You searched for:

  • [X]Multi-Level
Start over

Search for…

Narrow Search

14 results
In the heart of Soulard, 1860 Saloon, Game Room and Hardshell Cafe serves up traditional, delicious fare, plus cajun and creole food. Customer favorites include our Famous Crab Cakes and Homemade Chicken Strips. The oysters, cajun pasta, pizzas and burgers are always a great choice. Enjoy a reasonably priced meal and drinks before taking the complimentary shuttle to Cardinals and Blues games. You can enjoy live Blues, Classic Rock, R&B, and Motown bands 365 days a year in the 1860 Saloon. Play foosball, pool and more in the Game Room. The third area, the Hardshell Café, also has a full bar, ample seating, and a several hundred gallon fish tank. There is lovely outside dining where fur babies are always welcome!
A central nighttime oases on Cherokee Street, this 20,000-square-foot behemoth features an ArtDimensions gallery on the second floor as just one element of its three stories full of neon lights and art. Hula hoopers, festive events and food trucks are no stranger to this popular weekend party pit. 2720 Cherokee brings in world-renowned DJs and dub steppers as well as a variety of reggaeton and miscellany to blast through a great big sound system, so expect to see ravers commingling with hipsters and hippies -- a truly utopian experience for the colorful club-hopper.
Dressel’s is a St. Louis institution, the Platonic ideal of a Welsh pub and one of the very best spots in town for a pint of good beer and cultured conversation. Which makes the trick that owner Ben Dressel and chef Michael Miller have pulled all the more impressive: Without robbing Dressel’s of any of its charms, they have elevated its food to among the best in town. The dishes are unfussy but elegant and deeply flavored. Recent standouts have included trout over a celery-root purée, chicken paired with a classic panzanella bread salad and deviled eggs flavored with ham hock and wasabi. Never fear: Dressel’s pub essentials (the burger, the chips and rarebit) are still available, and still as delicious as ever.
Element serves up hearty rustic American food in a beautifully restored historic brick building in Lafayette Square. The two-story, warmly rich space is filled with glass and wood and features an open kitchen in the lower level restaurant area so that every table feels like a chef’s table. Element is a casual fine dining restaurant that serves contemporary American cuisine in a luxurious space complete with an award-winning outdoor terrace. The menu changes often. There's a spectacular lounge located on the third floor, perfect for those who like cocktails with a view.
Brought to you by In Good Company, the local partnership behind Cafe Ventana, Sanctuaria and Diablitos Cantina, Hendricks BBQ enters the St. Charles market in a big — 17,000 square feet covering two levels — way. The sheer size of the place (slated to be a live-music venue and moonshine distillery, to boot) might be overwhelming, but chef Chris Lee and pitmaster Matt Vanderbeck make sure the focus is squarely on the food. Barbecue, smoked over apple and hickory wood, includes baby-back and St. Louis-cut spare ribs, beef brisket, pulled pork, turkey and sausage. If you like sauce, Hendricks’ “STL” is your best bet: complex, with just a little heat. Collard greens with bacon and grits with cheddar cheese are the can’t-miss sides. Consider trying the fried chicken, either by itself or smothered with gravy in an open-face sandwich.
Mangia Italiano is a classy 3 a.m. bar right in the middle of South Grand. There is plenty of free live music to be had, from Vinyl Fight DJ spins to the Dave Stone Trio’s incomparable jazz. The draft beer offers lots of local selections, with many more in bottles (Stag in cans for the neighborhood hipsters). The wine list has some good-value priced options with an emphasis on Italian varietals while serious cocktails with house infusions round out the drink list. Those looking to make a bad late-night decision can indulge in the pizza and other comfort foods. If you've been around the block a few times and remember Mangia from its humble beginnings as a smoky little bar, check out the newly expanded space and game room downstairs. There's also a lovely mural by neighborhood painter Wayne St. Wayne that appears to depict the history of the world, from Romulus and Remus to Monica Lewinsky - you’ll find something new each time you look at it. If the inside gets too packed, sit outside and enjoy a drink and some of South Grand’s best people watching.
The Marquee Restaurant & Lounge downtown comes from the same husband-and-wife duo that brings you the Loft nightclub. The restaurant features American fusion including everything from chicken wings to seafood pasta, with a bar specializing in vodka and tequila cocktails. Come for dinner and stay for an evening of drinks in comfortable, private booths.
mushmaus, a self-proclaimed artist interchange, idea incubator and DIY arena, provides plenty of space for unconventional sights and sounds to lurk, crawl, leap and fall. The 7,500 square foot warehouse hosts everything from residencies and gritty artist installations to sweaty dance parties and shows -- these range from the harshest experimental sounds in town to pure and simple pop and rock. No matter the scene, mushmaus provides an ample, uninhibited environ for curious and creative souls to explore. Don't expect all the typical creature comforts of a music venue here -- mushmaus is dark, dingy and undeniably DIY.
Pan D'Olive takes over the swank Franz Park address that Mihalis Chophouse vacated a few years ago. The space still looks like a million bucks, but this Mediterranean restaurant (mostly Italian, with a few Greek, Turkish and southern French touches) carries a decidedly less upscale price tag. Only a few entrées cross the $20 mark, and more than dozen appetizers are priced $10 or less. Dishes include shareable plates like hummus, fried calamari and arancini. Entrées feature crowd-pleasers: pastas, a massive lamb shank, a charbroiled rib-eye steak. A humble dish of baked cannelloni conveys surprising soul thanks to its hearty Bolognese sauce and properly made béchamel.
When Quincy Street Bistro opened in 2011 in the city’s Princeton Heights neighborhood, it was a very good corner tavern. When Rick Lewis, who had worked under Josh Galliano at the acclaimed restaurant Monarch, took over the kitchen in late 2012, Quincy Street became a very good restaurant. Lewis has refined the menu and added a Southern accent. The BLT, for example, features tart, crisp fried green tomatoes as well as house-cured bacon. Suppers include fried chicken and catfish as well as pork roast and cast-iron seared steaks. The burgers — ten-ounce patties ground from locally raised beef — are among the best in town.
The Schlafly Tap Room, opened in 1991, was the first brewery to open in Missouri since Prohibition, paving the way for more breweries in St. Louis. There are generally around 16-18 hand-crafted beers available on tap in the historic brick and timber building. The appetizer list includes pub favorites such as French fries, pretzels and beer bread, with a surprise or two like frog legs and pickled herring. There are five variations on the traditional English “Moules - Frites” plate. Hearty sandwiches and entrees round out the full menu. Live music can be heard Thursday through Sunday and the restaurant regularly hosts events, such as the Belgian Beer and Mussel Festival, Oyster Fest and various beer tastings.
Schoemehl's South Side Grill is a friendly neighborhood bar-and-grill in the Patch neighborhood of south city. The menu is small (burgers and sandwiches with salads, a few appetizers and a daily special or two), the food tasty and satisfying. Burgers are a sure bet, juicy and cooked to your requested temperature. The wings, smoked first and then deep-fried and tossed in a richer, more complex version of Buffalo sauce, are even more impressive. Make sure to order the excellent (and addictive) house-made potato chips as a side.
Restaurateur David Bailey takes the whiskey-bar trend in an unexpected direction with his vegetarian eatery, Small Batch. Bailey doesn’t bill the place as a crunchy vegetarian spot; instead, he hopes that diners will enjoy the vegetable-focused concept so much that they fail to miss the meat. The carbonara pasta, made with housemade linguine, replaces the richness of bacon with smoked mushrooms. Even the most die-hard carnivore will be satisfied by the “burger,” a greasy-spoon-style corn and black bean patty stopped with creamy guacamole, Chihuahua cheese, and Bailey’s signature “Rooster” sauce (tangy mayonnaise). Small Batch’s bourbon selection and creative cocktails are also impressive. The “Smokeysweet,” a blend of smoked cherries, rye and rhubarb, tastes like drinking punch by a campfire. For a taste of summer in a glass, the “Rickey” is a bright concoction of elderflower liquor, grapefruit, lime and white corn whiskey. The gorgeous, vintage setting provides an ideal spot to indulge in some Prohibition-era-style drinking.
The owners of Tani Sushi Bistro in Clayton have opened one of the cornerstone restaurants of the new Mercantile Exchange development downtown. Like Tani, Takaya New Asian offers nigiri sushi, sashimi and over-the-top Americanized rolls. (The “Oh My God” roll comes to your table engulfed in flames.) Unlike Tani, though, Takaya fails as a restaurant in nearly every respect. Much of the menu features dubious takes on the already played-out Asian-fusion trend. There are sliders with bulgolgi beef, and fried cheese sticks classed up with a light tempura breading. The sushi is sloppily prepared, only one of several missteps from a careless kitchen that might mar your meal.
14 total results

Best Things to Do In St. Louis

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.


© 2018 Riverfront Times

Website powered by Foundation