You searched for:

Start over

Search for…

Narrow Search

5 results
Chopstix offers fast-casual Chinese from its north county location. The restaurant prides itself in using only local produce and meats. The menu offers a large variety of choices including chicken, shrimp, pork, beef and vegetable entrées, each available in half or whole portions. Chopstix serves up all the classics: Kung-pao chicken, Peking duck, hot-braised shrimp, chow mein, Chinese barbecue, lo mein, ma po tofu, fried rice, egg foo young and St. Paul sandwiches are just a few of the options. Patrons can feast their eyes on the barbecued ducks that hang in the restaurant. Chopstix also provides catering.
Diners in St. Louis don't head to Pei Wei for authentic Asian cuisine, but rather for non-traditional takes on Chinese noodle dishes and lettuce wraps. Large portions are the order of the day at the chain, whose restaurants combine faux Asian fare (Sriracha Chicken Salad, Crab Rangoon, and any number of pan-fried-while-you-watch entrees, all with dipping sauces) with good, old-fashioned American food court technology (check out the massive soft drink machines that allow you to sample a dozen or more sodas for one small price). Counting calories? Ask the staff to "stock-velvet" your meal and, instead of pan-frying your dishes, the chef will cook it in broth for you. Pei Wei is easy to find on Voice Places.
Diners in St. Louis don't head to Pei Wei for authentic Asian cuisine, but rather for non-traditional takes on Chinese noodle dishes and lettuce wraps. Large portions are the order of the day at the chain, whose restaurants combine faux Asian fare (Sriracha Chicken Salad, Crab Rangoon, and any number of pan-fried-while-you-watch entrees, all with dipping sauces) with good, old-fashioned American food court technology (check out the massive soft drink machines that allow you to sample a dozen or more sodas for one small price). Counting calories? Ask the staff to "stock-velvet" your meal and, instead of pan-frying your dishes, the chef will cook it in broth for you. Pei Wei is easy to find on Voice Places.
Owners Steven Preston and Ron Bray wanted to bring a different kind of entertainment experience to St. Louis. Siam is their experiment. The restaurant, bar and nightclub wants patrons to eschew labels (gay or straight, restaurant or club) and just come out for some good food and dancing. Chef Tyler Davis’ pan-Asian menu features fusion interpretations of classic comfort food. The Korean fried chicken, or “KFC,” drizzled with a sweet soy reduction, is an Eastern take on the chicken wing. Likewise, the “Umami Sliders” dress up the classic bar staple with housemade tofu, sweet tomato jam, fried shallots and wild mushrooms. Most notable is the kimchi hot pot, a steaming dish of pork-infused broth that teems with house-fermented vegetables, spinach, leeks and pork belly. Siam also serves a comprehensive sushi selection; the spicy crab and baked scallop salad on the “Goku roll” makes it a must-try. Do not pass on the desserts. Formerly a pastry chef, Davis’ creativity is on full display with offerings such as plum wine poached pears with mascarpone cheese. If the weather permits, dine on the patio, then head to the dance floor to work off what you ate.
CLOSED A fast-casual concept featuring solid renditions of popular Chinese, Chinese American and Thai dishes. In spite of the goofy name, the décor is restrained, and the focus is on the food. Old warhorses like crab rangoon and General Tso's chicken get makeovers; the former focused more on crab than on cream cheese, the latter not as sweet or gloppy as at most Chinese joints. The Thai red curry is good, and the pad thai is better (that is, less peanut-heavy) than many local Thai restaurants' versions.
5 total results

Best Things to Do In St. Louis

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.


© 2017 Riverfront Times

Website powered by Foundation