June 05, 2012

Xico Artists Featured in "Crossing the Line"

Village Voice Media commissioned artists associated with the Phoenix-based cultural collective Xico to produce a series of covers for its papers -- each one is unique to each city -- for its national story on Arizona SB1070, "Crossing the Line." Here are those images with additional artworks and biographical information on the individual artists. Founded in 1975, Xico is a nonprofit organization that promotes Chicano, Latino and Native American heritage through the arts. Its programing includes arts classes and workshops for underserved youth, community exhibitions, artist education, printmaking workshops, the valley's oldest Dia de los Muertos/A Celebration of Life festival and small-venue performances. To find out more, visit www.xicoinc.org.
Scroll down to view images

Join the Riverfront Times Press Club

At a time when local-based reporting is critical, support from our readers is essential to our future. Join the Riverfront Times Press Club for as little as $5 a month

Xico Artists Featured in "Crossing the Line"
Xico artists at the New Times office in Phoenix. From left: Irma Sanchez, Village Voice Media Executive Editor Michael Lacey, El Podrido and Joe Ray.
James Peachey
Xico artists at the New Times office in Phoenix. From left: Irma Sanchez, Village Voice Media Executive Editor Michael Lacey, El Podrido and Joe Ray.
Xico artists at the New Times office in Phoenix. From left, Reggie Casillas, Frank Ybarra, Martin Moreno, Village Voice Media Executive Editor Michael Lacey, Jose Benavides, Ruben Galicia, Cynthia Flores, Zarco Guerrero, Marco Albarran, Annette Sexton-Ruiz and Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch.
Xico artists at the New Times office in Phoenix. From left, Reggie Casillas, Frank Ybarra, Martin Moreno, Village Voice Media Executive Editor Michael Lacey, Jose Benavides, Ruben Galicia, Cynthia Flores, Zarco Guerrero, Marco Albarran, Annette Sexton-Ruiz and Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch.
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch, "The Lost Nino."
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch's art draws from her Mexican culture and the religious images she saw while growing up in Phoenix. Says Rodriguez-Veatch: "Why am I questioned or told to go back to Mexico because I am "brown?' I was born here! I am fifth generation on my mother's side, and third generation on my father's side. I am an American!"
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch, "The Lost Nino." Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch's art draws from her Mexican culture and the religious images she saw while growing up in Phoenix. Says Rodriguez-Veatch: "Why am I questioned or told to go back to Mexico because I am "brown?' I was born here! I am fifth generation on my mother's side, and third generation on my father's side. I am an American!"
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch, "Statue of Liberty."
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch, "Statue of Liberty."
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch, "Torn Between Two Countries."
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch
Mary Ann Rodriguez-Veatch, "Torn Between Two Countries."
Annette Sexton-Ruiz, "Future of Hate."
Annette Sexton-Ruiz participated in the Chicano Art Movement in Chicago's "Little Mexico" in the 1980s and Self-Help Graphics in East Los Angeles throughout the 1990s. She began artist residencies in public schools and the Phoenix Center in 1999, creating ceramic piece murals that now number over twenty and hang throughout the Phoenix metro area.
Annette Sexton-Ruiz
Annette Sexton-Ruiz, "Future of Hate." Annette Sexton-Ruiz participated in the Chicano Art Movement in Chicago's "Little Mexico" in the 1980s and Self-Help Graphics in East Los Angeles throughout the 1990s. She began artist residencies in public schools and the Phoenix Center in 1999, creating ceramic piece murals that now number over twenty and hang throughout the Phoenix metro area.
Annette Sexton-Ruiz, "Loteria 1."
Annette Sexton-Ruiz
Annette Sexton-Ruiz, "Loteria 1."
Annette Sexton-Ruiz, "Loteria 2."
Annette Sexton-Ruiz
Annette Sexton-Ruiz, "Loteria 2."
Irma Sanchez, "Your Papers Please."
Irma Sanchez was born and raised in Phoenix -- a city that inspired much of her work -- and is best known for her political art. You can find her pieces throughout the city and, next year, at the Phoenix Art Museum where she'll show her work alongside her fellow Contemporary Forum winners.
Irma Sanchez
Irma Sanchez, "Your Papers Please." Irma Sanchez was born and raised in Phoenix -- a city that inspired much of her work -- and is best known for her political art. You can find her pieces throughout the city and, next year, at the Phoenix Art Museum where she'll show her work alongside her fellow Contemporary Forum winners.