Featured Review: The Mourners: Tomb Sculptures from the Court of Burgundy at the Saint Louis Art Museum 

Jean de la Huerta and Antoine Le Moiturier, Mourner no. 48, cantor holding an open book in both hands, 1443–56/57, alabaster, 16.25 by 6.125 by 5.125 inches, Musee des Beaux-Arts, Dijon. © FRAME (French Regional and American Museum Exchange) by Jared Bendis and François JAY

Jean de la Huerta and Antoine Le Moiturier, Mourner no. 48, cantor holding an open book in both hands, 1443–56/57, alabaster, 16.25 by 6.125 by 5.125 inches, Musee des Beaux-Arts, Dijon. © FRAME (French Regional and American Museum Exchange) by Jared Bendis and François JAY

Featured Review: The Mourners: Tomb Sculptures from the Court of Burgundy Carefully extracted from their otherwise permanent context in the base of the elaborate tomb of the medieval French duke John the Fearless, these 40 alabaster sculptures exude a presence and formidable craft beyond their two-foot scale. Portrayed in a kind of perpetual procession, led by a choirboy, several deacons and a bishop, the series of heavily cloaked monks appear in various states of ritualistic or personal mourning — consulting small, opened scriptural tomes or entirely enshrouded in ceremonial dress. The pieces are modest and elegant but sculpted to such an articulate degree that they withstand being taken each on their own silent terms. And yet the oppressive apparatus of this traveling exhibition, which reiterates at every opportunity the pieces' power and skill in portraying grief, so far overstates the work's merit that one almost feels compelled to deny them it. Shown in tandem with the contemporary (2008) video installation, Visitation, by Bill Viola, the effect feels even more bombastic. In the video, two older women lead one another into and out of a deluge of water and then into the grainy ether of the far distance. It's a haunting and ethereal piece that, nonetheless, feels overly literal when coupled with the equally direct symbolism of the tomb sculptures. Through September 6 at the Saint Louis Art Museum, 1 Fine Arts Drive (in Forest Park); 314-721-0072 or www.slam.org. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sun. (10 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri.)

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