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Opened as a means to provide food service to ravenous soccer fans at the adjacent Amsterdam Tavern, the Dam is the quintessential burger-and-hot-dog shack. Unlike traditional bar food, however, the Dam lives by its motto “slow food, fast,” using antibiotic and hormone-free local meats and seasonal, organic produce grown by local farmers. The result isn’t exactly health food – menu items include a selection of hot dogs covered in everything from cheese to jalapenos (one is even deep fried and wrapped in bacon), and Belgian-style fries dripping with mayonnaise. The Dam’s signatures are the fresh, hand-packed burgers; its namesake offering is a take on the patty melt served on buttery grilled sourdough with American and Swiss cheese. If one is feeling especially brave, if not slightly masochistic, the Dam’s "Animal" burger lives up to its infamous reputation. It’s three patties, smothered in sweet and spicy barbecue sauce, American cheese, grilled onions and a whole hog’s worth of bacon. The "Animal"’s piece de resistance is the grilled whole jalapeno that sits atop the patties and infuses the entire sandwich with its fiery flavor. Wear your stretchy pants.
According to Kohn's, there is no such thing as kosher-style. In other words, "kosher" doesn't simply mean a type of cuisine, it is instead a set of laws on what foods can be eaten and how that food can be prepared. At Kohn's Kosher Meat and Deli Restaurant on Old Olive Street Road, just west of Lindbergh Boulevard, both the selections at the meat counter and all the food on the menu are kosher. Inside the market and restaurant, patrons can order their matzo ball soup, bison burger, plate of lox, falafel, knishes or kugel, take a seat and know that their meal passes kosher supervision. Kohn's also offers boxed lunches featuring sandwiches or wraps with a salad and dessert item or a dairy lunch, which essentially means "meat-free." Kohn's also houses a full kosher meat counter with beef and poultry sold by the pound and a small market featuring various kosher items such as wines, sweets and cheeses.
Like the first fragile buds on Forest Park's trees or Mike Shannon's first home-run call from spring training, the first crowd on Kopperman's patio is a sure sign of spring. Not that people-watching in the Central West End is all that Kopperman's has going for it. The St. Louis institution dishes up simple, hearty breakfast fare, from bacon and eggs to French toast to bagels and lox. The sandwich menu isn't chopped liver, either - though you can, in fact, order chopped liver, as well as one of the city's standout roast beef sandwiches ("Love at First Bite"), beef tongue and the "Ike and Tina Tuna."
If it's your first time at Protzel's in Clayton, you pretty much have to order the corned beef, made in-house and piled high on rye bread and covered with mustard -- served, of course, with a pickle. Since 1954 this family-owned establishment has been churning out a wide array of fresh deli meats and cheeses. Other than the corned beef, you can also try the knishes, potato salad, deviled eggs or fresh Jewish rye bread chips. Or shop around for European goodies, taffy and sweets -- three entire shelves are devoted to mustard! The full selection of sandwiches at Protzel's includes roast beef, pastrami, peppered beef, salami and bologna. The deli also offers specialty sandwiches, such as the "John Carney Special," with a third of a pound of corned beef and pastrami, Munchee cheese, honey mustard and coleslaw served on an onion roll.
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