the walls, with designs by local artists Joseph Raglani and Jeremy Kannapell. The dim lighting and illuminating glow of nearby flat screen TVs plays well to the sci-fi aura of Barbarella. Test your inner nerd at Geek Trivia or indulge in science fiction films, including bar-favorite Dr. Who. After hours appetizers like crab rangoon and chicken curry are served until 2 a.m., thanks to the kitchen of the adjoining Mekong Restaurant.
    Blind Tiger
    Though Blind Tiger only opened in December 2013, it has already established itself as a prominent Maplewood bar and restaurant. Located at 7376 Manchester - just a few doors away from owner Michael McLaughlin’s other digs, The Crow’s Nest - Blind Tiger specializes in pizza, ribs and whiskey. The bar features more than 15 bourbons, eight ryes, six Irish whiskeys, two Canadians, nine scotches and three local Missouri whiskeys. The eight beers on tap are all local, with some out-of-state bottles also available. It also has a small cocktail list that changes every month. The menu features soups, salad, polenta, ribs, wings and pizza. Specialty za crusts include a New York style, which is totally vegan, and a St. Louis style, which is gluten free. Blind Tiger also offers deliveries for those who live close enough. Still in its early stages, Blind Tiger is working to book more DJs and bands at the in-house venue, in addition to private events, whiskey tastings and even weddings.
    Club Amnesia
    Club Amnesia is hardly different from its predecessor Lure --the basic layout is the same, the Thursday night crowd is the same -- but the increased security (male and female pat-downs, mandatory $3 coat check for every patron) ensures that Amnesia is not following in Lure's flawed footsteps. The weekend cover can be steep at $10, and the line to get in can be long, but we'll be damned if it isn't the most fun you'll ever have. Nowhere else do we find the meat-market scene so appealing: The weaves are fabulous, the hip hop is bangin' and every single song elicits fervent cries of "This my JAM!"
    The Crack Fox
    At The Crack Fox, visitors can feel free to let their freak flag fly or simply play the role of a leisurely standby. All are welcome at this eclectic downtown dive -- just don't be surprised to see anything from burlesque and drag performances one night to bondage and gotchic industrial garb the next. EDM spins, karaoke, open mics, metal shows and more also make up the list of participatory alternative entertainment offered here, and there's a huge selection of beer and handcrafted cocktails to wash it all down with. Take, for instance, the "ginger snap" made with ginger vodka, cinnamon Schnapps and lemonade. Come in to pick your poison and meet the cast of friendly fun-loving regulars, and don't forget to bring an open mind.
    The Dubliner
    The Dubliner brings an authentic Irish pub experience to Washington Avenue, with one catch: it's too big and too loft-like to pass for the real thing, but those in the mood for a pint of Guinness and a bit of craic won't mind. The menu offers hearty traditional fare, much of it sourced from local farms: beef short ribs braised in stout, a Guinness stew, lamb, fish and chips - and lots and lots of potatoes. Stop in for brunch and enjoy an authentic Irish breakfast, with homemade blood sausage. If restaurant partner Eddie Neill is on the premises, he will greet you enthusiastically with open arms. And to top it off, a few of Eddie's favorite French wines were recommended to pair with our plate.
    The Loft
    Olive Street is lined with tricked out Escalades and cruisers on Saturday nights, and men and women shoulder their way into the packed house, looking fly and fresh off a shoot for BET. The Loft is a mid-size club in the burgeoning Midtown strip. Reserved VIP booths line one wall, and Hot 104.1's best DJs broadcast live from the Loft, incinerating the dance floor with the best hip hop, R&B and soul. It may not be the biggest or swank-est club in River City, but the music is bangin' and the scene is too.
    Lure Nightclub
    This 7,000-square-foot nightclub is snow-white inside, with minimalist white leather benches for those with the scrill for bottle service. The chosen ones sit on an elevated level overlooking the club, and a VIP bar peeps out from behind gauzy white drapes. A trip to the bathroom will banish any illusions imparted by the swanky all-white decor, however: Like most places with a packed dance floor, the loo at Lure frequently runs out of paper towels -- and unless you're getting bottle service, your $10 Grey Goose cocktail comes in a plastic cup. Still, the DJ's are solid, the crowd is rowdy in the best way possible, and you won't leave Lure without witnessing at least one awesome dance-off.
    The Mad Magician
    From scene veterans and Archfront Media owners John Mancuso and Jason Rottler comes a new spot for rock, punk, metal and hip-hop to play. The Mad Magician gets its name from the mid '50s thriller film of the same name, paying homage to starring actor and St. Louisan Vincent Price. The venue's open floor plan features plenty of standing room and a huge stage manned with a blindingly colorful light show in rainbow hues. Mancuso hopes to bring in national artists (Bone-Thugs-N-Harmony, Method Man but are a few of the acts he's booked in the past) while giving locals the opportunity to open.
    mushmaus
    mushmaus, a self-proclaimed artist interchange, idea incubator and DIY arena, provides plenty of space for unconventional sights and sounds to lurk, crawl, leap and fall. The 7,500 square foot warehouse hosts everything from residencies and gritty artist installations to sweaty dance parties and shows -- these range from the harshest experimental sounds in town to pure and simple pop and rock. No matter the scene, mushmaus provides an ample, uninhibited environ for curious and creative souls to explore. Don't expect all the typical creature comforts of a music venue here -- mushmaus is dark, dingy and undeniably DIY.
    If you prefer action over ass, then the Oz is your east-side spot. It's three clubs in one: The main room has a dance floor, techno and house DJs, and four bars. An outdoor lounge called Patio Blue bumps hip-hop under a tented ceiling. The Emerald City VIP lounge has a decadent Casbah feel. Overall, there's a heady hook-up vibe in this all-night wonderland. Should you somehow not score, you can always stumble over to one of the strip bars next door.
    Quintessential Dining & Nightlife
    Located on historic Main Street in St. Charles, Quintessential Dining & Nightlife serves up an extensive menu for a variety of tastes. Options include a large selection of appetizers such as wings, hummus and deviled eggs, sandwiches, wraps and burgers. Quintessential also cooks up pizzas, which are available with thick crust or St. Louis style, and toppings range from the typical to a few surprises, such as chorizo and feta. Entrées include duck, salmon and multiple steak options alongside pasta choices that range from tutto mare to Cajun beef tortellini. Dessert features the obligatory crème brûlée as well as other options such as bananas Foster. Quintessential also includes large rooftop dining and lounge areas.
    Siam
    Owners Steven Preston and Ron Bray wanted to bring a different kind of entertainment experience to St. Louis. Siam is their experiment. The restaurant, bar and nightclub wants patrons to eschew labels (gay or straight, restaurant or club) and just come out for some good food and dancing. Chef Tyler Davis’ pan-Asian menu features fusion interpretations of classic comfort food. The Korean fried chicken, or “KFC,” drizzled with a sweet soy reduction, is an Eastern take on the chicken wing. Likewise, the “Umami Sliders” dress up the classic bar staple with housemade tofu, sweet tomato jam, fried shallots and wild mushrooms. Most notable is the kimchi hot pot, a steaming dish of pork-infused broth that teems with house-fermented vegetables, spinach, leeks and pork belly. Siam also serves a comprehensive sushi selection; the spicy crab and baked scallop salad on the “Goku roll” makes it a must-try. Do not pass on the desserts. Formerly a pastry chef, Davis’ creativity is on full display with offerings such as plum wine poached pears with mascarpone cheese. If the weather permits, dine on the patio, then head to the dance floor to work off what you ate.
    Syberg's on Dorsett
    The Maryland Heights location of Syberg's.
    T.J.'s Aliby Inn
    T.J.'s Aliby Inn is appropriately named, in that upon entering the one large open room that is the entirety of the establishment, one would be seen immediately by all in attendance -- handy just in case you need a good alibi. T.J.'s has been in business since 1964 and it's easy to see why: The bartenders are friendly, the drinks are cheap and the large open space makes for plenty of elbow room in a dive bar industry that can typically cause some claustrophobia at times. There's jello shots, a Touchtunes internet jukebox, two pool tables, four TVs -- everything you would expect from a well-accommodating hole in the wall (albeit a spacious hole).
    Voce
    Since it opened in December 2012, Voce, "a venue for all voices," as owner Steve Scaglione puts it, has hosted everything from jazz, blues and folk to the occasional punk show. The black and red room features a small unintimidating stage, tables for sitting, a full bar and plenty of standing room to get up close to the performance. The downtown spot connects directly to Maurizio's Pizza & Sports Bar, which spits out hand-tossed New York style pizzas every night of the week late into the evening. Get an Italian tinged experience by pairing some pizza with a performance.

Best Things to Do In St. Louis

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