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In the heart of Soulard, 1860 Saloon, Game Room and Hardshell Cafe serves up traditional, delicious fare, plus cajun and creole food. Customer favorites include our Famous Crab Cakes and Homemade Chicken Strips. The oysters, cajun pasta, pizzas and burgers are always a great choice. Enjoy a reasonably priced meal and drinks before taking the complimentary shuttle to Cardinals and Blues games. You can enjoy live Blues, Classic Rock, R&B, and Motown bands 365 days a year in the 1860 Saloon. Play foosball, pool and more in the Game Room. The third area, the Hardshell Café, also has a full bar, ample seating, and a several hundred gallon fish tank. There is lovely outside dining where fur babies are always welcome!
Open during lunch and dinner hours only, Almonds' Dixie-tinged menu brings a little soul and a lot of comfort food to Clayton with entrée choices that include smoked trout and pan-fried chicken. The lunch menu allows diners to build their own wood-fired quesadilla or pizza, while the dinner menu offers gumbo, smoked trout and fried chicken, to name a few. Almonds' offers friendly and welcoming service but does recommend reservations.
In a town with as many blues enthusiasts as St. Louis, the question of which blues club is best can be a topic of spirited discussion. BB's Jazz, Blues and Soups inhabits a historic brick buildings that oozes atmosphere, and it offers a first-rate selection of local and touring performers. BB's features a varied schedule of musical acts, a large year-round seating capacity and full-service kitchen specializing in Cajun and Creole food, in addition to a selection of American bar food.
The Beale on Broadway home to live blues, soul and R&B seven nights a week 'til 3am.
It's sexy-time over at Boogaloo, the Cuban-Cajun-Creole lovechild of restaurateur Mike Johnson and chef Eric Erhard, who can whip their clientele into a frenzy with seductively spicy tapas dishes like steamed mussels in a bath of coconut milk and white sangria or entrées like a luscious ropa vieja or plantain-encrusted tilapia. If that's not enough to get your motor running, try tippling on crisp mojitos or tart caipirinhas at the bar, which is rigged with actual swings to sit upon. An orgy of food, drink and fun.
A true taste of N'awlins awaits you at this party-time Cajun/Creole dive, housed in a 150-year-old historic building in the shadows of Busch Stadium and downtown. Order up a mess of crawfish, fried alligator, jambalaya or gumbo (the house recipe, known as Gumbo Ya Ya, is mixed with shrimp, chicken and andouille sausage), or go for one of the five grinders or five varieties of oysters on the half-shell. The Big Easy ain't just found in the flavors, though: Broadway Oyster Bar is also a great place to see national jazz, blues and zydeco acts seven days a week. Nowhere else in town can you eat gator meat and oysters and hear live music. The regulars know it, and they pack the bar so full it makes you wonder if N'awlins natives aren't coming up here for a slice o' blues, St. Louis-style. Laissez le bon temps rouler, indeed.
Before you rush to write off a fusion restaurant that serves Creole and Korean fare, eat a Fleur de Lilies. Sink your teeth into its glorious “Waygu Bulgolgi Burger,” a thick patty of juicy beef, its richness cut only by the mouth-watering sweet-soy marinade generously spiked with garlic, ginger and chili. Nosh on its luscious, blackened salmon that tastes as if it has been poached in Creole barbecue butter. Devour the pineapple glazed duck or the fusion spring rolls or the bread pudding with cream cheese ice cream. And while you’re at it, munch on some mighty fine sushi. Owners Misha K. Sampson and Alexis Kim’s eclectic, fusion fare may sound like an odd mix, but it’s so wonderful, it will make a believe out of even the most ardent doubter.
Graham's is a convivial neighborhood spot in Kirkwood that caters to indecisive diners. Want Cajun/Creole food? There's red beans and rice, etouffee and gumbo. Want pasta? You've got five to choose from, including pasta jambalaya. Bayou baskets come stuffed with your choice of fried crawfish tails, crab cakes, clam strips, fried oysters or coconut shrimp. Then there's fresh seafood, tavern food (like burgers and sandwiches), barbecue from the smoker out back, grilled steaks and even a children's menu and house-made bread pudding in a spicy rum sauce. Head to Graham's for a low-key-but-fun Friday night, when you want to eat on the cheap and listen to some local music.
The heartiest of the food found along the old Blues Highway is the stock-in-trade of this charming Webster Groves spot. From old favorites like St. Louis-style spare ribs and pan-fried chicken to stuff you may never have tried (like delicious fried tamales), you'll find something to stick to your ribs, with more than enough left over for the next day. Cajun and Creole specialities, including a gumbo dense with chicken and andouille sausage or shrimp-and-crawfish étouffée, are excellent. Alternatively, opt for a sampler featuring the plates made famous by Guy Fieri's Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives: "CajAsian Potstickers," red beans and rice, and barbecue spaghetti. It all sounds good, doesn't it? It sounds even better with the soundtrack of live local blues bands that fill the room during the weekends.
John P. Fields matches its bar atmosphere with a menu of pub grub. Options include gravy cheese fries, potato skins and fried pickles. There's also a "mini" menu with mini burgers (a.k.a. sliders) and mini chili dogs. Heartier meals include burgers, sandwiches and wraps.
26 total results

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