March 10, 2018

St. Louis Restaurants That Are Closed But Never Forgotten

From fine dining establishments to little-known wonders. From world-class entrees to greasy burgers on the grill. From beautiful interiors to roadside novelty experiences that we loved just for the fun of it. The restaurants we miss range from high-priced steakhouses on down to fast food bargains. The only thing these shuttered St. Louis restaurants have in common, really, is that we miss each and every one of them.

From fine dining establishments to little-known wonders. From world-class entrees to greasy burgers on the grill. From beautiful interiors to roadside novelty experiences that we loved just for the fun of it. The restaurants we miss range from high-priced steakhouses on down to fast food bargains. The only thing these shuttered St. Louis restaurants have in common, really, is that we miss each and every one of them.

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Rossino's
206 N. Sarah St.
In the basement of this apartment building lived the best little Italian joint: Rossino's. The ceilings were low, the decor was kitchy and the food was great. Rossino's was rumored to be the first pizza place in all of St. Louis.
Photo courtesy of Toby Weiss / B.E.L.T.  (photo has been cropped )

Rossino's


206 N. Sarah St.
In the basement of this apartment building lived the best little Italian joint: Rossino's. The ceilings were low, the decor was kitchy and the food was great. Rossino's was rumored to be the first pizza place in all of St. Louis.

Photo courtesy of Toby Weiss / B.E.L.T. (photo has been cropped )
Parkmoor
6733 Clayton Rd.
Opened in 1931, this old-style curb-service restaurant eventually turned into the most beloved eat-in diner in all of St. Louis. From service right at your car to a drive-up to a dine-in, the Parkmoor always changed with the times and customers followed. It eventually fell prey to chain restaurants, though, and closed in 1999. Sadly, the entire building was eventually demolished to make space for a Walgreens.
Photo courtesy of Facebook

Parkmoor


6733 Clayton Rd.
Opened in 1931, this old-style curb-service restaurant eventually turned into the most beloved eat-in diner in all of St. Louis. From service right at your car to a drive-up to a dine-in, the Parkmoor always changed with the times and customers followed. It eventually fell prey to chain restaurants, though, and closed in 1999. Sadly, the entire building was eventually demolished to make space for a Walgreens.

Photo courtesy of Facebook
Cicero's 
6691 Delmar Blvd.
This was the second location of Cicero's, with the first one just down the street still remembered as an important music venue. This location also had a room for performances, but the focus was on the food. The thick-crust pizza was outstanding and Cicero's was on the forefront in offering non-local beers.
Photo courtesy of Mabel Suen

Cicero's


6691 Delmar Blvd.
This was the second location of Cicero's, with the first one just down the street still remembered as an important music venue. This location also had a room for performances, but the focus was on the food. The thick-crust pizza was outstanding and Cicero's was on the forefront in offering non-local beers.

Photo courtesy of Mabel Suen
Shangri La Diner
2201 Cherokee St.
Though the decorations were memorable, this little vegetarian place was legendary for offering good food at great prices. Before Cherokee Street became the sensation that it is currently, the Shangri La was a big hit. It was also a favorite haunt of the late St. Louis photographer Bob Reuter, who could frequently be found holding court there.
Photo courtesy of Facebook

Shangri La Diner


2201 Cherokee St.
Though the decorations were memorable, this little vegetarian place was legendary for offering good food at great prices. Before Cherokee Street became the sensation that it is currently, the Shangri La was a big hit. It was also a favorite haunt of the late St. Louis photographer Bob Reuter, who could frequently be found holding court there.

Photo courtesy of Facebook
Famous Barr Restaurant
175 Jamestown Mall
Shopping malls are going extinct, but they might not be if places like this were still around. The restaurant inside the Famous Barr department store served food that was oddly delicious, and just fancy enough to feel apropos when you were out to eat with your grandma. And the French onion soup here was the stuff of legend.
Photo courtesy of Paul Sableman

Famous Barr Restaurant


175 Jamestown Mall
Shopping malls are going extinct, but they might not be if places like this were still around. The restaurant inside the Famous Barr department store served food that was oddly delicious, and just fancy enough to feel apropos when you were out to eat with your grandma. And the French onion soup here was the stuff of legend.

Photo courtesy of Paul Sableman
Cristo's
8901 Riverview Blvd.
This beloved restaurant in Baden closed just one year shy of a 50-year run. Even though it was once in the news for terrible reasons (its cook was abuducted from the parking lot and found dead in Forest Park a couple of days later), this place is still remembered as a great place to take the family for good food and generous portions.
Photo courtesy of Google Maps

Cristo's


8901 Riverview Blvd.
This beloved restaurant in Baden closed just one year shy of a 50-year run. Even though it was once in the news for terrible reasons (its cook was abuducted from the parking lot and found dead in Forest Park a couple of days later), this place is still remembered as a great place to take the family for good food and generous portions.

Photo courtesy of Google Maps
Home Wine Kitchen
7322 Manchester Rd.
This Maplewood stunner had to close a couple of years back after getting his with a lawsuit over tipping brought on by a couple of former employees. But while it was in business, chef Cassy Vires brought great food, a cozy atmosphere and an extensive wine list to all who entered. Rest in peace, Home Wine Kitchen. You live on in our hearts.
Photo courtesy of Jennifer Silverberg

Home Wine Kitchen


7322 Manchester Rd.
This Maplewood stunner had to close a couple of years back after getting his with a lawsuit over tipping brought on by a couple of former employees. But while it was in business, chef Cassy Vires brought great food, a cozy atmosphere and an extensive wine list to all who entered. Rest in peace, Home Wine Kitchen. You live on in our hearts.

Photo courtesy of Jennifer Silverberg
Kopperman's Deli
386 N. Euclid Ave.
This was once the best sandwich shop in all of St. Louis, possibly all of the United States. Just one look at that photo tells you everything that you need to know. With food that great and cute sandwich names (like "Ike and Tina Tuna"), we're going to remember Kopperman's forever.
Photo courtesy of Nancy Stiles

Kopperman's Deli


386 N. Euclid Ave.
This was once the best sandwich shop in all of St. Louis, possibly all of the United States. Just one look at that photo tells you everything that you need to know. With food that great and cute sandwich names (like "Ike and Tina Tuna"), we're going to remember Kopperman's forever.

Photo courtesy of Nancy Stiles
Black Bear Bakery Co-Op
3639 Cherokee St.
This collective made the best bread in town and sold it at both the Soulard Farmer's Market and at a storefront on Cherokee. The food was delicious and the products were local. They were pioneers.
Photo courtesy of Mabel Suen

Black Bear Bakery Co-Op


3639 Cherokee St.
This collective made the best bread in town and sold it at both the Soulard Farmer's Market and at a storefront on Cherokee. The food was delicious and the products were local. They were pioneers.

Photo courtesy of Mabel Suen
Busch's Grove
9160 Clayton Rd.
Set on premium real estate, this restaurant in Ladue was a one-of-a-kind, with amazing outdoor dining set back in the woods of Ladue. With the great service and the private cabanas, it was easy to imagine that you were on vacation somewhere exotic and not just in St. Louis County.
Photo courtesy of Google Maps

Busch's Grove


9160 Clayton Rd.
Set on premium real estate, this restaurant in Ladue was a one-of-a-kind, with amazing outdoor dining set back in the woods of Ladue. With the great service and the private cabanas, it was easy to imagine that you were on vacation somewhere exotic and not just in St. Louis County.

Photo courtesy of Google Maps