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Among the clubs and hip hangouts on Washington Avenue downtown lies 12th Street Diner. The place is a throwback to the '50s and rock & roll. The menu features root beer floats, omelets, pot roast and burgers, including the La Bamba burger that is topped with pepperjack cheese, jalapenos, chipotle mayo and guacamole. This bright spot also features another diner classic: apple pie, cherry pie and a pie du jour.
Specializing in New York-style pizza, Bridge & Tunnel serves up a straightforward pizza menu with classic toppings and a few specialty toppings such as artichoke hearts and feta. Other items include calzones, stromboli and salads. The fast-casual setting offers downtown diners a quick lunch option before heading back to work or after catching a game. Weekend bar-goers can stop by for a bite to help soak up the alcohol -- Bridge & Tunnel stays open until 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.
Blood & Sand is a members-only restaurant and bar located in an otherwise unremarkable stretch just south of Washington Avenue’s loft district. If you can swing a membership or know someone who has one, you should go. Owners TJ Vytlacil and Adam Frager and chef Chris Bork have created a remarkable venue: not a snobby club, but a community of people who are passionate about good food and good drink. Bork’s menu is seasonal, sophisticated and also playful: a plate of heirloom tomatoes like an abstract-expressionist painting in three dimensions; earthy sweetbreads paired with kimchi made from apple. Vytlacil’s cocktail list nods at tradition while indulging the mixologist’s impressive creativity. Service throughout is topnotch.
CLOSED - Bubble teas, originated in Taiwan in the 1980s, are lightly sweetened, milk-based drinks. Bubba Tea & Café in downtown St. Louis sells their creamy concoctions in more than two dozen different flavors, including lychee, cantaloupe and avocado. Teas can be orders on the rocks, slushed or hot, and, for an extra fee, with a handful of those little, black tapioca balls. Their full drink menu also includes several coffee and tea beverages. More than just a beverage counter, Bubba offers a breakfast menu featuring croissant, panini and bagel sandwiches, as well as a full lunch menu with wraps, salads and sandwiches. Their pizza panini is served on grilled white bread and comes with Provel cheese, tomato sauce, pepperoni and your choice of two other toppings. They offer plenty of café seating indoors and a few tables outside along Tenth Street.
The team behind Cabin Inn The City has relocated to HandleBar, a watering hole in The Grove offering craft beer and craft bicycles.
This Mediterranean-style restaurant in the bowels of the Renaissance Grand caters almost exclusively to hotel guests, so the kitchen could try to get away with an uninspired menu and lazy preparations. But instead the food is excellent, whether it's a flaky and fatty striped sea bass or a lustful rack of lamb. A great place to eavesdrop on traveling businessmen or take an illicit lover on a date: Nobody you know will be there.
The Dubliner brings an authentic Irish pub experience to Washington Avenue, with one catch: it's too big and too loft-like to pass for the real thing, but those in the mood for a pint of Guinness and a bit of craic won't mind. The menu offers hearty traditional fare, much of it sourced from local farms: beef short ribs braised in stout, a Guinness stew, lamb, fish and chips - and lots and lots of potatoes. Stop in for brunch and enjoy an authentic Irish breakfast, with homemade blood sausage. If restaurant partner Eddie Neill is on the premises, he will greet you enthusiastically with open arms. And to top it off, a few of Eddie's favorite French wines were recommended to pair with our plate.
What makes a great bowling alley? Is it the dusty chic of 1950s-era furniture and watery beer specials? Or is it the sheer enormity of some of the newer hi-tech bowling emporiums, featuring a small city's worth of alleys, several cafés and even laser tag? In the case of Flamingo Bowl, Joe Edwards' joint on Washington Avenue, it's neither. Rather, Edwards has brought a bit of the suburbs to the city with his boutique vision of bowling. Neither too large nor too small, Flamingo Bowl offers twelve lanes, a lounge, an extensive list of cocktails, decent bar food and, of course, a healthy selection of tchotchkes from Edwards' personal collection of mid-century Americana. What's more, Flamingo Bowl is open from noon until 3 a.m. seven days a week, making it both the perfect place for a "working" lunch and an ideal place for a sporting nightcap.
A gleaming, upscale sports bar, the first of its kind along downtown's nightlife-infused strip. Foregoing the grimy, dingy ambiance of most sports bars, Flannery's is a clean, well-lighted place with a straightforward bar-food menu. A dozen flat-screens bedeck the walls; a pair of them, poised behind the bar, make grabbing a stool there a great choice for a night or afternoon of ESPN. If you're not in the mood for a burger and fries, there's a $20 steak on the menu, and a plethora of Schlafly beers on tap to wash it down. Play the Golden Tee in the back if you must, but really, Flannery's is a bit classier than that.
No need to pond-jump to Florence for a taste of frozen dairy at its finest; Chris and Dana Sherman made the trip for you. A vacation to Italy planted the seeds for this gelato shop, a welcome addition to the Wash. Ave. streetscape. Gelato flavors -- about a dozen, showcased in glass-paned coolers in luscious heaps -- include bacio (chocolate hazelnut), tiramisu and zabaglione. If you need to lay a foundation for dessert, Gelateria offers a selection of panini-style sandwiches.
Hair of the Dog offers respite from the Washington Avenue scene. This bar is frequented by downtown locals; it's the kind of place where the bartender will make fun your shot choice and whip you up something tastier, all while razzing the stiletto-ed party girls ducking in just to avoid long bathroom lines at neighboring clubs. He doesn't care how low-cut your top is -- if you aren't here for the sauce, no promises to come back with all your friends will save you from his sarcastic jibes. Don't miss: the awesome "Dead Fat Comedians" wall art by local artist and guerrilla graffiti-ist Peat Wollaeger, the kitschy signage and a rousing game of Big Buck Hunter.
Lucas Park Grille was the first restaurant to call Washington Avenue home just after the 2004 loft district revitalization. The swank hub of Washington Avenue nightlife might not be synonymous with foie gras and $40 steaks, and if it's sedate, mannerly high-end dining that you seek, look elsewhere. Its perfectly executed new American cuisine is served up on large and small plates in a large and elegant industrial space filled with stone, copper and brick and several warm fireplaces for a cozy winter spot. An award-winning wine list includes over 300 selections. On the weekends, the bar is bursting at the seams with togged up revelers sporting their finest and throwing back calorie-friendly beer and rainbow colored shots. You'll find an electric atmosphere and some of the best people-watching in town.
Chef Jorge Calvo has opened a downtown location of his popular Shrewsbury eatery - still St. Louis' only Peruvian restaurant. The menu features a broad selection of traditional dishes that draw from Spanish and indigenous cuisine as well as Asian and Western European influences. Ceviche is a national dish, here available with tilapia, tart and spicy, or with shrimp and mussels. Beef, chicken and seafood entrées predominate. Saltado de langostinos brings lovely shrimp in an olive oil-white wine reduction, while aji de gallina features a unique blend of chicken, walnut, chiles and cream.
Operating out of a large space on Washington Avenue, Mosaic offers an upscale (read: dress to impress) atmosphere. The "modern fusion" menu means these are not the typical tapas that one may be accustomed to. Options include herb gnocchi, limoncello mussels and lobster-and-crawfish risotto. Mosaic also has late-night lounge hours for those looking for an after-dinner drink.
26 total results

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