January 08, 2014

Closer Look: A Remote Arizona Church Offers Followers Peyote-Induced Psychedelic Trips

Take a visual journey to Peyote Way Church of God. Although not a house of worship in the traditional sense -- there's no steeple, no ornate architecture, no flowing robes or pulpit -- Peyote Way is, in fact, a church. It was founded based on the beliefs of Peyotism, a Native American religion that uses the hallucinogen peyote as a sacrament and combines the teachings of various other mainstream organized religions -- including Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, Mormonism, Hinduism, and Islam -- in its doctrine. Read the full story on Peyote Way here.

Photos by Andrew Pielage
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The Peyote Way Church of God near Safford offers followers psychedelic "Spirit Walks" fueled by the hallucinogenic cactus peyote.
The Peyote Way Church of God near Safford offers followers psychedelic "Spirit Walks" fueled by the hallucinogenic cactus peyote.
Peyote Way Church founder Immanuel Trujillo (right) stands with Reverend Anne Zapf and Rabbi Matthew Kent.
Courtesy Todd Pierson
Peyote Way Church founder Immanuel Trujillo (right) stands with Reverend Anne Zapf and Rabbi Matthew Kent.
Peyote Way Church founder Immanuel Trujillo as a young man.
Courtesy of The Peyote Way Church of God
Peyote Way Church founder Immanuel Trujillo as a young man.
Peyote Way Church founder Immanuel Trujillo (left) with Reverend Anne Zapf and Rabbi Matthew Kent on the church property near Safford.
Courtesy of The Peyote Way Church of God
Peyote Way Church founder Immanuel Trujillo (left) with Reverend Anne Zapf and Rabbi Matthew Kent on the church property near Safford.
Peyote Way Church founder Immanuel Trujillo (right) with Reverend Anne Zapf and Rabbi Matthew Kent standing near the front gate of the church property.
Courtesy of The Peyote Way Church of God
Peyote Way Church founder Immanuel Trujillo (right) with Reverend Anne Zapf and Rabbi Matthew Kent standing near the front gate of the church property.
Trujillo pictured in the Bronx in 1993.
Courtesy of The Peyote Way Church of God
Trujillo pictured in the Bronx in 1993.
Timothy Leary pictured in 1989, in
Los Angeles, California.
Wikimedia Commons/ Philip H. Bailey
Timothy Leary pictured in 1989, in Los Angeles, California.
After 26 miles of dirt road, a large, red mailbox marks the entrance to the Peyote Way Church of God.
Andrew Pielage
After 26 miles of dirt road, a large, red mailbox marks the entrance to the Peyote Way Church of God.
The front gate leading to Peyote Way Church.
Andrew Pielage
The front gate leading to Peyote Way Church.
The Peyote Way sign next to the front gate of the property is painted with the church's tax ID number in case any curious government officials come knocking.
Andrew Pielage
The Peyote Way sign next to the front gate of the property is painted with the church's tax ID number in case any curious government officials come knocking.