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A Columbia institution since the Chester A. Arthur administration, Booches is a legend among residents and expatriates - not to mention burger aficionados everywhere - for its tasty burgers and cheeseburgers. The burgers aren't that big, by today's standards, so you might want to take your server's advice and order two (at least). No secret here, just simple, beefy brilliance. So good you won't even mind that you can't order fries or onion rings. Be sure to check out the old-school pool and snooker tables and the rows of cues padlocked to the wall. Note: In true, old-school fashion, Booches is cash only.
St. Louis diners who have never managed to master Starbucks' sizing system will find Cold Stone Creamery's similarly challenging; the ice-cream chain eschews small, medium, and large in favor of "Like It," "Love It," and "Gotta Have It" sizes. Once the portion is picked, patrons can concoct their own creations from super-premium ice cream flavors like vanilla, cake batter, chocolate, strawberry and coffee, plus a kaleidoscope of toppings: nuts, brownies, cookies, candy, and even chunks of pie crust. The Creamery's ice cream engineers will scoop your selections onto a frozen slab and deftly fold in the toppings, ensuring that you won't have to hunt very far with your spoon for another hunk of cookie dough. Voice Places has Cold Stone Creamery down cold.
One of four St. Louis-area locations of the nationwide chain, this location, like the others locally, now offers a small-plates menu, which includes kabobs, hummus and different takes on fries (truckstop fries, for example, are covered in chipotle cheese sauce). Beyond the small plates, which, if successful, will be introduced at all Houlihan's across the country, the menu covers much ground, with entrees ranging from enchiladas to build-your-own burgers to almond-crusted tilapia.
Saying Noodles & Company serves noodles is kind of like saying Albert Pujols hits home runs. The Denver-based fast-casual chain treats the humble noodle like the king of all food (which for much of the world it is). You get ample portions of perfectly cooked noodles mixed with sautéed-to-order fresh vegetables, flavorful sauces and meat or tofu. Best of all, you can customize your meal to your heart's content, creating the expected (an "Indonesian Peanut Sauté" with chicken, say) or the, um, unique ("Wisconsin Mac & Cheese" with shrimp?). Whatever you choose, for not very much money -- and in very little time -- you'll enjoy a tasty and pretty dang healthy meal. See listings for additional locations above and under "South."
Located smack-dab in the heart of Saint Louis University, Pickleman’s (the first local branch of a small chain based in Columbia) is so thronged with SLU students it should probably be included on the campus map. The concept is simple: toasted sandwiches, including the standard array of cold cuts. Several sandwiches are made with chicken breast meat (buffalo chicken, chipotle chicken). The Italian beef, served au jus and topped with hot peppers, is the standout. Pizzas, routed through the same toaster as the sandwiches, are also available.
Located smack-dab in the heart of Saint Louis University, Pickleman's (the first local branch of a small chain based in Columbia) is so thronged with SLU students it should probably be included on the campus map. The concept is simple: toasted sandwiches, including the standard array of cold cuts. Several sandwiches are made with chicken breast meat (buffalo chicken, chipotle chicken). The Italian beef, served au jus and topped with hot peppers, is the standout. Pizzas, routed through the same toaster as the sandwiches, are also available.
Things we'd go to Columbia to do: Watch the Tigers get their asses handed to them on the gridiron and/or hardcourt. Browse all the cute college-town bookstores. Eat at Shakespeare's Pizza -- which might be the best pizza in St. Louis when you get right down to it, notwithstanding the 100-mile drive. Pounded out in a perpetual frenzy by a bunch of groovy-hippy college kids and post-collegiates, Shake's dough is made in both white and wheat varieties. (Yeah, wheat crusts usually suck, but these rock.) The cheese is provolone, not mozz. (It's tough to tell the difference.) And the toppings come in a nearly endless, always fresh assortment: pineapple, hand-sliced pepperoni, peppers, lean ground beef, jalapeños, broccoli.... Located right across the street from Mizzou's campus, Shakespeare's weathered-wood interior reeks of study breaks, first dates and drinking games; in short, it's a fantastic vibe. No wonder regulars traditionally send in snapshots of themselves wearing their Shakespeare's T-shirts in faraway places -- even farther away than St. Louis.
Things we'd go to Columbia to do: Watch the Tigers get their asses handed to them on the gridiron and/or hardcourt. Browse all the cute college-town bookstores. Eat at Shakespeare's Pizza -- which might be the best pizza in St. Louis when you get right down to it, notwithstanding the 100-mile drive. Pounded out in a perpetual frenzy by a bunch of groovy-hippy college kids and post-collegiates, Shake's dough is made in both white and wheat varieties. (Yeah, wheat crusts usually suck, but these rock.) The cheese is provolone, not mozz. (It's tough to tell the difference.) And the toppings come in a nearly endless, always fresh assortment: pineapple, hand-sliced pepperoni, peppers, lean ground beef, jalapeños, broccoli.... Located right across the street from Mizzou's campus, Shakespeare's weathered-wood interior reeks of study breaks, first dates and drinking games; in short, it's a fantastic vibe. No wonder regulars traditionally send in snapshots of themselves wearing their Shakespeare's T-shirts in faraway places -- even farther away than St. Louis.
An airy, modern space in the heart of downtown Columbia. Chef Mike Odette has an affinity for local, seasonal ingredients, such as pork from nearby Patchwork Family Farms. Dishes tend toward classic bistro fare - cassoulet, mussels, steak - with an attention to detail (like the three crisp fried sage leaves atop homemade gnocchi with butternut squash) that makes them memorable. The weekday lunch menu is an especially good value.
It's like drinking in the rec room of the coolest family you know: lots of canned beer and homey food (fried chicken and corn-dog bites, anyone?). The place even has a small game room with old-school Sega and Nintendo tucked away down a half flight of stairs. There's a traditional full bar, but the real fun is in choosing a can of anything from Schlitz to Boddingtons. Just stay away from the Camo malt liquor -- trust us.
16 total results

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