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In a town with as many blues enthusiasts as St. Louis, the question of which blues club is best can be a topic of spirited discussion. BB's Jazz, Blues and Soups inhabits a historic brick buildings that oozes atmosphere, and it offers a first-rate selection of local and touring performers. BB's features a varied schedule of musical acts, a large year-round seating capacity and full-service kitchen specializing in Cajun and Creole food, in addition to a selection of American bar food.
The Beale on Broadway home to live blues, soul and R&B seven nights a week 'til 3am.
A true taste of N'awlins awaits you at this party-time Cajun/Creole dive, housed in a 150-year-old historic building in the shadows of Busch Stadium and downtown. Order up a mess of crawfish, fried alligator, jambalaya or gumbo (the house recipe, known as Gumbo Ya Ya, is mixed with shrimp, chicken and andouille sausage), or go for one of the five grinders or five varieties of oysters on the half-shell. The Big Easy ain't just found in the flavors, though: Broadway Oyster Bar is also a great place to see national jazz, blues and zydeco acts seven days a week. Nowhere else in town can you eat gator meat and oysters and hear live music. The regulars know it, and they pack the bar so full it makes you wonder if N'awlins natives aren't coming up here for a slice o' blues, St. Louis-style. Laissez le bon temps rouler, indeed.
At The Crack Fox, visitors can feel free to let their freak flag fly or simply play the role of a leisurely standby. All are welcome at this eclectic downtown dive -- just don't be surprised to see anything from burlesque and drag performances one night to bondage and gotchic industrial garb the next. EDM spins, karaoke, open mics, metal shows and more also make up the list of participatory alternative entertainment offered here, and there's a huge selection of beer and handcrafted cocktails to wash it all down with. Take, for instance, the "ginger snap" made with ginger vodka, cinnamon Schnapps and lemonade. Come in to pick your poison and meet the cast of friendly fun-loving regulars, and don't forget to bring an open mind.
During the frigid winter months, this 20,000-seat arena is the Blues' home sweet home. But every now and again, the ice makes way for monumental showstoppers with jaw-dropping stage set-ups (think Springsteen, Lady Gaga or Nine Inch Nails, and yes, even The Bieber). Concertgoers looking for the VIP experience can rack up seats in 91 suites, 1,700 club seats and seven party rooms.
St. Louis' version of the popular tourist and music-fan destination Hard Rock Café sits in downtown's Union Station. The restaurant's décor stays true to its brethren - memorabilia covers the walls, with information posted for each item. Highlights include one of Diana Ross' dresses and a Bo Diddley guitar. After guests take some time to peruse the many rock artifacts, they can digest the extensive menu. Hard Rock Café's selections include typical American fare - nachos, wings and quesadillas for appetizers, and sandwiches, steaks and a hefty burger menu for the main course.
Harry's offers world-class picture-postcard views out the windows and some equally world-class scenes on the plate. The kitchen tosses in luxury ingredients such as saffron, foie gras and sevruga caviar for a top-of-the-line menu. Its cozy bar, cathedral-ceilinged dining room and back-room atrium (which features local jazz and rock bands) makes it a popular hangout for young professionals and couples out on the town. And though Harry's is open year-round, its summertime patio takes the cake. Larger than the indoor space, with a giant stage to host musical acts and an incredible view of Union Station, there is no better place to sip a Salty Dog.
There's not much they don't do at Lola: live music seven days a week, stellar cocktails, upscale small plates, brunch, crepes. Located just off Washington Avenue, Lola strives to be a joint for downtown denizens that's by the neighborhood, for the neighborhood - balancing loft-district energy with food and drink you actually want. The crêpes are a good bet: the Delilah, stuffed with shrimp, crab and crawfish étouffée, is especially tasty. The lineup also includes sandwiches (these, too, have female names, though not as sexy as the crêpes) and small plates such as polenta fries paired with ratatouille and pan-fried lamb chops with a panko coating. The cocktail list, many of its entries named for downtown buildings, features truly excellent martinis and even mocktails (cleverly named after infamous celebrity rehab facilities) for those on the wagon. You'll never be without live entertainment at Lola, whether it's a hip-hop spin in the Absinthe Bar or up front with the soulful stylings of Mo E or Javier Mendoza.
Lombardo's history in St. Louis dates back to 1934 with a fruit-and-vegetable stand at Riverview Boulevard and Florissant Avenue in north St. Louis. Today the restaurant family includes Lombardo's Restaurant, Carmine's and Lombardo's Trattoria. The trattoria offers the white linen-tablecloth experience for lunch and dinner. At lunch, Lombardo's menu offers fare such as a turkey club, salmon BLT and a steak burger, while dinner serves up a concise menu of upscale Italian options, with pastas as well as chicken, steak, veal and seafood entrées.
Lumiere Place is the premier gambling and entertainment mecca in downtown St. Louis. It's an immense cathedral to decadence; the 75,000-square-foot gaming floor is crammed with more slot machines, roulette tables and Wheels of Fortune than you can shake a stick at, and you'll find the most fascinating collection of persons in the joint, from grandmas neatly pulling sick stacks of twenties out of the many ATMs to awed, fresh-faced college students popping their casino cherries. Hotel Lumiere is Missouri's one and only AAA Diamond hotel, and the lighting is informed by the incomparable work of Dale Chihuly and the Aqua Lounge boasts local and national touring acts a few nights a week. Casinos don't get much better than this.
If you count down the days until St. Patty's Day, Maggie O'Brien's is the place for you. The Irish-themed restaurant, which opened downtown in 1979, serves up traditional pub grub, including T-ravs, wings, burgers and sandwiches and St. Louis-style ribs, with Irish fare such as corned beef and cabbage, fish and chips and Irish beef stew. Diners can stick around and watch the game at Maggie's or stop by after: The bar stays open until 3 a.m.
24 total results

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