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Bohemian meets upper crust when the Bommarito family of five-diamond Tony's fame shakes things up at suppertime. Anthony's Bar extends its power-lunch reputation beyond the dinner hour with appetizers like a pulled pork tamale and entrées like herb-stuffed salmon and a grilled porkchop with roasted tomatoes and potatoes. The menu is brief and reasonably priced, the atmosphere casual -- if frozen in a ´70s time warp. As at Tony's, expect great attention to the food and service (the two restaurants share a kitchen).
Asia reflects only a sliver of the titular continent's size and cultural variety. Instead it focuses on those countries many might think of when they hear the phrase "Asian cuisine": China, Japan, Vietnam and Thailand. Sushi is prepared well, though the fish itself is merely good, not outstanding. Entrées lean toward Chinese and Chinese-American dishes like General Tso's chicken; house specialties include Peking duck and an excellent Cornish hen dish. The Cornish hen is one of the few values on a relatively high-priced menu.
Restaurateur Dave Bailey's The Bridge offers a terrific casual-dining experience in a stylish downtown space. The two-story upscale hideaway in downtown St. Louis celebrates artisanal beers and wines and craft cocktails. Artsy lighting and a sumptuous wooden bar create a classically beautiful atmosphere you won’t soon want to leave. The menu intensely focuses on creative small plates, snacks, charcuterie and cheese, sandwiches, salads and small entrees. The decor, especially the giant bird's-nest light fixtures, is, frankly, awesome.
A true taste of N'awlins awaits you at this party-time Cajun/Creole dive, housed in a 150-year-old historic building in the shadows of Busch Stadium and downtown. Order up a mess of crawfish, fried alligator, jambalaya or gumbo (the house recipe, known as Gumbo Ya Ya, is mixed with shrimp, chicken and andouille sausage), or go for one of the five grinders or five varieties of oysters on the half-shell. The Big Easy ain't just found in the flavors, though: Broadway Oyster Bar is also a great place to see national jazz, blues and zydeco acts seven days a week. Nowhere else in town can you eat gator meat and oysters and hear live music. The regulars know it, and they pack the bar so full it makes you wonder if N'awlins natives aren't coming up here for a slice o' blues, St. Louis-style. Laissez le bon temps rouler, indeed.
Top-quality meat and a bona fide big-city atmosphere, but you certainly pay for the privilege. The restaurant takes up most of the ground floor of what used to be the four-story, stainless-steel-clad American Zinc Building. Be sure to take note of the miracle of engineering -- more than 50 feet of unbroken space, made possible with something called Vierendeel trusses -- that creates an open, modern atmosphere, tempered by a giant original mural across one wall. Great steaks -- even better if you're on an expense account.
The downtown outpost of Charlie Gitto's has been cooking since 1974. The menu includes the staples of Italian meals - spaghetti bolognese, fettuccine alfredo, osso bucco - and some St. Louis-specific selections, including T-ravs and the option of Provel on sandwiches. Fans of Gitto's red sauce and house dressing can purchase either at many local grocery stores or at the restaurant.
Death in the Afternoon is a culinary oasis set in downtown's idyllic Citygarden. The weekday lunch spot is the brainchild of Adam Frager and TJ Vytlacil of the members-only restaurant and bar Blood & Sand. Death in the Afternoon features impeccably presented soups, salads, sandwiches and snacks. From kimchi and pickled vegetables to house-made pastrami served on a pretzel, the menu offers something for everyone's palate. The mahi mahi sandwich is spectacular: The fresh grilled fish is so moist it's as if it were poached. Served with Meyer lemon and dill aioli, pickles and fennel salad, it's an excellent lunchtime treat. The restaurant's signature entree is the tonkotsu ramen, a bowl of mouthwatering pork broth teeming with housemade noodles, mushrooms, pork loin and belly, a soft-boiled egg and garnished with black garlic oil. It's comfort in a bowl. And lest the kids romping in Citygardens' fountains have all the fun, Death in the Afternoon serves a rotating selection of cotton candy for dessert. It's a whimsical end to a perfect meal - a great way to kill an afternoon.
"Eat Rite or Don't Eat At All." So it says on the coffee cups (and the souvenir T-shirts) at this no-frills 24-hour greasy spoon amid the industrial wasteland between downtown and Soulard. Folks come from miles around to fill up on the breakfast-and-burgers menu: bar-hoppers and club kids finally coming down from their late-night-into-early-morning highs; factory workers and blue-collars getting off graveyard shifts; curious newcomers who've heard about the bizarro vibe that pervades these cramped counter-only environs. To call the food at Eat-Rite cheap is an understatement -- six burgers (real-size, not White Castle-size) run $4.50. And many swear by the Eat-Rite's redoubtable slinger (for the uninitiated, that'd be fried eggs, hash browns and a burger patty, avec chili).
Harry's offers world-class picture-postcard views out the windows and some equally world-class scenes on the plate. The kitchen tosses in luxury ingredients such as saffron, foie gras and sevruga caviar for a top-of-the-line menu. Its cozy bar, cathedral-ceilinged dining room and back-room atrium (which features local jazz and rock bands) makes it a popular hangout for young professionals and couples out on the town. And though Harry's is open year-round, its summertime patio takes the cake. Larger than the indoor space, with a giant stage to host musical acts and an incredible view of Union Station, there is no better place to sip a Salty Dog.
Former Cardinals center fielder Jim Edmonds and business partner Mark Winfield hit a home run with Jim Edmonds 15 Steakhouse, an upscale steak house and lounge. The brief menu features excellent steaks, of course - the dry-aged strip is worth the extra scratch - but the kitchen lavishes attention on every element of the menu, including non-steak entrées and desserts. The people-watching in the surprisingly small dining room is excellent (and even better in the lounge areas). Upstairs from the restaurant, Club 15 is a dimly lit room where pretty young things and the guys who lust after them toss back vodka Red Bulls in plastic cups and get busy on the dance floor. Exposed brick and red lights will make you feel like you're partying in someone's loft, though the ambiance is minimal at best. DJs spin a variety of hip-hop and Top 40, and the young crowd seems ready to party all night.
Dives usually aren't this spacious; there are enough tables and chairs set up in Maurizio's to make it look like a cross between a sports bar and a corporate cafeteria. Dives also never boast menus this expansive: New York-style pizzas, strombolis, lasagna, manicotti, rib-eye steak, lemon chicken, pork steak, subs, burgers, salads and -- the icing on the cake -- tiramisu. And while the tons of food at cheap prices is great and all, what makes Maurizio's a don't-miss is the late-night people-watching. Open till 3 a.m. seven days a week, Maurizio's is the place to cap off a night of downtown debauchery -- and to witness all walks of Lou life in their after-hours glory.
A long fly ball from the new Busch Stadium, the new Mike Shannon's Steak and Seafood is, like its namesake, larger than life and in love with baseball. Search among the memorabilia for your favorite hall of famer's jersey while you enjoy a prime (and expensive) steak -- or while you have a beer or two at the bar after the game. The menu is classic steak house, the steaks unadorned but bloody good. For those who prefer more nuanced flavors, consider the daily seafood special or the lamb chops. They aren't the reason you come to a place like Shannon's -- but they, and the buzz of dozens of excited Cardinals fans, are the reason you'll come back.
Mizu fits nicely into the Washington Avenue loft district's trendy aesthetic: spacious and sleek without seeming hipper than thou. The extensive menu includes nigiri sushi, sashimi and rolls both traditional and Americanized. The nigiri sushi ranges from good to very good. Best is toro, fatty tuna belly that's worth the expense. There are numerous appetizers (including a sushified version of the jalapeño popper), and non-sushi entrées like chicken or steak teriyaki. The menu also features a couple of Korean dishes; particularly tasty is a generous portion of savory-sweet barbecue beef ribs.
Seinfeld fans need no introduction to the first St. Louis branch of this national chain. Founder Al Yeganeh was the inspiration for the sitcom's infamous Soup Nazi -- an association that Yeganeh has disavowed. Still, the décor will remind you of the sensation that episode caused: There are poster-size newspaper articles praising Yeganehs soup; a TV set plays nonstop footage of Yeganeh on the news. That's a lot of hype, and the best soups (almost) justify it. Crab bisque brims with buttery sweet meat. Mulligatawny is complex and peppery, and yankee bean soup with bacon has a wonderfully smoky depth. Combos (soup paired with a salad or half of a sandwich) are a good deal.
Pickles lies in an unassuming storefront in the Central West End close to a multitude of dining options. Diners can build their own sandwich from the different meat, cheese and bread options, including roast beef, ham and Volpi salami. Sides include traditional deli standards such as cole slaw and potato salad.
22 total results

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