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A promised land of milk and honey and falafel, Al-Tarboush is the perfect pilgrimage for hungry folk without much cash. Half grocery, half counter-service diner, it has only a few tables, and some of the menu items (e.g. the tabbouleh) come right out of the refrigerated case. Other Middle Eastern goodies include stuffed grape leaves; meat, spinach and cheese pies; and hummus.
Voice Places is your guide to Ben & Jerry's in St. Louis. The brainchild of two self-proclaimed Vermont hippies back in the 1970s, Ben & Jerry's has grown into a worldwide ice cream empire. Despite being bought out by megacorporation Unilever in 2000, the brand has remained true to its crunchy roots by supporting various causes such as campaign spending reform and even the Occupy movement. Its scoop shops serve up all the B&J's classics, from wacky flavors named for jam bands (Phish Food and Cherry Garcia) to newer creations like the Stephen Colbert-endorsed Americone Dream, plus sundaes, shakes, smoothies and coffee drinks.
A neighborhood restaurant with a menu overseen by (very) prominent - and (very) busy - local chef Mike Johnson. Dishes draw inspiration from Mediterranean cuisines, not only European, but also North African and Middle Eastern. Crab cakes are spiced with za'atar and served with a harissa aioli; falafel is served in bite-size "popcorn" form. The menu is dominated by small plates, but there are also sandwiches, soups and flatbread pizzas, as well as a few pasta dishes and traditional entrées. Weather permitting, the patio is a popular seat.
At the corner of Westgate and Delmar sits Blue Ocean Sushi, which joined the city's roster of sushi restaurants in 2008. Blue Ocean offers the standards (cucumber rolls, California rolls) as well as more adventurous options such as the AK-47 roll, which contains spicy tuna, cucumber, cream cheese, eel, sweet potato and sriracha sauce. There is also a small list of entrees, including chicken and beef teriyaki, as well as nigiri.
A true St. Louis landmark, Blueberry Hill has been a hotspot in the Delmar Loop for over 40 years. With pop culture memorabilia lining every nook and cranny, jukeboxes, dart leagues and toys on display, there's fun to be had by people of all ages. The menu features classic American fare like burgers, sandwiches, house-made soups and salads with vegetarian specialties as well. A late night menu is offered after 9 p.m., which includes some daytime favorites in addition to breakfast food. The extensive bar stocks 63 bottled beers and 18 draught taps, both local and imported. With multiple stages spanned across an impressive square footage, Blueberry Hill has plenty of room for touring and local bands alike. The restaurant is open every day of the year for lunch and into the wee hours of the morning, from 11-1:30 a.m.
The coffee itself is pretty personal: It's pour-over, right in front of you. The coffee comes served on a metal tray with a coffee cup and beaker, which makes the whole thing feel crafted and scientific. There's also espresso and tea, as well as iced and decaf coffee. Blueprint isn't stingy with the food, either. The slices of bread -- English muffin, New York rye, French peasant, six-grain wheat, raisin cinnamon walnut -- are generous, as are the cheeses from Heartland Creamery. Cream scones, sour cream muffins and croissants were also on hand from Comet Microbakery. Blueprint also has housemade lemon raspberry, plum and peach preserves and compote.
A clean, well-lit place that serves straightforward Chinese dishes, the Noodle Café has made itself a welcome addition to the Loop's never-ending ethnic options. Inexpensive entrées include the usual suspects -- sweet-and-sour chicken, cashew chicken, pepper steak, fried tofu with vegetables, General Tso's chicken -- but the five noodle dishes are the real reason to stop in, especially during the winter months. Generous amounts of fresh cilantro, celery and carrots add grace notes to the broth and noodles; takeout servings are large enough to last for two or even three meals. Owner Peggy Hou has been in the St. Louis restaurant business for more than 25 years, and in this little storefront spot she's got another winner.
Cicero’s in the Loop is a beer lover’s haven. With 55 choices on tap and almost 200 bottles from around the world, Cicero’s considers itself the booze capital of St. Louis. With selections that alternate weekly, you can try just about any beer you’ve ever heard of along with a handful you haven’t. For the budding booze enthusiast, Cicero’s also has an extensive beer school: free weekly classes span over four months either in fall or late winter/early spring, allowing students to try out three or four different selections each week while learning from experts in the industry. And don’t worry, Cicero’s also has a full bar of liquor. The food menu features famous salads and pizzas in addition to pastas, sandwiches and burgers. Cicero’s also has a live music space with frequent performances - all set apart from the rest of restaurant.
St. Louis diners who have never managed to master Starbucks' sizing system will find Cold Stone Creamery's similarly challenging; the ice-cream chain eschews small, medium, and large in favor of "Like It," "Love It," and "Gotta Have It" sizes. Once the portion is picked, patrons can concoct their own creations from super-premium ice cream flavors like vanilla, cake batter, chocolate, strawberry and coffee, plus a kaleidoscope of toppings: nuts, brownies, cookies, candy, and even chunks of pie crust. The Creamery's ice cream engineers will scoop your selections onto a frozen slab and deftly fold in the toppings, ensuring that you won't have to hunt very far with your spoon for another hunk of cookie dough. Voice Places has Cold Stone Creamery down cold.
Family-friendly Fitz's offers Delmar Loop visitors a large menu beyond the beverages that Fitz's is known for. The burger menu alone offers more than a dozen options, including a bison burger, a Kobe burger and a chili Frito burger. Wash it all down with a Fitz's root beer or any of the variety of Fitz's beverages. Diners who save room can enjoy a root beer float or perhaps a Creamboat float (made with Fitz's cream soda). There is usually a wait on weekend nights.
Pinkberry, the frozen-yogurt craze that swept New York and Los Angeles a few years ago, has yet to reach St. Louis, but Fro-Yo is a reasonable substitute. You are charged by the ounce for however much frozen yogurt and toppings you can fit into a cup. Yogurt flavors range from plain to fruit and chocolate varieties. Toppings include fresh fruit, nuts and crumbled candy. Be careful: Those all-you-can-eat ounces add up at the cash register.
CLOSED The walls could use a fresh coat of paint, but maybe that's part of the charm of this quintessential college-nabe cheap-eats Middle Eastern joint. You got your hummus, your Greek salads, your falafel...and, yes, your gyros -- which rock. They're available in standard form or with jumbo helpings of meat and feta or in a house-special version topped with hummus instead of tzatziki. Baklava is what's for dessert. Everything costs less than ten bucks (most of it's under $7), and the portions are big enough to stash in your dorm room's mini-fridge to see you through those wee-hour cravings.
34 total results

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