August 12, 2013

Where to Eat and Drink in Dogtown

Dogtown fully embraces its Irish identity as evidenced by the Ancient Order of Hibernians' St. Patrick's Day Parade where attendees hold nothing back, imbibing from sunup to sundown in celebration of St. Patrick and shamrocks. During the rest of the year, though, Dogtown is home to a solid core of neighborhood bars and restaurants. Of course, you'll find a few Irish pubs, but there's also a one-of-a-kind karaoke bar and a bakery specializing in wedding cakes. So don't wait around till March 17 -- there's more to Dogtown than just Guinness and Irish whiskey (though there is plenty of that, too).

Photos by Madelaine Azar for the Riverfront Times.

Scroll down to view images

Join the Riverfront Times Press Club

At a time when local-based reporting is critical, support from our readers is essential to our future. Join the Riverfront Times Press Club for as little as $5 a month


Pat's Bar and Grill (6400 Oakland Avenue; 314-647-6553)
If there is one place that encapsulates Dogtown, it's Pat's Bar and Grill. Opened in 1942 by Pat Connolly, then a recent immigrant from County Galway, Ireland, the eponymous pub is covered in green, white and orange. Over the decades, the venerable bar and grill has mastered the classic Irish pub formula: a down-to-earth atmosphere, friendly service and a solid menu, which includes not only a number of traditional Irish meat-and-potatoes entrees but also a smorgasbord of deep-fried fare. The chicken wings are some of the best in St. Louis, and they obviously need to be washed down with a cold Guinness.
Pat's Bar and Grill (6400 Oakland Avenue; 314-647-6553)

If there is one place that encapsulates Dogtown, it's Pat's Bar and Grill. Opened in 1942 by Pat Connolly, then a recent immigrant from County Galway, Ireland, the eponymous pub is covered in green, white and orange. Over the decades, the venerable bar and grill has mastered the classic Irish pub formula: a down-to-earth atmosphere, friendly service and a solid menu, which includes not only a number of traditional Irish meat-and-potatoes entrees but also a smorgasbord of deep-fried fare. The chicken wings are some of the best in St. Louis, and they obviously need to be washed down with a cold Guinness.

Pat's Bar and Grill 
(6400 Oakland Avenue; 314-647-6553)
If there is one place that encapsulates Dogtown, it's Pat's Bar and Grill. Opened in 1942 by Pat Connolly, then a recent immigrant from County Galway, Ireland, the eponymous pub is covered in green, white and orange. Over the decades, the venerable bar and grill has mastered the classic Irish pub formula: a down-to-earth atmosphere, friendly service and a solid menu, which includes not only a number of traditional Irish meat-and-potatoes entrees but also a smorgasbord of deep-fried fare. The chicken wings are some of the best in St. Louis, and they obviously need to be washed down with a cold Guinness.
Pat's Bar and Grill (6400 Oakland Avenue; 314-647-6553)

If there is one place that encapsulates Dogtown, it's Pat's Bar and Grill. Opened in 1942 by Pat Connolly, then a recent immigrant from County Galway, Ireland, the eponymous pub is covered in green, white and orange. Over the decades, the venerable bar and grill has mastered the classic Irish pub formula: a down-to-earth atmosphere, friendly service and a solid menu, which includes not only a number of traditional Irish meat-and-potatoes entrees but also a smorgasbord of deep-fried fare. The chicken wings are some of the best in St. Louis, and they obviously need to be washed down with a cold Guinness.

Pat's Bar and Grill 
(6400 Oakland Avenue; 314-647-6553)
If there is one place that encapsulates Dogtown, it's Pat's Bar and Grill. Opened in 1942 by Pat Connolly, then a recent immigrant from County Galway, Ireland, the eponymous pub is covered in green, white and orange. Over the decades, the venerable bar and grill has mastered the classic Irish pub formula: a down-to-earth atmosphere, friendly service and a solid menu, which includes not only a number of traditional Irish meat-and-potatoes entrees but also a smorgasbord of deep-fried fare. The chicken wings are some of the best in St. Louis, and they obviously need to be washed down with a cold Guinness.
Pat's Bar and Grill (6400 Oakland Avenue; 314-647-6553)

If there is one place that encapsulates Dogtown, it's Pat's Bar and Grill. Opened in 1942 by Pat Connolly, then a recent immigrant from County Galway, Ireland, the eponymous pub is covered in green, white and orange. Over the decades, the venerable bar and grill has mastered the classic Irish pub formula: a down-to-earth atmosphere, friendly service and a solid menu, which includes not only a number of traditional Irish meat-and-potatoes entrees but also a smorgasbord of deep-fried fare. The chicken wings are some of the best in St. Louis, and they obviously need to be washed down with a cold Guinness.
Nora's 
(1136 Tamm Avenue; 314-645-2706)
This Dogtown café offers a straightforward menu of soups, salads and sandwiches, but it's the attention to detail that will bring you back for more. Prime example: Nora's smokes many of its meats in-house, which makes a noticeable difference -- like pork loin smoked and served with bacon, Brie, onion and applesauce. Other sandwiches include a Reuben and the "Hangover Club": smoked turkey, Genoa salami, provolone, bacon and mustard. Vegetarians can enjoy a veggie melt or the portobello Philly, while cold sandwiches include a nod to the neighborhood in the "Dogtown Sub," made with roast beef, ham, smoked turkey, provolone, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise.
Nora's (1136 Tamm Avenue; 314-645-2706)

This Dogtown café offers a straightforward menu of soups, salads and sandwiches, but it's the attention to detail that will bring you back for more. Prime example: Nora's smokes many of its meats in-house, which makes a noticeable difference -- like pork loin smoked and served with bacon, Brie, onion and applesauce. Other sandwiches include a Reuben and the "Hangover Club": smoked turkey, Genoa salami, provolone, bacon and mustard. Vegetarians can enjoy a veggie melt or the portobello Philly, while cold sandwiches include a nod to the neighborhood in the "Dogtown Sub," made with roast beef, ham, smoked turkey, provolone, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise.
Nora's 
(1136 Tamm Avenue; 314-645-2706)
This Dogtown café offers a straightforward menu of soups, salads and sandwiches, but it's the attention to detail that will bring you back for more. Prime example: Nora's smokes many of its meats in-house, which makes a noticeable difference -- like pork loin smoked and served with bacon, Brie, onion and applesauce. Other sandwiches include a Reuben and the "Hangover Club": smoked turkey, Genoa salami, provolone, bacon and mustard. Vegetarians can enjoy a veggie melt or the portobello Philly, while cold sandwiches include a nod to the neighborhood in the "Dogtown Sub," made with roast beef, ham, smoked turkey, provolone, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise.
Nora's (1136 Tamm Avenue; 314-645-2706)

This Dogtown café offers a straightforward menu of soups, salads and sandwiches, but it's the attention to detail that will bring you back for more. Prime example: Nora's smokes many of its meats in-house, which makes a noticeable difference -- like pork loin smoked and served with bacon, Brie, onion and applesauce. Other sandwiches include a Reuben and the "Hangover Club": smoked turkey, Genoa salami, provolone, bacon and mustard. Vegetarians can enjoy a veggie melt or the portobello Philly, while cold sandwiches include a nod to the neighborhood in the "Dogtown Sub," made with roast beef, ham, smoked turkey, provolone, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise.
Nora's 
(1136 Tamm Avenue; 314-645-2706)
This Dogtown café offers a straightforward menu of soups, salads and sandwiches, but it's the attention to detail that will bring you back for more. Prime example: Nora's smokes many of its meats in-house, which makes a noticeable difference -- like pork loin smoked and served with bacon, Brie, onion and applesauce. Other sandwiches include a Reuben and the "Hangover Club": smoked turkey, Genoa salami, provolone, bacon and mustard. Vegetarians can enjoy a veggie melt or the portobello Philly, while cold sandwiches include a nod to the neighborhood in the "Dogtown Sub," made with roast beef, ham, smoked turkey, provolone, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise.
Nora's (1136 Tamm Avenue; 314-645-2706)

This Dogtown café offers a straightforward menu of soups, salads and sandwiches, but it's the attention to detail that will bring you back for more. Prime example: Nora's smokes many of its meats in-house, which makes a noticeable difference -- like pork loin smoked and served with bacon, Brie, onion and applesauce. Other sandwiches include a Reuben and the "Hangover Club": smoked turkey, Genoa salami, provolone, bacon and mustard. Vegetarians can enjoy a veggie melt or the portobello Philly, while cold sandwiches include a nod to the neighborhood in the "Dogtown Sub," made with roast beef, ham, smoked turkey, provolone, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise.
Felix's Pizza Pub  
(6335 Clayton Avenue; 314-645-6565)
Last year, RFT readers voted Felix's pizza the most underrated in town, which means we should all start paying more attention. Besides the generous slices of pizza, this unique watering hole always brings in an eclectic crowd, which includes both college students and fortysomethings. With a menu of burgers, the aforementioned pizza, quesadillas and the self-proclaimed "St. Louis' best ribs," Felix's has good eats. There's also Felix's jukebox, which favors the edgier side of the Top 40, and might inspire patrons to stay put and dance all night -- never a bad thing.
Felix's Pizza Pub (6335 Clayton Avenue; 314-645-6565)

Last year, RFT readers voted Felix's pizza the most underrated in town, which means we should all start paying more attention. Besides the generous slices of pizza, this unique watering hole always brings in an eclectic crowd, which includes both college students and fortysomethings. With a menu of burgers, the aforementioned pizza, quesadillas and the self-proclaimed "St. Louis' best ribs," Felix's has good eats. There's also Felix's jukebox, which favors the edgier side of the Top 40, and might inspire patrons to stay put and dance all night -- never a bad thing.
Felix's Pizza Pub 
(6335 Clayton Avenue; 314-645-6565)
Last year, RFT readers voted Felix's pizza the most underrated in town, which means we should all start paying more attention. Besides the generous slices of pizza, this unique watering hole always brings in an eclectic crowd, which includes both college students and fortysomethings. With a menu of burgers, the aforementioned pizza, quesadillas and the self-proclaimed "St. Louis' best ribs," Felix's has good eats. There's also Felix's jukebox, which favors the edgier side of the Top 40, and might inspire patrons to stay put and dance all night -- never a bad thing.
Felix's Pizza Pub (6335 Clayton Avenue; 314-645-6565)

Last year, RFT readers voted Felix's pizza the most underrated in town, which means we should all start paying more attention. Besides the generous slices of pizza, this unique watering hole always brings in an eclectic crowd, which includes both college students and fortysomethings. With a menu of burgers, the aforementioned pizza, quesadillas and the self-proclaimed "St. Louis' best ribs," Felix's has good eats. There's also Felix's jukebox, which favors the edgier side of the Top 40, and might inspire patrons to stay put and dance all night -- never a bad thing.
Felix's Pizza Pub 
(6335 Clayton Avenue; 314-645-6565)
Last year, RFT readers voted Felix's pizza the most underrated in town, which means we should all start paying more attention. Besides the generous slices of pizza, this unique watering hole always brings in an eclectic crowd, which includes both college students and fortysomethings. With a menu of burgers, the aforementioned pizza, quesadillas and the self-proclaimed "St. Louis' best ribs," Felix's has good eats. There's also Felix's jukebox, which favors the edgier side of the Top 40, and might inspire patrons to stay put and dance all night -- never a bad thing.
Felix's Pizza Pub (6335 Clayton Avenue; 314-645-6565)

Last year, RFT readers voted Felix's pizza the most underrated in town, which means we should all start paying more attention. Besides the generous slices of pizza, this unique watering hole always brings in an eclectic crowd, which includes both college students and fortysomethings. With a menu of burgers, the aforementioned pizza, quesadillas and the self-proclaimed "St. Louis' best ribs," Felix's has good eats. There's also Felix's jukebox, which favors the edgier side of the Top 40, and might inspire patrons to stay put and dance all night -- never a bad thing.
Latitude 26°  
(6407 Clayton Avenue; 314-932-5600)
The culinary traditions found on Texas and Mexico border (Tex-Mex) are the inspiration for both the name and menu at Latitude 26°. The floor-to-ceiling windows that front the restaurant bring in tons of light and create a fun, airy atmosphere. Owners Tony and Kelli Almond have put together a concise menu that hews to standard Tex-Mex dishes: tacos, enchiladas, burritos and more. The beef brisket is tender and flavorful and completely worth the trip.
Latitude 26° (6407 Clayton Avenue; 314-932-5600)

The culinary traditions found on Texas and Mexico border (Tex-Mex) are the inspiration for both the name and menu at Latitude 26°. The floor-to-ceiling windows that front the restaurant bring in tons of light and create a fun, airy atmosphere. Owners Tony and Kelli Almond have put together a concise menu that hews to standard Tex-Mex dishes: tacos, enchiladas, burritos and more. The beef brisket is tender and flavorful and completely worth the trip.