Shop Local at These 23 St. Louis Stores We Love in 2023

It's easier than ever to avoid the shop around the corner. A few clicks of the trackpad and you can order just about anything you want from Amazon, Target or even (ugh) Walmart.

We're here to say one thing: Don't do that. Despite the ease of e-commerce, St. Louis has more great shops than it has had in a long time open right now, and we're not talking national chains. These are idiosyncratic retail outlets personally curated by some of the coolest people in the city. And as you'll see in the 23 shops we highlight, it's not just that they offer an impressive array of products. They also offer superior service, a better browsing experience and in some cases a way to help not just your neighborhood but also the world.

So get off your couch and go see what's on the shelves. You're sure to find something worth taking home with you. 

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Max & Moo'sYour average thrift store experience can be pretty hit-or-miss. When one’s business model is to simply invite the public to drop off their unwanted shit on your doorstep so that you can then flip it and sell it to some other idiot who will inevitably bring it back and dump it back on your doorstep again, thus restarting the cycle, that’s understandable. But there are those chain thrift stores whose names we all know, and then there is Max and Moo’s(11726 St. Charles Rock Road, Bridgeton; maxandmoos.com). A smaller shop tucked away in the corner of a Bridgeton strip mall, the family-owned affair offers a more curated thrift store experience, with a fine selection of clothing, housewares, jewelry, furniture and more on its sales floor. The store specializes in vintage goods as well, including the mid-century modern items that the masses drool over nowadays — think Green Shag goods at significantly more reasonable prices. Best of all, it’s all for a good cause: A full 50 percent of sales go to benefit the Angels Frontline charity, which works with existing nonprofits to assist political refugees and trafficking victims by helping to ensure they have what they need financially to get back on their feet. With that in mind, feel free to spend extravagantly — just don’t bother asking about the jukebox. It’s not for sale. —Daniel Hill
DANIEL HILL
Max & Moo's
Your average thrift store experience can be pretty hit-or-miss. When one’s business model is to simply invite the public to drop off their unwanted shit on your doorstep so that you can then flip it and sell it to some other idiot who will inevitably bring it back and dump it back on your doorstep again, thus restarting the cycle, that’s understandable. But there are those chain thrift stores whose names we all know, and then there is Max and Moo’s(11726 St. Charles Rock Road, Bridgeton; maxandmoos.com). A smaller shop tucked away in the corner of a Bridgeton strip mall, the family-owned affair offers a more curated thrift store experience, with a fine selection of clothing, housewares, jewelry, furniture and more on its sales floor. The store specializes in vintage goods as well, including the mid-century modern items that the masses drool over nowadays — think Green Shag goods at significantly more reasonable prices. Best of all, it’s all for a good cause: A full 50 percent of sales go to benefit the Angels Frontline charity, which works with existing nonprofits to assist political refugees and trafficking victims by helping to ensure they have what they need financially to get back on their feet. With that in mind, feel free to spend extravagantly — just don’t bother asking about the jukebox. It’s not for sale. —Daniel Hill
ProvisionsBuying a gift isn’t always easy, but Provisions St. Louis (228 North Euclid Avenue, provisionsstl.com) co-owner Debra Hunter has some advice: “My husband always says give something you’d like to have yourself.” The Hunters ought to know a thing or two about the perfect gift; their store is packed with them. Debra and Ross opened Provisions in the Central West End five years ago after moving from the Bay Area. “St. Louis is really, really supportive of small businesses. It’s always been that way since we’ve moved here,” Hunter says. “It’s palpable, and it’s not just us.” Browsing Provisions’ cozy confines on a recent rainy afternoon, it didn’t take long for the perfect gift to reveal itself. Among Provisions’ wares are candles, cookbooks, baking flour, books, pillows, scarves and paintings. The store’s relatively small square footage belies how long you’ll likely spend looking through it all. Hunter says the common thread among everything she stocks is that it is all gift-oriented, but that also includes “things to give to yourself.” To her point, we left that day with three items, two to give away and one to keep for ourselves, though which items fell into what category is something we still need to figure out. —Ryan Krull
RYAN KRULL
Provisions
Buying a gift isn’t always easy, but Provisions St. Louis (228 North Euclid Avenue, provisionsstl.com) co-owner Debra Hunter has some advice: “My husband always says give something you’d like to have yourself.” The Hunters ought to know a thing or two about the perfect gift; their store is packed with them. Debra and Ross opened Provisions in the Central West End five years ago after moving from the Bay Area. “St. Louis is really, really supportive of small businesses. It’s always been that way since we’ve moved here,” Hunter says. “It’s palpable, and it’s not just us.” Browsing Provisions’ cozy confines on a recent rainy afternoon, it didn’t take long for the perfect gift to reveal itself. Among Provisions’ wares are candles, cookbooks, baking flour, books, pillows, scarves and paintings. The store’s relatively small square footage belies how long you’ll likely spend looking through it all. Hunter says the common thread among everything she stocks is that it is all gift-oriented, but that also includes “things to give to yourself.” To her point, we left that day with three items, two to give away and one to keep for ourselves, though which items fell into what category is something we still need to figure out. —Ryan Krull
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IntoxicologyAndy Foerstel and Melissa Pfeiffer have seen major changes since opening in the Grove in 2016, but one thing has stayed constant: This is a neighborhood, and a city, that appreciates a stiff drink. Intoxicology (4321 Manchester Avenue, intoxicologystl.com) is different from the region’s liquor warehouses for countless reasons, but perhaps one of the most appealing is that this is not just a place to buy booze. There is booze, of course, and you’ll find some bottles that are hard to procure elsewhere in town. But that’s just the back walls. Front and center are all the accouterments — snazzy mid-century rocks glasses, cocktail stirrers that will evoke a Pavlovian response in martini drinkers, strainers, shakers and peelers. You can almost hear the glasses clink, that lovely sound of ice on crystal. Looking to buy something for the sophisticated drinker in your life? Intoxicology’s “Intox Box” offers everything you need to make a particular cocktail, no matter how obscure the particulars, in a gift-ready boxed display. Intox Box cocktail options include everything from a classic Aviation to local mixologist supreme Ted Kilgore’s beloved In a Pickle, a bestseller at Planter’s House. Thanks to this intoxicating shop’s packaging, yes, you can try it at home.
—Sarah Fenske
COURTESY PHOTO
Intoxicology
Andy Foerstel and Melissa Pfeiffer have seen major changes since opening in the Grove in 2016, but one thing has stayed constant: This is a neighborhood, and a city, that appreciates a stiff drink. Intoxicology (4321 Manchester Avenue, intoxicologystl.com) is different from the region’s liquor warehouses for countless reasons, but perhaps one of the most appealing is that this is not just a place to buy booze. There is booze, of course, and you’ll find some bottles that are hard to procure elsewhere in town. But that’s just the back walls. Front and center are all the accouterments — snazzy mid-century rocks glasses, cocktail stirrers that will evoke a Pavlovian response in martini drinkers, strainers, shakers and peelers. You can almost hear the glasses clink, that lovely sound of ice on crystal. Looking to buy something for the sophisticated drinker in your life? Intoxicology’s “Intox Box” offers everything you need to make a particular cocktail, no matter how obscure the particulars, in a gift-ready boxed display. Intox Box cocktail options include everything from a classic Aviation to local mixologist supreme Ted Kilgore’s beloved In a Pickle, a bestseller at Planter’s House. Thanks to this intoxicating shop’s packaging, yes, you can try it at home. —Sarah Fenske
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AO&Co.It’s hard to reduce AO&Co. (1641 Tower Grove Avenue, bengelina.com/aoco) to just a few dozen words. On one side of the specialty market and coffee/tea shop, you’ll find cheeses, wine, beer, bread, pasta, olive oil and packaged foods from co-owner Ben Poremba’s restaurants. On the other side, there’s a coffee shop/espresso bar that along with its libations sells various baked goods (including, arguably, some of the best chocolate chip cookies in town). St. Louis isn’t exactly known for its selection of independent food markets, especially those that don’t sell their items at exorbitant prices. We’re much more of a Schnucks kind of town. But this Botanical Heights destination provides what few grocery stores can: chef-created foods at a shop around the corner that’s open seven days a week, with coffee and tea to boot. Food selections vary at AO&Co., but you’re sure to find some gems. On a recent weekday, we found fresh sesame bagels, strawberry schmear and chicken salad from Poremba’s Deli Divine. Schnucks could never. 	—Monica Obradovic
MONICA OBRADOVIC
AO&Co.
It’s hard to reduce AO&Co. (1641 Tower Grove Avenue, bengelina.com/aoco) to just a few dozen words. On one side of the specialty market and coffee/tea shop, you’ll find cheeses, wine, beer, bread, pasta, olive oil and packaged foods from co-owner Ben Poremba’s restaurants. On the other side, there’s a coffee shop/espresso bar that along with its libations sells various baked goods (including, arguably, some of the best chocolate chip cookies in town). St. Louis isn’t exactly known for its selection of independent food markets, especially those that don’t sell their items at exorbitant prices. We’re much more of a Schnucks kind of town. But this Botanical Heights destination provides what few grocery stores can: chef-created foods at a shop around the corner that’s open seven days a week, with coffee and tea to boot. Food selections vary at AO&Co., but you’re sure to find some gems. On a recent weekday, we found fresh sesame bagels, strawberry schmear and chicken salad from Poremba’s Deli Divine. Schnucks could never. —Monica Obradovic
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Big River RunningEveryone knows that Big River Running (three locations including 606 North and South Road, University City; bigriverrunning.com) is the place in town to buy a pair of running shoes. Their sales staff have both the expertise and the gait-analyzing gadgetry to make sure you find the right set of kicks for whatever sort of running you do. Their prices are competitive, with online deals, too. But what’s less well known about Big River is that the store also has you covered from the ankle up. Don’t ask us to explain it, but their T-shirt game is absolutely next level. The fabric is soft, yet durable; cool, without drawing too much attention to itself. Most of the designs incorporate St. Louis in one way or another — whether it’s RUN STL emblazoned across the chest or a map of the city’s neighborhoods. “They’re a fan favorite,” says general manager Michael Bain. “And a great way to rep local pride.” One great place to rock Big River T is on one of the store’s Monday night, no-pressure fun runs. Do the shirts make you faster? Hard to say. But they will make you look good at any speed. 	—Ryan Krull
RYAN KRULL
Big River Running
Everyone knows that Big River Running (three locations including 606 North and South Road, University City; bigriverrunning.com) is the place in town to buy a pair of running shoes. Their sales staff have both the expertise and the gait-analyzing gadgetry to make sure you find the right set of kicks for whatever sort of running you do. Their prices are competitive, with online deals, too. But what’s less well known about Big River is that the store also has you covered from the ankle up. Don’t ask us to explain it, but their T-shirt game is absolutely next level. The fabric is soft, yet durable; cool, without drawing too much attention to itself. Most of the designs incorporate St. Louis in one way or another — whether it’s RUN STL emblazoned across the chest or a map of the city’s neighborhoods. “They’re a fan favorite,” says general manager Michael Bain. “And a great way to rep local pride.” One great place to rock Big River T is on one of the store’s Monday night, no-pressure fun runs. Do the shirts make you faster? Hard to say. But they will make you look good at any speed. —Ryan Krull
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City SproutsMolly Curlee and her sister Carrie Drda were running their delightful Phoenix Rising boutique in the Loop when Curlee experienced a life-changing event: She got pregnant. Curlee’s new role in life inspired her to open City Sprouts (8807 Ladue Road, citysprouts.com), which has all the style and wit Phoenix Rising (RIP) was known for, only with a kids’ focus. Eighteen years later, City Sprouts is all grown up, but it’s still going strong in Ladue for one simple reason: Curlee has a great eye for what kids like and the people shopping for them admire. The shop promises “cool stuff for cool kids,” which might be a wonderfully soft Jellycat stuffie or Klutz craft kit, a cool puzzle or a wooden dollhouse. And if you’re wondering where your most stylish friend gets the adorable outfits she uses to outshine other guests at baby showers, we’re here to tell you: It’s City Sprouts. Clothing runs from newborn to kids’ size 10 to 12. —Sarah Fenske
SARAH FENSKE
City Sprouts
Molly Curlee and her sister Carrie Drda were running their delightful Phoenix Rising boutique in the Loop when Curlee experienced a life-changing event: She got pregnant. Curlee’s new role in life inspired her to open City Sprouts (8807 Ladue Road, citysprouts.com), which has all the style and wit Phoenix Rising (RIP) was known for, only with a kids’ focus. Eighteen years later, City Sprouts is all grown up, but it’s still going strong in Ladue for one simple reason: Curlee has a great eye for what kids like and the people shopping for them admire. The shop promises “cool stuff for cool kids,” which might be a wonderfully soft Jellycat stuffie or Klutz craft kit, a cool puzzle or a wooden dollhouse. And if you’re wondering where your most stylish friend gets the adorable outfits she uses to outshine other guests at baby showers, we’re here to tell you: It’s City Sprouts. Clothing runs from newborn to kids’ size 10 to 12. —Sarah Fenske
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Elder's AntiquesWhat spins the record on an archaeophile’s Victrola varies per person, and so choosing where to shop for antiques is a very subjective choice. You may like the massive antique malls that seem to stretch on for miles. Or maybe you prefer to stick to the smaller, more curated shops. Elder’s Antiques (2124 Cherokee Street) is a happy medium. You’ll still find a fair share of random and quirky shit, but you’ll also find nicer stuff from more elegant days when people didn’t buy all their housewares from Target. On the first floor, booths are often stuffed to the brim with everything from curios, china dinnerware and lost family photos. A massive space upstairs features room after room of vintage furniture and art. Helpful staff — who likely belong to the Elder family, which has run the antique store for four generations —- are always around to help and divulge history on any given item. —Monica Obradovic
MONICA OBRADOVIC
Elder's Antiques
What spins the record on an archaeophile’s Victrola varies per person, and so choosing where to shop for antiques is a very subjective choice. You may like the massive antique malls that seem to stretch on for miles. Or maybe you prefer to stick to the smaller, more curated shops. Elder’s Antiques (2124 Cherokee Street) is a happy medium. You’ll still find a fair share of random and quirky shit, but you’ll also find nicer stuff from more elegant days when people didn’t buy all their housewares from Target. On the first floor, booths are often stuffed to the brim with everything from curios, china dinnerware and lost family photos. A massive space upstairs features room after room of vintage furniture and art. Helpful staff — who likely belong to the Elder family, which has run the antique store for four generations —- are always around to help and divulge history on any given item. —Monica Obradovic
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Frenchtown AudioFor a certain type of music lover, the wares at Frenchtown Audio (1624 South Broadway, frenchtownrecords.com) represent the Holy Grail of the form. We’re talking about those for whom high-quality sound reproduction is an obsession, one capable of consuming the afflicted audiophile and draining their wallet with surgical precision as they plunk down yet more money for their latest fix. Owner David Boykin has long been one such obsessive, and together with electronics technician Bill Huber, a.k.a. the Repair Da Vinci, who fixes up the used audio gear that Boykin then sells, he’s brought a real-deal high-end audio store to St. Louis. In addition to the retro wares, Frenchtown stocks plenty of new gear ranging in quality from entry level to budget audiophile to used-car expensive and back again. Brand names in the shop’s well-appointed showroom include Pioneer, TEAC, Marantz, Onkyo, Sony, Integra, McIntosh and many more. A stocked bar in the back of the showroom affords the generous Boykin the ability to pour those customers who make an appointment in advance a drink as he enthusiastically demos the wares on hand with a level of knowledge that betrays the decades of obsession that make Frenchtown Audio a true gem. Two fingers of 12-year scotch and the opportunity to listen to music through some of the best equipment one can purchase? Sounds good to us. —Daniel Hill
DANIEL HILL
Frenchtown Audio
For a certain type of music lover, the wares at Frenchtown Audio (1624 South Broadway, frenchtownrecords.com) represent the Holy Grail of the form. We’re talking about those for whom high-quality sound reproduction is an obsession, one capable of consuming the afflicted audiophile and draining their wallet with surgical precision as they plunk down yet more money for their latest fix. Owner David Boykin has long been one such obsessive, and together with electronics technician Bill Huber, a.k.a. the Repair Da Vinci, who fixes up the used audio gear that Boykin then sells, he’s brought a real-deal high-end audio store to St. Louis. In addition to the retro wares, Frenchtown stocks plenty of new gear ranging in quality from entry level to budget audiophile to used-car expensive and back again. Brand names in the shop’s well-appointed showroom include Pioneer, TEAC, Marantz, Onkyo, Sony, Integra, McIntosh and many more. A stocked bar in the back of the showroom affords the generous Boykin the ability to pour those customers who make an appointment in advance a drink as he enthusiastically demos the wares on hand with a level of knowledge that betrays the decades of obsession that make Frenchtown Audio a true gem. Two fingers of 12-year scotch and the opportunity to listen to music through some of the best equipment one can purchase? Sounds good to us. —Daniel Hill
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Ivy HillA favorite among smart St. Louisans since it opened in 2008 in the Central West End, Ivy Hill (8835 Ladue Road, facebook.com/ivyhillboutique) has been comfortably ensconced since 2013 in a Ladue strip mall chock full of great shopping — and it more than holds its own amidst formidable competition. The colorful, cozy shop offers just about everything a girl could want, from chunky sweaters to chic dresses to cool jewelry. Owner Hillary Dutcher offers the right mix of useful and stylish, with bold colors and plenty of texture. On a recent visit, we ogled the Halloween-ready sweaters inscribed BOO!, the cute dresses with whimsical animal prints and puffer jackets, including one in an eye-catching magenta. The common thread among those pieces suggests one reason for Ivy Hill’s staying power: The shop never takes itself too seriously. —Sarah Fenske
SARAH FENSKE
Ivy Hill
A favorite among smart St. Louisans since it opened in 2008 in the Central West End, Ivy Hill (8835 Ladue Road, facebook.com/ivyhillboutique) has been comfortably ensconced since 2013 in a Ladue strip mall chock full of great shopping — and it more than holds its own amidst formidable competition. The colorful, cozy shop offers just about everything a girl could want, from chunky sweaters to chic dresses to cool jewelry. Owner Hillary Dutcher offers the right mix of useful and stylish, with bold colors and plenty of texture. On a recent visit, we ogled the Halloween-ready sweaters inscribed BOO!, the cute dresses with whimsical animal prints and puffer jackets, including one in an eye-catching magenta. The common thread among those pieces suggests one reason for Ivy Hill’s staying power: The shop never takes itself too seriously. —Sarah Fenske
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Parker's TableA low-key lunch counter and specialty shop, Parker’s Table (7118 Oakland Ave, Richmond Heights; parkerstable.com) sells everything you need for a celebration or just a little pick-me-up at the end of the day: cheese, charcuterie, citrus-marinated olives that have a cult following, freshly-baked ciabatta (because you never leave Parker’s Table without its freshly baked ciabatta), wine and sparkling wine. Owner Jon Parker has a knack for stocking just the right thing — and making customers feel special, too.
CHERYL BAEHR
Parker's Table
A low-key lunch counter and specialty shop, Parker’s Table (7118 Oakland Ave, Richmond Heights; parkerstable.com) sells everything you need for a celebration or just a little pick-me-up at the end of the day: cheese, charcuterie, citrus-marinated olives that have a cult following, freshly-baked ciabatta (because you never leave Parker’s Table without its freshly baked ciabatta), wine and sparkling wine. Owner Jon Parker has a knack for stocking just the right thing — and making customers feel special, too.
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Four Muddy PawsShops have a tendency to open and close in the heart of Lafayette Square, perhaps because the rent in the historic neighborhood tends to be too damn high for the foot traffic. Four Muddy Paws (1711 Park Avenue, fourmuddypaws.com) has outlasted all the rest for one simple reason: It has not only the cutesy gifts pet lovers want, but also the day-to-day items they need. Sure, you can get Fido a darling little pointy hat and an all-natural, oven-baked pupcake for his birthday (of course you celebrate his birthday!). You can also get any number of high-end chew toys or bones for that all-important gift. But you’ll also find raw food to set him on a healthier diet, various leash options for good long walks, a grooming spa with a host of kindly staffers and even a self-serve dog wash for when the stink just gets too bad. (Admit it: He smells.) Co-owners Matthew Brazelton and Jeffrey Jensen offer the perfect mix of practical and puptastic. No wonder this St. Louis favorite is still going strong at 16 — and helping ensure your dog is, too. —Sarah Fenske
Sarah Fenske
Four Muddy Paws
Shops have a tendency to open and close in the heart of Lafayette Square, perhaps because the rent in the historic neighborhood tends to be too damn high for the foot traffic. Four Muddy Paws (1711 Park Avenue, fourmuddypaws.com) has outlasted all the rest for one simple reason: It has not only the cutesy gifts pet lovers want, but also the day-to-day items they need. Sure, you can get Fido a darling little pointy hat and an all-natural, oven-baked pupcake for his birthday (of course you celebrate his birthday!). You can also get any number of high-end chew toys or bones for that all-important gift. But you’ll also find raw food to set him on a healthier diet, various leash options for good long walks, a grooming spa with a host of kindly staffers and even a self-serve dog wash for when the stink just gets too bad. (Admit it: He smells.) Co-owners Matthew Brazelton and Jeffrey Jensen offer the perfect mix of practical and puptastic. No wonder this St. Louis favorite is still going strong at 16 — and helping ensure your dog is, too. —Sarah Fenske
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Retro 101/Cherry Bomb VintageRetro 101/Cherry Bomb Vintage (2214 Cherokee Street) is universally acknowledged as one of the best places to get vintage clothing in St. Louis. That’s for good reason. What sets the store apart is its wide and heavily curated selection. Sure, you could go to thrift stores and search for hours to find maybe one or two vintage pieces you’d want to take home. But at Retro 101/Cherry Bomb Vintage, you’ll have to restrain yourself from taking home all the gems you see. You’ll probably spend more than what you would at a thrift store, but at least you won’t have to sift through aisles and bins of stuff you would never want. Or maybe the hunt is your thing — in which case Retro 101 still has you covered, because the place is packed with clothes. You may even struggle to move some hangers on the racks because they’re so full. You’ll find anything from grandma-chic sweaters and vintage concert tees to high-end pieces that are timelessly gorgeous (or tastefully corny). 	—Monica Obradovic
MONICA OBRADOVIC
Retro 101/Cherry Bomb Vintage
Retro 101/Cherry Bomb Vintage (2214 Cherokee Street) is universally acknowledged as one of the best places to get vintage clothing in St. Louis. That’s for good reason. What sets the store apart is its wide and heavily curated selection. Sure, you could go to thrift stores and search for hours to find maybe one or two vintage pieces you’d want to take home. But at Retro 101/Cherry Bomb Vintage, you’ll have to restrain yourself from taking home all the gems you see. You’ll probably spend more than what you would at a thrift store, but at least you won’t have to sift through aisles and bins of stuff you would never want. Or maybe the hunt is your thing — in which case Retro 101 still has you covered, because the place is packed with clothes. You may even struggle to move some hangers on the racks because they’re so full. You’ll find anything from grandma-chic sweaters and vintage concert tees to high-end pieces that are timelessly gorgeous (or tastefully corny). —Monica Obradovic
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Road Crew Coffee & Cycles“Do one thing. Do it well.” That adage is for the birds. Road Crew Coffee (3172 Morgan Ford Road, roadcrew.cc) does two things insanely well: bikes and coffee. Co-owner Chris Green says that the shop was born of necessity. “We were riding around wanting coffee,” says Green. “Sometimes you go to a coffee shop wearing a [cyclist’s] kit and it doesn’t feel totally accepted. But as cyclists we all love coffee. It’s energy. It keeps us going.” Opened in 2019, Road Crew is the perfect embodiment of both those passions. The guy tuning up your bicycle in the back room brings just as much acumen and care to your bike as the barista behind the counter does to your coffee. The oat milk latte is exceptional — same goes for any espresso-based drink on the menu, for that matter. The cafe side of the business has an open, sunny vibe, making it a great place to study or just watch cyclists roll in with their bikes. If you’re a rider yourself, every Monday evening when weather allows (i.e. not during winter), the shop hosts a group ride that starts and leaves at Road Crew. Get some caffeine in your system before you start rolling. After, chow down on a pastry, taking in the Morgan Ford vista. Your endorphins will keep spinning long after your wheels have stopped. —Ryan Krull
RYAN KRULL
Road Crew Coffee & Cycles
“Do one thing. Do it well.” That adage is for the birds. Road Crew Coffee (3172 Morgan Ford Road, roadcrew.cc) does two things insanely well: bikes and coffee. Co-owner Chris Green says that the shop was born of necessity. “We were riding around wanting coffee,” says Green. “Sometimes you go to a coffee shop wearing a [cyclist’s] kit and it doesn’t feel totally accepted. But as cyclists we all love coffee. It’s energy. It keeps us going.” Opened in 2019, Road Crew is the perfect embodiment of both those passions. The guy tuning up your bicycle in the back room brings just as much acumen and care to your bike as the barista behind the counter does to your coffee. The oat milk latte is exceptional — same goes for any espresso-based drink on the menu, for that matter. The cafe side of the business has an open, sunny vibe, making it a great place to study or just watch cyclists roll in with their bikes. If you’re a rider yourself, every Monday evening when weather allows (i.e. not during winter), the shop hosts a group ride that starts and leaves at Road Crew. Get some caffeine in your system before you start rolling. After, chow down on a pastry, taking in the Morgan Ford vista. Your endorphins will keep spinning long after your wheels have stopped. —Ryan Krull
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STL RocksOn every bustling shopping street, there’s that store. An I-could-spend-hours-in-here store. On Cherokee Street, that’s STL Rocks (2003 Cherokee Street, stlrocks.me). Even if rocks aren’t your thing, you’re bound to be entranced by STL Rocks’ treasure trove of crystals, fossils, sterling silver jewelry and yes, rocks. In just a small space — a few shelves, a jewelry case and a display in the middle of the store comprise most of STL Rocks — there is loads of knowledge to unearth. You could either talk to the store’s staffers or glance at the several handwritten signs next to each specimen. Who knew, for instance, that petrified wood could provide stability, patience and trust, and lavender quartz could bring love, joy and self esteem? Whether that’s something you believe in or not, it’s worth taking a gander at what the store has to offer — and at the very least gazing at the beautiful treasures throughout. —Monica Obradovic
MONICA OBRADOVIC
STL Rocks
On every bustling shopping street, there’s that store. An I-could-spend-hours-in-here store. On Cherokee Street, that’s STL Rocks (2003 Cherokee Street, stlrocks.me). Even if rocks aren’t your thing, you’re bound to be entranced by STL Rocks’ treasure trove of crystals, fossils, sterling silver jewelry and yes, rocks. In just a small space — a few shelves, a jewelry case and a display in the middle of the store comprise most of STL Rocks — there is loads of knowledge to unearth. You could either talk to the store’s staffers or glance at the several handwritten signs next to each specimen. Who knew, for instance, that petrified wood could provide stability, patience and trust, and lavender quartz could bring love, joy and self esteem? Whether that’s something you believe in or not, it’s worth taking a gander at what the store has to offer — and at the very least gazing at the beautiful treasures throughout. —Monica Obradovic
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STL Style HouseSometimes it feels like our shrinking city doesn’t have much to be proud of. With a steadily declining population, shootings seemingly every day and a circus full of characters that give the place a bad rap, there’s much to despair. But one step into STL Style House (3159 Cherokee Street, stl-style.com) will have you again beaming with civic pride. STL Style highlights the best of St. Louis with merch inspired by the best parts of St. Louis. You’ll find City of St. Louis “arnaments,” T-shirts printed with neighborhood-specific landmarks, flags, signs, stickers and more. STL Style is arguably more than a St. Louis gift shop — it’s the city’s best hype man. 	—Monica Obradovic
MONICA OBRADOVIC
STL Style House
Sometimes it feels like our shrinking city doesn’t have much to be proud of. With a steadily declining population, shootings seemingly every day and a circus full of characters that give the place a bad rap, there’s much to despair. But one step into STL Style House (3159 Cherokee Street, stl-style.com) will have you again beaming with civic pride. STL Style highlights the best of St. Louis with merch inspired by the best parts of St. Louis. You’ll find City of St. Louis “arnaments,” T-shirts printed with neighborhood-specific landmarks, flags, signs, stickers and more. STL Style is arguably more than a St. Louis gift shop — it’s the city’s best hype man. —Monica Obradovic
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Procure
At 2,000 square feet, Procure (3725 Foundry Way, Unit 137; shopprocure.com)  is one of the biggest shops at City Foundry, and also has arguably the most diverse array of merchandise. It’s the first brick-and-mortar store for the Women’s Creative, which has been throwing great shopping events featuring women-owned brands around St. Louis since 2017, which might be why the store feels like highlight after highlight. There is clothing for women, babies and men, including a full line of Blues wear from local juggernaut Series 6; home goods like candles and pillows; jewelry and candy and cards and even gift wrap. It’s all been chosen with an expert eye — and all designed to be more affordable than you’d think, with most items under $100. —Sarah Fenske
COURTESY PHOTO
Procure
At 2,000 square feet, Procure (3725 Foundry Way, Unit 137; shopprocure.com) is one of the biggest shops at City Foundry, and also has arguably the most diverse array of merchandise. It’s the first brick-and-mortar store for the Women’s Creative, which has been throwing great shopping events featuring women-owned brands around St. Louis since 2017, which might be why the store feels like highlight after highlight. There is clothing for women, babies and men, including a full line of Blues wear from local juggernaut Series 6; home goods like candles and pillows; jewelry and candy and cards and even gift wrap. It’s all been chosen with an expert eye — and all designed to be more affordable than you’d think, with most items under $100. —Sarah Fenske
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Betty's BooksJust around the corner from Cyrano’s in Webster Groves is a small storefront that contains a comic-book store unlike any other: Betty’s Books (10 Summit Avenue, Webster Groves; bettysbooksstl.com). Opened in 2021, it stocks the sort of classic comic-book store fare — DC and Marvel comics, a huge amount of Japanese manga — that you’d expect. But the vibe of the space is much more akin to an independent bookseller than anything you might anticipate. The shop is light-drenched and full of quirky murals as well as a kids’ section replete with cloud lights and a play structure adorned by a stuffed snake made by a local artist. The stock is expansive, with sections devoted to comics and graphic novels about things you didn’t think could ever be in graphic novel form. Want to learn to cook or garden or draw? Betty’s Books has graphic novels for that. The store also offers subscriptions for various age groups or interests and a calendar of community-minded events that offers something for everyone. —Jessica Rogen
JESSICA ROGEN
Betty's Books
Just around the corner from Cyrano’s in Webster Groves is a small storefront that contains a comic-book store unlike any other: Betty’s Books (10 Summit Avenue, Webster Groves; bettysbooksstl.com). Opened in 2021, it stocks the sort of classic comic-book store fare — DC and Marvel comics, a huge amount of Japanese manga — that you’d expect. But the vibe of the space is much more akin to an independent bookseller than anything you might anticipate. The shop is light-drenched and full of quirky murals as well as a kids’ section replete with cloud lights and a play structure adorned by a stuffed snake made by a local artist. The stock is expansive, with sections devoted to comics and graphic novels about things you didn’t think could ever be in graphic novel form. Want to learn to cook or garden or draw? Betty’s Books has graphic novels for that. The store also offers subscriptions for various age groups or interests and a calendar of community-minded events that offers something for everyone. —Jessica Rogen
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Garden DistrictThere are stores you go to because they sell exactly the thing you need for a specific person. Then there are stores that seem to have something for anyone. Garden District STL (3203 South Grand Boulevard, gardendistrictstl.com) is the rare stop that delivers both precision specificity for a certain set and yet enough diversity of stock to satisfy. As the name suggests, plants make up a good chunk of the merchandise, but this isn’t a nursery or florist. Instead, it sells indoor plants, adorable pots and gardening supplies fit for the indoor plant lover from a large display toward the back of the store. There’s also a sizable selection of tea and brewing goods, fit for any tea lover. Then there’s everything else — and that’s a lot. Gourmet flavored marshmallows, upscale jam and honey, fancy popcorn and other foodie delights. Scented candles, gifts for kids, pet items, guides to St. Louis and even fun outdoor lanterns that are solar powered. It all comes from the brain of Memphis-born owner Kathleen Witek, who draws inspiration from both her hometown and her current one and infuses the shopping experience with Southern hospitality that always begins with a warm greeting and a sample of brewed tea. —Jessica Rogen
JESSICA ROGEN
Garden District
There are stores you go to because they sell exactly the thing you need for a specific person. Then there are stores that seem to have something for anyone. Garden District STL (3203 South Grand Boulevard, gardendistrictstl.com) is the rare stop that delivers both precision specificity for a certain set and yet enough diversity of stock to satisfy. As the name suggests, plants make up a good chunk of the merchandise, but this isn’t a nursery or florist. Instead, it sells indoor plants, adorable pots and gardening supplies fit for the indoor plant lover from a large display toward the back of the store. There’s also a sizable selection of tea and brewing goods, fit for any tea lover. Then there’s everything else — and that’s a lot. Gourmet flavored marshmallows, upscale jam and honey, fancy popcorn and other foodie delights. Scented candles, gifts for kids, pet items, guides to St. Louis and even fun outdoor lanterns that are solar powered. It all comes from the brain of Memphis-born owner Kathleen Witek, who draws inspiration from both her hometown and her current one and infuses the shopping experience with Southern hospitality that always begins with a warm greeting and a sample of brewed tea. —Jessica Rogen
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Visitors are greeted by tons of art supplies — and another mural.
JESSICA ROGEN
MO Art Supply
The newest entrant in St. Louis’ art supply lineup, MO Art Supply (6174 Delmar Boulevard, Second Floor; moartsupply.com) nevertheless has everything on hand to please the creative soul in your life — whether that’s you, your best pal or your kid. The stock is broken into thematic rooms, so you can find what you want quickly. It’s easy to skip to crafts or to architecture supplies or to printing if you want to run in and out, and one of the gregarious staff members will be more than happy to direct you to the correct area. Alternatively, there’s a real pleasure in browsing the different areas, checking out the murals by a bevy of St. Louis artists such as Cbabi Bayoc or Brock Seals, and seeing what unexpected supplies it turns out that you absolutely need. While you’re doing so, you might also get the chance to catch an artist doing a live demo or head over to the studio space to check out what classes are on offer. Here there be treasures —Jessica Rogen
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Zee Bee MarketJulio Zegarra-Ballon was preaching the gospel of fair trade even before opening his shop on South Grand Boulevard in 2011. But you don’t have to be a believer in fair wages for artisans in the developing world and sustainable production to appreciate Zee Bee Market (two locations including 3211 South Grand Boulevard, zeebeemarket.com). The storefront is a pop of color in what can feel like a washed-out Midwestern fall and winter, with brightly colored dish towels from India, woven baskets from Uganda and earrings from Zegarra-Ballon’s native Peru. Zee Bee also stocks products from Forai, the homegrown St. Louis nonprofit helping refugees living here learn craftsmanship and make money even while working from home. Browsing the smartly curated wares, it’s easy to daydream about all the countries represented within these compact storefronts. Few places in St. Louis have such a global reach. —Sarah Fenske
JESSICA ROGEN
Zee Bee Market
Julio Zegarra-Ballon was preaching the gospel of fair trade even before opening his shop on South Grand Boulevard in 2011. But you don’t have to be a believer in fair wages for artisans in the developing world and sustainable production to appreciate Zee Bee Market (two locations including 3211 South Grand Boulevard, zeebeemarket.com). The storefront is a pop of color in what can feel like a washed-out Midwestern fall and winter, with brightly colored dish towels from India, woven baskets from Uganda and earrings from Zegarra-Ballon’s native Peru. Zee Bee also stocks products from Forai, the homegrown St. Louis nonprofit helping refugees living here learn craftsmanship and make money even while working from home. Browsing the smartly curated wares, it’s easy to daydream about all the countries represented within these compact storefronts. Few places in St. Louis have such a global reach. —Sarah Fenske
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