March 29, 2013

Top 20 Claustrophobia Movies

In the new film Detour, Jackson Alder (Neil Hopkins) finds himself trapped by a mudslide inside his car, alone. It takes intense mental control, as well as purposeful distraction, to escape that kind of claustrophobic, panic-inducing situation (View it in iTunes.) So should you ever be in such tight quarters, you'll need plenty of material with which to distract yourself -- such as a list of the most claustrophobic movies to ever come out of Hollywood. By Diana Clarke.
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Buried (2010): 
Cocky beefcake Ryan Reynolds gets taken down a peg: In Buried, he wakes up in a wooden box, six-feet underground with only 90 minutes to escape (if you were wondering, the movie is 94 minutes). As a civilian truck driver based in Iraq, Reynolds, as Paul Conroy, only has these MacGyver-y tools: a lighter, a flask, a flashlight, a knife, glowsticks, a pen and a mobile phone. You know how people react when their phone only has 20 percent battery life left? Now, imagine that happening to Reynolds in this scenario.
Buried (2010):

Cocky beefcake Ryan Reynolds gets taken down a peg: In Buried, he wakes up in a wooden box, six-feet underground with only 90 minutes to escape (if you were wondering, the movie is 94 minutes). As a civilian truck driver based in Iraq, Reynolds, as Paul Conroy, only has these MacGyver-y tools: a lighter, a flask, a flashlight, a knife, glowsticks, a pen and a mobile phone. You know how people react when their phone only has 20 percent battery life left? Now, imagine that happening to Reynolds in this scenario.
127 Hours (2010): 
James Franco plays canyoneer Aron Ralston, whose arm is pinned under a boulder in an isolated stretch of Blue John Canyon in Utah. Desperate to escape, he first tries hacking at the boulder, and then cutting his arm, but neither works. After five days alone, dazed and panicked and seeing visions, Ralston uses torque to break his arm, ties it off with a tourniquet, and saws through it. The freakiest part of the whole thing? It really happened. Ralston wasn't really as attractive as James Franco, though.
127 Hours (2010):

James Franco plays canyoneer Aron Ralston, whose arm is pinned under a boulder in an isolated stretch of Blue John Canyon in Utah. Desperate to escape, he first tries hacking at the boulder, and then cutting his arm, but neither works. After five days alone, dazed and panicked and seeing visions, Ralston uses torque to break his arm, ties it off with a tourniquet, and saws through it. The freakiest part of the whole thing? It really happened. Ralston wasn't really as attractive as James Franco, though.
Kill Bill Vol. I (2003): 
If Ralston's body was trapped, in this Quentin Tarantino film, The Bride (Uma Thurman) is trapped in her own body. The reason she decides to kill Bill is because, at her own wedding, he shoots her in the head after she tells him that she’s pregnant with his child. Though she survives the wound, the Bride spends four comatose years in a hospital, being raped by a worker there and the other men who paid him for the privilege. When she wakes up, she’s angry as hell.
Kill Bill Vol. I (2003):

If Ralston's body was trapped, in this Quentin Tarantino film, The Bride (Uma Thurman) is trapped in her own body. The reason she decides to kill Bill is because, at her own wedding, he shoots her in the head after she tells him that she’s pregnant with his child. Though she survives the wound, the Bride spends four comatose years in a hospital, being raped by a worker there and the other men who paid him for the privilege. When she wakes up, she’s angry as hell.
Kill Bill Vol. II (2004): 
The Bride gets buried. But in one uplifting scene -- of course -- she jabs her way out of a pine box and digs her way to the surface, finally reaching her hand through fresh dirt, fingers spread apart, like a final move in the dance that is this scene.
Kill Bill Vol. II (2004):

The Bride gets buried. But in one uplifting scene -- of course -- she jabs her way out of a pine box and digs her way to the surface, finally reaching her hand through fresh dirt, fingers spread apart, like a final move in the dance that is this scene.
The Great Escape (1963): 
Also set during World War II, this film follows the true-ish story of a group of Allied prisoners (American, Polish, and British) who break out of an incredibly forbidding Nazi fortress by a laborious and secretive process of tunnel-digging. Despite the escape's ultimate success, a great deal of the flm is shot inside the tight tunnels themselves, full of fear and darkness
The Great Escape (1963):

Also set during World War II, this film follows the true-ish story of a group of Allied prisoners (American, Polish, and British) who break out of an incredibly forbidding Nazi fortress by a laborious and secretive process of tunnel-digging. Despite the escape's ultimate success, a great deal of the flm is shot inside the tight tunnels themselves, full of fear and darkness
The Skin I Live In (El piel que habito) (2011): 
Spanish director Pedro Almodovar conjures in Antonio Banderas a cold, calculating surgeon named Robert, on the cutting edge of his field, who holds captive the young woman Vera (Elena Anaya), whose skin he re-forms through illegal experimentation. Locked in a room in Robert's house, Vera has cameras trained on her every move, and Robert is always watching her.
The Skin I Live In (El piel que habito) (2011):

Spanish director Pedro Almodovar conjures in Antonio Banderas a cold, calculating surgeon named Robert, on the cutting edge of his field, who holds captive the young woman Vera (Elena Anaya), whose skin he re-forms through illegal experimentation. Locked in a room in Robert's house, Vera has cameras trained on her every move, and Robert is always watching her.
Snakes on a Plane (2006): 
No, it's not the inescapable media coverage from the summer of 2006, or the line -- "I have had it with these motherfucking snakes on this motherfucking plane!" -- that you know whether or not you actually saw the film. It's Samuel L. Jackson and a host of other, less interesting human beings trapped on a plane full of snakes!
Snakes on a Plane (2006):

No, it's not the inescapable media coverage from the summer of 2006, or the line -- "I have had it with these motherfucking snakes on this motherfucking plane!" -- that you know whether or not you actually saw the film. It's Samuel L. Jackson and a host of other, less interesting human beings trapped on a plane full of snakes!
Das Boot (1981): 
Rather than playing out the would-you-rather horror scenarios of other claustrophobic films, this one places a German war photographer on a U-Boat with an inexperienced crew, patrolling for Allied ships, confined by their own minds and fears -- and, of course, underwater.
Das Boot (1981):

Rather than playing out the would-you-rather horror scenarios of other claustrophobic films, this one places a German war photographer on a U-Boat with an inexperienced crew, patrolling for Allied ships, confined by their own minds and fears -- and, of course, underwater.
Cube (1997): 
In this surreal Canadian psychological thriller, seven strangers are placed, inexplicably, in a complicated maze of different-colored, cube-shaped rooms, with no way out. Not just explanation and backstory, but the very nature of time is effaced, leaving the characters and the viewer only with a sense of absurd, Kafkaesque entrapment.
Cube (1997):

In this surreal Canadian psychological thriller, seven strangers are placed, inexplicably, in a complicated maze of different-colored, cube-shaped rooms, with no way out. Not just explanation and backstory, but the very nature of time is effaced, leaving the characters and the viewer only with a sense of absurd, Kafkaesque entrapment.
Phone Booth (2002): 
Colin Farrell plays Stu, an arrogant publicist who gets his comeuppance when he's held hostage in a telephone booth -- where, of course, he's gone to call his mistress -- by a sniper. To make matters worse, he's later accused of murdering a pimp, and becomes the subject of police interrogation. Trapped in his own lies, Stu has to come clean.
Phone Booth (2002):

Colin Farrell plays Stu, an arrogant publicist who gets his comeuppance when he's held hostage in a telephone booth -- where, of course, he's gone to call his mistress -- by a sniper. To make matters worse, he's later accused of murdering a pimp, and becomes the subject of police interrogation. Trapped in his own lies, Stu has to come clean.