Locations in St. Louis

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    Anthonino's Taverna
    The menu reflects both the Italian and the Greek heritage of owners Anthony and Rosario Scarato. The selection tilts toward the former, with numerous pizzas and pastas available, while the Greek board focuses on the cuisine's standbys, such as saganaki (flaming cheese), dolmathes (stuffed grape leaves) and gyros. The pizza is very good: the crust thick, with a slight chew and a teasing sweetness; the sauce lightly applied beneath a blanket of melting mozzarella; the toppings ideally proportioned. The gyro is also good and a great value. A welcoming spot with a wonderfully friendly staff.
    Bar 101 Soulard
    Some bars are content to offer clean glasses and booze, without gimmicks or an ounce of entertainment. Not so Bar 101; this Soulard joint "gets it all in," to borrow a term from the hip hop playbook. Outside, there's a giant sand volleyball court and about a million square feet of patio space with a large outdoor bar and fire pit. Inside, flat screens blare with in-house adverts and food porn that's bound to make your beer-filled tummy rumble, along with myriad games including basketball and a feat-of-strength boxing game. It's either a mini-Dave and Busters or an adult-friendly Chuck E. Cheese -- only instead of fake gold coins, your prize will be booze. Or maybe a stunning victory on the volleyball court. The menu features traditional bar food (cheese sticks, nachos) alongside unexpected choices (spinach-artichoke Rangoon, battered gator).
    Cusumano's Pizza
    At Cusamano's, scarf St. Louis-style pizzas oozing over with melted provel like the "Nick's" specialty pizza with hamburger, black olive and mushroom and wash it down -- if you dare -- with a kamikaze or purple hooter shot for just a buck a pop. The purple hooter comes out of an upcycled bottle in a frighteningly artificial grape-ish hue and tastes like melted popsicle. Slam a few or just get a personal-size pitcher of your favorite low budget beer. It's the perfect thing to slosh around while bumping shoulders with punks and metalheads in the pit during the occasional anything goes show upstairs. Cusumano's dark, two-story frat basement, replete with pool tables, bar-top trivia machines and a fun jukebox, also attracts a lot of industry types who swing by after their shifts; if you've ever fantasized about hooking up with a bartender, you'll find plenty to sidle up to here.
    The Heavy Anchor
    Known for its penchant to host a rowdy concert or two, The Heavy Anchor is part music venue, part watering hole. A thick wall divides the two halves, so the uninterested can drink in peace or join the fray of wild heathens on the music side. The bartenders serve cocktails in Mason jars, Heavy Anchor pins to festive-up that tatty punk jacket, and, just in case your Franzia problem is so out of control that you need a fix even in full view of strangers, boxed wine. The venue itself features a mid-level stage and a full-size sound booth, but it's the kind of place where bands feel comfortable enough to skip the stage and perform on the floor should they so desire. Nautical decor stretches from wall to wall with oceanic artifacts and vibrant paintings including a glaring narwhal and a friendly blue octopus toppling a cityscape with its tentacles. Located near Bevo Mill, The Heavy Anchor is a prime spot for shuffleboard playing with a regulation board and plenty of seating. Additionally weekly festivities include the likes of movie nights and trivia. You'll find local brews on tap, as well as such hometown munchies as Dogtown pizza, Billy Goat chips and Gus' pretzels.
    Hooters
    Home of the double entendre, the Hooters chain has become an American icon over the course of its short life. Founded in Florida during the glorious 1980s, the company with a hooting owl for a logo boasts its own magazine, a hotel on the Las Vegas Strip, and famous alumni like Hugh Hefner's former girlfriend Holly Madison. The Hooters girls at each of the 450 locations are the heart and soul (or is it the "T and A"?) of the company; from the American Midwest to the Czech Republic to Tokyo, every girl sports the same bright orange short-shorts, flesh-colored pantyhose and white sneakers. Perhaps it could be the food that keeps loyal St. Louis customers coming back. The menu focuses on chicken wings, with sauces ranging from mild to atomic, but there are also seasoned curly fries, shrimp, oysters, crab legs, burgers, and sandwiches, along with plenty of televisions tuned to whatever's going on in the sports world. Check out your local Hooters on Voice Places.
    Hooters
    Home of the double entendre, the Hooters chain has become an American icon over the course of its short life. Founded in Florida during the glorious 1980s, the company with a hooting owl for a logo boasts its own magazine, a hotel on the Las Vegas Strip, and famous alumni like Hugh Hefner's former girlfriend Holly Madison. The Hooters girls at each of the 450 locations are the heart and soul (or is it the "T and A"?) of the company; from the American Midwest to the Czech Republic to Tokyo, every girl sports the same bright orange short-shorts, flesh-colored pantyhose and white sneakers. Perhaps it could be the food that keeps loyal St. Louis customers coming back. The menu focuses on chicken wings, with sauces ranging from mild to atomic, but there are also seasoned curly fries, shrimp, oysters, crab legs, burgers, and sandwiches, along with plenty of televisions tuned to whatever's going on in the sports world. Check out your local Hooters on Voice Places.
    Hooters
    Home of the double entendre, the Hooters chain has become an American icon over the course of its short life. Founded in Florida during the glorious 1980s, the company with a hooting owl for a logo boasts its own magazine, a hotel on the Las Vegas Strip, and famous alumni like Hugh Hefner's former girlfriend Holly Madison. The Hooters girls at each of the 450 locations are the heart and soul (or is it the "T and A"?) of the company; from the American Midwest to the Czech Republic to Tokyo, every girl sports the same bright orange short-shorts, flesh-colored pantyhose and white sneakers. Perhaps it could be the food that keeps loyal St. Louis customers coming back. The menu focuses on chicken wings, with sauces ranging from mild to atomic, but there are also seasoned curly fries, shrimp, oysters, crab legs, burgers, and sandwiches, along with plenty of televisions tuned to whatever's going on in the sports world. Check out your local Hooters on Voice Places.
    Joey B's On The Hill
    Joey B's on the Hill might be more sedate than the original Joey B's on the Landing, but its neighborhood bar-and-grill ambiance is winning. The lengthy menu features standard bar-food fare like wings, T-ravs and potato skins, as well as pasta, burgers and sandwiches. The St. Louis-style pizza is popular, and those seeking a more substantial meal will find steak on the menu. The bite-size soft pretzels are fantastic: buttery sweet and served with a spicy jalapeño-cheese sauce for dipping. The dining rooms offer numerous flat-screen TVs to keep tabs on all the games.
    Latitude 26°
    The name is a reference to where Texas and Mexico literally meet, but St. Louisans will appreciate a local geographical reference: The restaurant occupies the address vacated by Chuy Arzola's (which itself reopened in the Coronado building). The renovation is thorough and has turned a cramped, dingy space into an airy one, thanks in large part to the floor-to-ceiling windows that front the restaurant. Owners Tony and Kelli Almond, who also operate Almond's in Clayton, have put together a concise menu that hews to standard Tex-Mex dishes: tacos, enchiladas, burritos and more. The beef brisket is tender and flavorful - a welcome alternative to the usual Tex-Mex meats.
    Malone's Grill & Pub-Ferguson
    Malone’s Neighborhood Pub and Grill offers a large menu, happy-hour specials and a friendly atmosphere. Malone’s menu features a variety of appetizers, sandwiches, burgers and entrées, and a bottomless lunch with salad and an eat-till-your-full amount of soup and chips and salsa. Sandwiches, which come with your choice of sides such as fries, mashed potatoes or coleslaw, include a Reuben, Jack Daniel’s-seasoned chicken and a rib-eye steak. Malone’s also serves up fried chicken, char-grilled ribs and fire-grilled steaks. Happy-hour drink specials run all day long and change daily.
    Pirate's Cove
    Pirate's Cove is a sports bar with a nautical outlook -- skull & crossbones and pirate ship adornments cover the walls alongside glowing neon beer signs and flat screen TVs. The spacious bar includes a portion of hardwood floor set up for washers -- a fun inclusion to the usual darts / golden tee / pool tables set-up (all of which can also be found here). Smokers will be glad to find ashtrays on the dozen or so tables and drinkers will be pleased with the full bar selection and courteous bartenders. Off to the side is a small stage for live music; Pirate's Cove is known to play host to bar and cover bands on weekends.
    The Post Sports Bar & Grill
    A fun and very laidback sports bar replete with tasty grub and cold beer. TV monitors and (mostly) St. Louis sports memorabilia cram the walls, while the requisite snacks - chicken wings, pizza, burgers - fill your tummy. The wings are good: spicy, meaty and crisp-skinned. You can also order the "Blazin' Chicken Dip," which folds together chicken, Buffalo sauce and cheese. Burgers are simply adorned and tasty, while pizzas are amply loaded with cheese and toppings. Stop in for happy hour Monday through Friday for 4 to 7 p.m. and start planning your fantasy sports team strategies.
    Riley's Pub
    Located on Arsenal Street, one block east of Grand Boulevard, Riley's Pub features St. Louis-style pizza served piping hot in a corner-bar atmosphere in south city. There are no DJs, dress code or gimmicks, just drinks and a jukebox. The interior is old-school: In its dim, high-backed booths, you'll feel equally comfortable sharing a pitcher of Guinness with an intimate group of friends or penning your first novel while knocking back shots of Jameson. Daily food and drink specials are written on a big chalkboard above the large, dark wooden bar, and Riley's has live Irish music weekly and $5 St. Louis-style pizzas on Monday and Tuesdays. Riley's is closed on Sundays but does keep serving the pies until late in the evening on other nights. It offers carry-out as well.
    Schoemehl's South Side Grill
    Schoemehl's South Side Grill is a friendly neighborhood bar-and-grill in the Patch neighborhood of south city. The menu is small (burgers and sandwiches with salads, a few appetizers and a daily special or two), the food tasty and satisfying. Burgers are a sure bet, juicy and cooked to your requested temperature. The wings, smoked first and then deep-fried and tossed in a richer, more complex version of Buffalo sauce, are even more impressive. Make sure to order the excellent (and addictive) house-made potato chips as a side.
    The Shack Pubgrub
    The Shack Pubgrub is first and foremost a college hangout. It offers cheap eats, cold beer and ridiculous specials ($1 burgers on Monday!). But that student-magnet veneer cloaks a serious pedigree: The owners and chef Justin Haifley are the folks behind the acclaimed Tavern Kitchen & Bar in Valley Park. The food is simple but fun and tasty, from the perfect “Boardwalk” fries to the tasty “Smash Burger.” There are tacos both conventional (fried fish, steak) and not (chicken with...Cool Ranch Doritos). The signature sandwich, the “Shack-Which,” is a massive, hangover-curing slab of meat, cheese, french fries (in the sandwich!), cole slaw and tomato.
    Syberg's on Dorsett
    The Maryland Heights location of Syberg's.
    T.J.'s Aliby Inn
    T.J.'s Aliby Inn is appropriately named, in that upon entering the one large open room that is the entirety of the establishment, one would be seen immediately by all in attendance -- handy just in case you need a good alibi. T.J.'s has been in business since 1964 and it's easy to see why: The bartenders are friendly, the drinks are cheap and the large open space makes for plenty of elbow room in a dive bar industry that can typically cause some claustrophobia at times. There's jello shots, a Touchtunes internet jukebox, two pool tables, four TVs -- everything you would expect from a well-accommodating hole in the wall (albeit a spacious hole).
    Voce
    Since it opened in December 2012, Voce, "a venue for all voices," as owner Steve Scaglione puts it, has hosted everything from jazz, blues and folk to the occasional punk show. The black and red room features a small unintimidating stage, tables for sitting, a full bar and plenty of standing room to get up close to the performance. The downtown spot connects directly to Maurizio's Pizza & Sports Bar, which spits out hand-tossed New York style pizzas every night of the week late into the evening. Get an Italian tinged experience by pairing some pizza with a performance.

Best Things to Do In St. Louis

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