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Cheery, pretense-free and thoroughly devoted to the community, Cairdeas is the embodiment of everything that's good about Dogtown. Local artists' works adorn the walls; regulars sit and sip on the pretty garden patio. The coffee is aces, as are the smoothies and the icy, fruity granitas (perfect for a summer afternoon). And here's a bit of advice: Go to Cairdeas hungry. That way you can try the house-made baked goods, a delish gourmet sandwich or a hearty breakfast item (like a honey-wheat tortilla stuffed with bacon, egg, pepper cheese and salsa). So grab a drink, a nosh and a seat -- you'll want to stay awhile.
This homey south-city spot packs 'em in on weekend mornings, and with good reason: The breakfast items are out of this world. Fluffy three-egg omelets come stuffed with the usual suspects (ham, Cheddar cheese) and more exceptional ingredients (salsiccia, artichokes); heavenly pancakes (buttermilk or buckwheat) fairly flop over the sides of the plate. Come lunchtime Chris' offers a nice selection of sandwiches. This is good food served by good folks.
St. Louis diners who have never managed to master Starbucks' sizing system will find Cold Stone Creamery's similarly challenging; the ice-cream chain eschews small, medium, and large in favor of "Like It," "Love It," and "Gotta Have It" sizes. Once the portion is picked, patrons can concoct their own creations from super-premium ice cream flavors like vanilla, cake batter, chocolate, strawberry and coffee, plus a kaleidoscope of toppings: nuts, brownies, cookies, candy, and even chunks of pie crust. The Creamery's ice cream engineers will scoop your selections onto a frozen slab and deftly fold in the toppings, ensuring that you won't have to hunt very far with your spoon for another hunk of cookie dough. Voice Places has Cold Stone Creamery down cold.
Situated along the industrial drag of Manchester Avenue, Colombo's offers a spacious spot to grab a drink and some grub. Diners can choose from a variety of starters, including Buffalo chicken nuggets, soups and salads. For larger dishes, select from pizza, burgers and sandwiches such as the fish po' boy. On nice days, guests can enjoy Colombo's front patio.
The Corner Cup is a sister restaurant to the adjacent Tamm Avenue Grill. It focuses on paleo, gluten free and vegetarian breakfast options as well as traditional fare.
Courtesy Diner has the look and feel of a classic diner complete with vinyl seats and checkerboard tiles. Diners can opt for a table or go for counter service to get the full effect. The fare includes diner favorites - burgers, eggs,a patty melt, a slinger and the "Devil's Delight," two eggs, hash browns, chili and toast.
The Courtesy Diner, like the Dude, abides. Whether you want a hearty breakfast to soak up last night's drinks, a late-night slinger to forestall the morning hangover, the best fast-food hamburger in town or a fix of cheap coffee and jukebox blues to stir your brooding soul, you'll find it here - just like you would have found it twenty, thirty, even forty years ago. Best of all, the Courtesy Diner is not an attic for Americana, and it isn't some kind of shrine to the working class; it's a working restaurant (and be prepared to pay with cash).
Since 1916 the Failoni family has been quietly turning out some of the best food in St. Louis inside this pile of bricks along an industrial stretch of Manchester. What food! A soaring lemon garlic chicken, a to-die-for Sicilian salad and a pan-fried chicken dinner on Tuesday nights that's nothing short of wonderful. On Thursday and Friday nights, Alex Jr. breaks out the karaoke machine and croons spot-on Sinatra covers. If you want to take in that show, you'll need to reserve a table in advance -- and prepare to enjoy one of St. Louis' hidden gems.
This chic Dogtown restaurant and watering hole could easily overwhelm the senses: Everything here - from the décor (muted gray-purple walls clashing with paintings reminiscent of Magic Eye stereograms) to the eclectic crowd, which includes both college students and 40somethings - has a slightly precarious vibe. But it's that playful quirkiness that makes Felix's worth a visit. With a menu of burgers, pizza, quesadillas and "Saint Louis' best ribs," Felix's has good eats and an that ambiance strikes the perfect first-date balance of "casual hang" and "potential romance," but it's also accessible enough to serve as a good jumping-off point for a wild night of bar-hopping. Or, what the heck, maybe Felix's jukebox, which favors the edgier side of the top 40, might inspire patrons to stay put and dance all night. You just never know -- at Felix's, it's always an adventure.
This vibrant bar and restaurant located on Dogtown's southern cusp touts its atmosphere, and for good reason. Nestled between nondescript buildings on a particularly bland stretch of Manchester's industrial section, JackSon's bright exterior alone warrants a second glance, with its ornately crafted neon sun light and welcoming patio. Upon stepping inside, appropriately dim lighting accentuates a long bar with lacquered wood trim, wall-spanning murals and a wooden statue of what appears to be a pirate -- or maybe a castaway. As for the food: Andy and Dave Dalton opened JackSons' in honor of their late father, Jack, a south-city tavernkeeper, and chef Vince Anderson does a fine job keeping things basic. Dad would be especially proud of the two-inch-thick New York strip, which weighs in at nearly a full pound. Beef fillet in pan jus is another winner. Appetizers and pizza are available in the bar area until late-night -- perfect for fueling up during JackSon's weekly college night or during a performance by one of the many local bands that takes the stage here.
An upscale-casual Italian eatery in Dogtown, La Gra Italian Tapas specializes in small plates, pizzas and pasta. While the term tapas usually sends palates to the western side of the Mediterranean with its Spanish olives, seafood and cheeses, the dishes at La Gra maintain the European light-bite fare with an Italian flair, such as their housemade bruschetta - tomatoes, garlic and capers served chilled on a crostini - or arancini, balls of rice breaded, fried and stuffed with veggies and mozzarella. La Gra's pizzas are Sicilian style, thick and rectangular, covered in sauce and different types of cheeses, including the regular Italian varieties and the familiar St. Louis fave. Various specialty toppings include chicken spiedini, Cajun shrimp, barbecue pulled pork and the usual meats and veggies. Diners can also special order their own pasta combinations, such as linguine in a garlic-cream sauce with grilled chicken or fettuccine pesto with scallops. La Gra also offers larger entrées for hungrier patrons, including a pork chop Marsala or beef medallions with peppers, onions and gorgonzola. Reservations are suggested during busier dining hours.
The name is a reference to where Texas and Mexico literally meet, but St. Louisans will appreciate a local geographical reference: The restaurant occupies the address vacated by Chuy Arzola's (which itself reopened in the Coronado building). The renovation is thorough and has turned a cramped, dingy space into an airy one, thanks in large part to the floor-to-ceiling windows that front the restaurant. Owners Tony and Kelli Almond, who also operate Almond's in Clayton, have put together a concise menu that hews to standard Tex-Mex dishes: tacos, enchiladas, burritos and more. The beef brisket is tender and flavorful - a welcome alternative to the usual Tex-Mex meats.
You wouldn't expect an unassuming, squat building on the commercial Hampton strip to be the flashiest bar in St. Louis, but it is. With dozens of sparkling disco balls, mirrored walls and a glitter-inlaid bar top, it's like the lovechild of a strip club and a disco roller rink, but one where karaoke is king. There's a feeling that what happens in this sparkling paradise stays here. The drinks aren't cheap, but the mixed ones are so strong that just one or two will have you crooning "I Want to Know What Love Is" in no time.
This Dogtown café offers a simple menu of soups, salads and sandwiches that's distinguished by its attention to detail. Example: pork loin smoked in-house and served with bacon, Brie, onion and applesauce. Other sandwiches include a Reuben and the "Hangover Club": smoked turkey, Genoa salami, provolone, bacon and mustard. Vegetarians can enjoy a veggie melt or the portobello Philly, while cold sandwiches include a nod to the neighborhood: the Dogtown sub, with roast beef, ham, smoked turkey, provolone, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise.
21 total results

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