You searched for:

  • [X]St. Louis - Downtown/ Midtown
  • [X]St. Louis - Downtown
  • [X]Menu
Start over

Search for…

Narrow Search

102 results
Ain't nothing like a good rooftop bar, and 360 is one of the swankest. Occupying the entire top floor of the Hilton at the Ballpark, 360 offers a view that rivals the Arch, without the cramped space of those washing machine-sized trams inside our unmistakable landmark. The owners of 360 spared no expense; the posh interior features a spectacular two-story waterfall, elegant bars both inside and out, and glassed-in VIP seating for the well-heeled. The extravagant menu features high-end and locally-sourced ingredients, and a perfectly curated drink list that will make your mouth water. From the roof deck, check out the nearby Gateway Arch and the Mississippi River churning just underneath, the cityscape to the west and a unique vantage point directly into Busch Stadium.
The downtown location of 6 North Café offers a full menu of lunch and breakfast items. Located at 701 Market Street in the Gateway One building, patrons can enter the ground floor café at the corner of Eighth and Chestnut streets. The locally owned 6 North features Kaldi's coffee and loose teas, as well as assorted pastries, bagels and breakfast sandwiches in the morning. Lunch options include hot and cold sandwiches, wraps, salads and daily soups. 6 North also sells fruit, coffee and tea, smoothies, and box lunches catering to downtown offices. Plenty of indoor seating is available offering an upscale coffeehouse ambiance, with additional outdoor tables and chairs along Chestnut Street for fair-weather dining.
Bohemian meets upper crust when the Bommarito family of five-diamond Tony's fame shakes things up at suppertime. Anthony's Bar extends its power-lunch reputation beyond the dinner hour with appetizers like a pulled pork tamale and entrées like herb-stuffed salmon and a grilled porkchop with roasted tomatoes and potatoes. The menu is brief and reasonably priced, the atmosphere casual -- if frozen in a ´70s time warp. As at Tony's, expect great attention to the food and service (the two restaurants share a kitchen).
Asia reflects only a sliver of the titular continent's size and cultural variety. Instead it focuses on those countries many might think of when they hear the phrase "Asian cuisine": China, Japan, Vietnam and Thailand. Sushi is prepared well, though the fish itself is merely good, not outstanding. Entrées lean toward Chinese and Chinese-American dishes like General Tso's chicken; house specialties include Peking duck and an excellent Cornish hen dish. The Cornish hen is one of the few values on a relatively high-priced menu.
In a town with as many blues enthusiasts as St. Louis, the question of which blues club is best can be a topic of spirited discussion. BB's Jazz, Blues and Soups inhabits a historic brick buildings that oozes atmosphere, and it offers a first-rate selection of local and touring performers. BB's features a varied schedule of musical acts, a large year-round seating capacity and full-service kitchen specializing in Cajun and Creole food, in addition to a selection of American bar food.
The Beale on Broadway home to live blues, soul and R&B seven nights a week 'til 3am.
Big City Subs & Grill is a sandwich shop located in downtown St. Louis.
Restaurateur Dave Bailey's The Bridge offers a terrific casual-dining experience in a stylish downtown space. The two-story upscale hideaway in downtown St. Louis celebrates artisanal beers and wines and craft cocktails. Artsy lighting and a sumptuous wooden bar create a classically beautiful atmosphere you won’t soon want to leave. The menu intensely focuses on creative small plates, snacks, charcuterie and cheese, sandwiches, salads and small entrees. The decor, especially the giant bird's-nest light fixtures, is, frankly, awesome.
A true taste of N'awlins awaits you at this party-time Cajun/Creole dive, housed in a 150-year-old historic building in the shadows of Busch Stadium and downtown. Order up a mess of crawfish, fried alligator, jambalaya or gumbo (the house recipe, known as Gumbo Ya Ya, is mixed with shrimp, chicken and andouille sausage), or go for one of the five grinders or five varieties of oysters on the half-shell. The Big Easy ain't just found in the flavors, though: Broadway Oyster Bar is also a great place to see national jazz, blues and zydeco acts seven days a week. Nowhere else in town can you eat gator meat and oysters and hear live music. The regulars know it, and they pack the bar so full it makes you wonder if N'awlins natives aren't coming up here for a slice o' blues, St. Louis-style. Laissez le bon temps rouler, indeed.
To musicians, a breve is a double whole note; to coffee drinkers, as Café Breve's convenient coffee charts explain, a breve is an espresso shot and half-and-half topped with foam. Located in the AT&T Center at 909 Chestnut Street, breakfast and lunch diners can find their way into Café Breve at the building's entrance at Tenth and Pine streets. The local chain specializes in coffee drinks for the early-morning crowd but also offers full breakfast and lunch menus. In addition to scones, muffins and assorted pastries, Breve's breakfast options include bagels, croissants and ciabattas filled with eggs, meat and cheese. Their lunch items allow patrons to design their own sandwich or choose from their many grilled paninis, wraps and salads. The coffee they offer is Café Breve's own brand, with an array of flavors and roasts available daily. They also serve fruit smoothies and ice cream, for those interested in a quick sweet treat.
A Snickers bar and a Coke would be an odd, out of place even, accompaniment to enjoying a relaxing seat in the lush, historic lobby of the Paul Brown building. Fortunately, connected to that lobby, chocolate aficionados can find a more apt taste of toothsome delights. Behind the glass cases in Cafe Cioccolato, in a rainbow of browns and reds and yellows and whites, sit rows of decadent little treasures brought over from the continent, each one labeled with its region of export. Try a French caramel or a Swiss truffle or taste a Belgian Neuhaus creation made from only pure cocoa butter. Cioccolato also offers a few bites made in-house, such as their chocolate-covered caramel coins. The chocolatier sells espressos and hot chocolate in addition to their saccharine morsels, and their 5 p.m.-to-7 p.m. happy hour features beer, wine and liquor, and other specially prepared food. Patrons can sit in one of the cafés large, comfy chairs and taste a bit of sweetness from the Cocoa Belt.
102 total results

Best Things to Do In St. Louis

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.


© 2018 Riverfront Times

Website powered by Foundation